Phineas Winters Abbey




Daniel David Altenburg was born about 1788 in Ballston, Saratoga Co., NY, and died August, 1832, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada, at about age 44. Cause of death was Cholera. He is the son of Wilhelm Aden Altenburg (Born July 12, 1857, in Hersfeld, Hesse-Cassel, Germany; Died January 19, 1821, in Unknown) of Hersfeld, Hesse-Cassel, Germany, and Elizabeth Mosher (Born July 12, 1765, in Dutchess Co., NY; Died July 3, 1845, in Attica, Wyoming Co., NY) of Dutchess Co., NY.

Elizabeth Fancher was born about 1793 in Sussex, Sussex Co; NJ, and died after 1880 in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA, at about age 87. She is the daughter of Ephraim Fancher (born September 9, 1763, in Roxbury, Morris Co., NJ; died after 1830 in Indiana), and Margaret Nitzer (born 1760 - 1770, in Unknown; died after 1830, in Indiana). Resided in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Daniel David Altenburg (about age 26), a bachelor, and Elizabeth Fancher (about age 21), a maiden, were married about 1814 in Unknown.

Daniel David Altenburg and Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg had eight children:

  1. Jonathan William Altenburg: Born June 14, 1815, in Fort Plain, Minden Twp., Montgomery Co., NY; Died after 1880 in Unknown. Married April 17, 1852, at Point Douglas, Denmark Twp., Washington Co., Minnesota Territory, to Mary Tashentonkawe (a member of the Dakota Indian tribe): Born about 1828 in Northwest Territory (Minnesota); Died August, 1869, Cottage Grove, Washington Co., MN (about age 41). Cause of death was Consumption (Tuberculosis).
  2. Ephraim Fancher Altenburg: Born 1818, in New York; Died September 18, 1854, in Cattaraugus Co., NY (age 36). Buried in Randolph Cemetery, Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., NY. Married 1848, in Cattaraugus Co., NY, to Elvira B. Bushnell: Born March, 1826, in Napoli, Cattaraugus Co., NY; Died August 17, 1921, in Salamanca, Cattaraugus Co., NY (age 95). Buried in Randolph Cemetery, Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., NY.
  3. Mary Ann Altenburg: Born June 10, 1821, in New York; Died March, 1887, in Oil City, Venango Co., PA (age 65). Married January 8, 1840, in Jamestown, Chautauqua Co., NY, to Henry Campbell Crippen: Born January 4, 1815, in Watkins Glen, Chautauqua Co., NY; Died Unknown.
  4. Margaret M. Altenburg: Born March 28, 1823, in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died June 10, 1904, in Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., NY (age 81). Buried in Randolph Cemetery, Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., NY. Married 1849, in Unknown, to George Adam Fox: Born October 10, 1824, in Fonda, Montgomery Co., NY; Died October 13, 1882, in Corry, Erie Co., PA (age 58). Buried in Randolph Cemetery, Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., NY.
  5. George Altenburg: Born September 11, 1825, in Canada; Died February 2, 1869, in Cattaraugus Co., NY (age 43). Buried in Allegany Cemetery, Allegany, Cattaraugus Co., NY. Married to Sarah Oyer: Born August 18, 1831, in East Otto, Cattaraugus Co., NY; Died April 25, 1887, in Allegany, Cattaraugus Co., NY (age 55). Buried in Allegany Cemetery, Allegany, Cattaraugus Co., NY.
  6. Elizabeth C. Altenburg: Born September, 1827, in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died February 27, 1905, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 76). Buried in Montrose Cemetery, Montrose, Susquehanna Co., PA.  Married about 1862 in Pennsylvania, to Jonas Mack: Born 1813 in Bridgewater, Susquehanna Co., PA; Died July 28, 1890, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (about age 76). Buried in Montrose Cemetery, Montrose, Susquehanna Co., PA.
  7. Sarah Jane Altenburg: Born August 8, 1830, in Canada; Died May 25, 1918, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 87). Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Married  October 3, 1850, in Unknown, to Archelaus Towne Hall: Born October 20, 1823, in Westfield, Chautauqua Co., NY; Died February 22, 1899, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 75). Buried in Floral Park Cemetery, Johnson City, Broome Co., NY.
  8. Abigail Elizabeth Altenburg: Born June 14, 1832, in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died July 24, 1924, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 92). Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Married (1) after 1850, in Unknown, to Edwin Vail: Born about 1831 in New York; Died Unknown. Divorced about 1862, in Warren Co., PA. Married (2) about 1866 in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, to Charles Nitzer Fancher: Born March 28, 1823, in Bridgewater, Susquehanna Co., PA; Died March 11, 1869, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 45). Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Abigail then then Married (3) after 1883, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, to Charles Geer Merrill: Born about 1831, in Pennsylvania; Died March 5, 1891, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 60). Abigail then Married (4) February 4, 1902, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, to Spencer L. Woodworth: Born July 6, 1831, in Cattaraugus Co., NY; Died April 29, 1902, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 70). Buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA.

Daniel David Altenburg died August, 1832, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada, at about age 44. Cause of death was Cholera.

Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg then married Phineas Winters Abbey.

Phineas Winters Abbey was born about 1802, in Haldimand Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada, and died after 1885, probably in Pennsylvania. He is the son of Nathaniel Abbey of Dutchess Co., Province of New York, and Mary "Polly" Winters of Dutchess Co., Province of New York.

Phineas Winters Abbey (about age 32), a bachelor, and Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg (about age 41), a widow, were married about 1834 in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Phineas Winters Abbey and Elizabeth (Fancher) (Altenburg) Abbey had one child:

  1. Pauline Lorinda Abbey: Born September, 1836, probably in Ellicott, Chautauqua Co., NY; Died 1876, probably in Sherman, Grayson Co., TX (about age 40). Married November 27, 1856, in Columbus, Warren Co., PA, to Edson Scott Fancher: Born November 23, 1834, in Bridgewater, Susquehanna Co., PA; Died June 11, 1908, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA (age 75). Buried in Angelus Rosedale Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA.


November 7, 2020

Kay Koslan edited comments.

But thinking about the Altenburg children... 

When Daniel died the children were: 

Jonathan William Altenburg: Born June 14, 1815, in Fort Plain, Minden Twp., Montgomery Co., NY - age 17

Ephraim Fancher Altenburg: Born 1818, in New York - age 15

Mary Ann Altenburg: Born June 10, 1821 - age 11, if she was living

Margaret M. Altenburg: Born March 28, 1823, in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada- age 9

George Altenburg: Born September 11, 1825, in Canada - age 7

Elizabeth C. Altenburg: Born September, 1827, in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada - age 5

Sarah Jane Altenburg: Born August 8, 1830, in Canada - age 2

Abigail E. Altenburg: Born June 14, 1832, in Port Hope, Durham Co. - age 2 months

What this suggests is that Margaret, George, Elizabeth, Sarah Jane, and Abigail would more or less have thought of Phineas as their father, and why Sarah Jane (Altenburg) Hall would have the pictures of Phineas and Elizabeth in her photo album.


 




TIMELINE

https://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html

Ontario was known as: "Upper Canada" from December 26, 1791, to February 10, 1841; "Canada West" from February 10, 1841, to July 1, 1867; and "Ontario" after July 1, 1867.

Daniel David Altenburg was born about 1788, in Ballston, Saratoga Co., NY.

Elizabeth Fancher was born 1793 in Sussex, Sussex Co; NJ.

Phineas Winters Abbey was born about 1802 in Haldimand Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada.

The two items below are from the publication To Cast A Reflection published by the Oshawa Historical Society, Ontario, Canada, in 2018. Since this date, new information helps to clarify the original publication.


Phineas W. "P.W." Abbey

Phineas Abbey was one of Lurenda's brothers, born shortly after 1800. He most likely grew up in Port Hope with the rest of his siblings and sometime after starting his family, between 1833 and 1839, he moved to New York. From his letters we know his wife was named Elizabeth and he had several daughters: Abbie, Jane "Jenny", Pauline "Polly" and son, Ephraim. It's possible P.W. had a couple of other daughters and at least two sons, but their names are unknown.

He lost touch with his family sometime after moving to New York and was reconnected with them in 1856. He continued to stay in touch with them and visited Canada a few times. P.W. moved a couple times within New York before settling in Columbus, Pennsylvania, where he farmed 26 acres of land. His death is unknown, but he was alive in 1885.

Here is a suggested edit:

Phineas Winters "P.W." Abbey

Phineas Winters Abbey was one of Lurenda's brothers, born about 1802 in Haldimand Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada. He most likely grew up in Port Hope with the rest of his siblings and sometime after his marriage about 1834 in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada, to Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg, the widow of Daniel David Altenburg, he moved to New York. He had three step-sons, five step-daughters, and one daughter, Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey, who was born September, 1836, probably in Ellicott, Chautauqua Co., NY.

He lost touch with his Abbey and Henry families sometime after moving to New York, and was reconnected with them in 1856. He continued to communicate with them, and visited Canada a few times. P.W. moved a couple of times within New York before settling in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA , where he farmed 26 acres of land. His death is unknown, but he was alive in 1885.


Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey

Pauline "Polly" Abbey was born in 1833, in Canada, to Phineas and Elizabeth Abbey. Growing up in the United States, she never met her family in Canada, however, she eventually reconnected with Thomas and Lurenda. All of Polly's letters are from the same year, 1856, giving us a glimpse of her life. She had a hard start in life, being sick constantly until the age of 10 when she was finally well enough to go to school. She attended Randolph Academy and Ladies' Seminary for approximately four years before becoming a teacher. Polly had the chance to visit Canada to meet her uncles, aunts, cousins and grandmother.

After 1856, there is no record of Polly. She most likely got married and had children of her own as one of her letters references Pauline's little Eddy.

Here is a suggested edit:

Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey

Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey was born September, 1836, probably in Ellicott, Chautauqua Co., NY, to Phineas W. "P.W." Abbey and Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg. Growing up in the United States, she never met her family in Canada, however, she eventually reconnected with Thomas Henry and Lurenda (Abbey) Henry. All of Polly's letters are from the same year, 1856, giving us a glimpse of her life. She had a hard start in life, being sick constantly until the age of 10 when she was finally well enough to go to school. She attended Randolph Academy and Ladies' Seminary for approximately four years before becoming a teacher. Polly had the chance to visit Canada to meet her uncles, aunts, cousins, and grandmother.

Edson Scott Fancher and Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey were married November 27, 1856, in Columbus, Warren Co., PA.

Edson Scott Fancher and Pauline Lorinda "Polly" (Abbey) Fancher had two children, both born in Edson Scott Fancher Jr., and Edison Ebbin "Eddie" Fancher, both born in Gordon Twp., Todd Co., MN.

After the 1875 Minnesota State Census for Gordon Twp., Todd Co., Minnesota Territory, there is no record of Polly. She probably died 1876, in Sherman, Grayson Co., TX, at about age 40.


Daniel David Altenburg and Elizabeth Fancher were married about 1814 in New York.


   

In November, 1818, and again in 1821, the Albany Gazette newspaper contained articles that Eve Altenburg and Catherine Altenburg, together with Daniel Altenburg of Upper Canada, William  Altenburg Jr. of Upper Canada, Henry Altenburg, John Altenburg, Isaiah Nessle and Peggy his wife, Jacob Vedder Jr. and his wife Betsey, and Henry Vedder and his wife Betty, were tenants in common to land in Montgomery Co., NY, and desired that the land be partitioned.


   

In February 25, 1831, Daniel Altenburg made a Land Lease Petition for Lot. No. 8, 5th Concession, Clarke Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada. The Surveyor General reported in November, 1831, that the lot is a Clergy Reserve and does not appear to have been applied for.


In 1832, Daniel Altenburg made a Land Lease Petition in Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" Altenburg was born June 14, 1832, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Daniel David Altenburg died August, 1832, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada, at about age 44. Cause of death was Cholera.


The Cobourg Star, Cobourg, Durham Co., Upper Canada

Death Notices of Ontario, by William D. Reid

August 29, 1832

During the past week, no fewer than four tavern keepers have fallen victim to the cholera, between this place and the township of Pickering - namely: Mr. Post, Jr., of Pickering; James Bates, of Darlington; A. Butterfield, of Hope; and D. Altenburg, also of Hope.


Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg then married Phineas Winters Abbey.

Phineas Winters Abbey (about age 32), a bachelor, and Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg (about age 41), a widow, were married about 1834 in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada.

After their marriage, Elizabeth (Fancher) (Altenburg) Abbey sold the land she had in Upper Canada, and the Phineas Winters Abbey family moved to Chautauqua Co., NY.

Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey was born September, 1836, probably in Ellicott Twp., Chautauqua Co., NY.

The 1840 U. S. Census taken on 1840, shows Phineas Abbey is living in Ellicott Twp., Chautauqua Co., NY. Living there are: 1 Male age 30 - 39 (Phineas); 1 male age 10 - 14 (Ephraim); 1 Female age 30 - 39 (Elizabeth); 1 female age 10 - 14 (Abigail); 1 female age 5 - 9 (Jane); and 1 female under 5 (Pauline).

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on September 10, 1850, shows Phineas Abbey (age 43) born in Canada, is a Farmer, and is living in Randolph Twp., Cattaraugus Co., NY. Living with him are: Elizabeth Abbey (age 52) born in New Jersey; Elizabeth Altenburgh (age 21) born in Canada; Jane Altenburgh (age 19) born in Canada; Abigail Altenburgh (age 17) born in Canada; Polly Altenburgh (age 14) born in New York; Isaac Stanly (age 33) born in New York, a Farmer; Luther Stanly (age 8) born in New York; and Joseph Stanly (age 8) born in New York.

In 1852 or 1853, the Phineas Winters Abbey family moved from Randolph Twp., Cattaraugus Co., NY, to Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA.

On August 21, 1854, Edwin Vail purchased several parcels of land in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA.

On March 5, 1856, Phineas Abbey purchased for $250 from Edwin Vail and wife, of Columbus, Warren Co., PA, a 35 acre parcel of land in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA.


Phineas Abbey purchased for $250 from Edwin Vail and wife, of Columbus, Warren Co., PA, a 35 acre parcel of land in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA.


The Warren Mail, Warren, Warren Co., PA, November 11, 1858

The land owned by Edwin Vail was foreclosed upon about November, 1858. Edwin Vail purchased this land in 1854.


The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 7, 1860, shows P. W. Abbey (age 60) born in New York, and with Real Estate of $600 and Personal Estate of $150 is a Farmer, and is living in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA. Living with him are: Elizabeth Abbey (age 65) born in New York; and Abigail Altenberg (age 27) born in Canada, a Domestic.

Leigh Larson note: Abigail Elizabeth (Altenburg) Vail had apparently already separated from her husband, Edwin Vail, and was using her maiden name of Abigal E. Altenburg.


The Warren Mail, Warren, Warren Co., PA, Saturday, May 17, 1862

Proclamation.

In Warren County, Common Pleas. No. 4, Dec. Term, 1861. Libel in Divorce &c. Subpoena and ahas Subpoena returned Nihil.

Abigail Vail, by her next friend, Phineas Abbey Libellant, versus Edwin Vail Respondent.

To Edwin Vail, Respondent. You are hereby notified to be and appear in the Court of Common Pleas of Warren County on or before the first Monday of June next to answer the complaint of said Abigail Vail, Libellant in the above case.

Witness my hand and seal at Warren this 5th day of May, 1862. H. P. KINNEAR, Shff. L. S.


Edwin Vail and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) Vail were divorced about 1862 in Warren Co., PA.


           

The presumed pictures of Phineas Winters Abbey and Elizabeth (Fancher) (Altenburg) Abbey, and the back of the Elizabeth (Fancher) (Altenburg) Abbey picture, ca. 1863. Images scanned from old family albums and provided by Donna Glass.


   

The 1865 Plat Map for Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA, shows Phineas Winters Abbey owns land in to southeast corner of the Township.  


Margaret Altenburg Fancher was born about 1867 in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on September 18, 1870, shows T. W. Aby (age 67) born in Upper Canada, and with father and mother of foreign birth, and with Real Estate of $1,400 and Personal Estate of $780 is a Farmer, and is living in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA. Living with him is: Elizabeth Aby (age 76) born in New Jersey, who is Keeping House.


   

The 1878 Plat Map for Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA, shows Phineas Winters Abbey owns 26 acres of land in the southeast corner of the Township.  


It seems that neither Phineas W. Abbey nor Elizabeth (Fancher) (Altenburg) Abbey could read or write. Their letters appear to have been written by others.


November 27, 1878

Corrected Spelling/punctuation

Spring Creek Nov 27th/78

Dear Brother Henry, 

Yours of Nov 12th came safely to hand, indeed it is a long time since we have heard from you, and we are glad to hear of your recovered health. We too feel that time with us is liable to change into eternity, at any moment. At present my own health is very good, Mrs. Abby is pretty much the same as when you were here, sometimes quite smart at others feeble, but her mind is always good. We have both united with the Congregational Church at Spring Creek burg, and feel very much at home there. Our Church here is at sixes and sevens, if anything worse than a year ago, God knows I do not say this from any motive only that it is the truth and He alone can tell what the end will be. Elder Mason preaches here again this year but now talks of moving up beyond Barry on Carter Hill, where he has just been holding a series of meetings, and a large revival some ninety converts.

Abbie has been home, but is now gone home to Binghamton. She is well and doing well. The other girls write often and are all well Jenny was up a few months ago.

We had a letter from Pauline’s little Eddy. They were well, Eddy had been twenty miles out of the city staying through the hot weather. The yellow fever did not reach them. We have no one with us now, we get along nicely alone, I did not say above what I will say here Elder Sweet was a main help in the meetings I spoke of, only some ten or twelve had started before he joined Elder Mason. The Church held a quarterly meeting here commencing last Friday evening, closed Monday evening, they tried to start a revival but could not awaken an interest, Elder Sweet said “It was no use.” There has been no weekly regular prayer meeting for three months. 

What will become of us, as a people I cannot see. I can only hope and pray. They have some good working members, if they could do the work, they had a good Sunday school this past summer. Perhaps all will be well yet. 

In regard to coming to Canada I would be glad to come, perhaps I may yet be permitted to come but if I am not, it will be all for the best. We shall have an eternity beyond this to commune with those who are in Christ and bearing his cross and bonds. My faith is strong that we shall meet beyond the River of Death, in the city not made with hands.

Please do not delay writing so long again, we want to hear from you oftener. 

This from your brother and Sister in Christ and the flesh our love to you all and all my dear relatives and friends

P. W. and E. Abby,

By Mrs. F. F. Brooks, who joins heartily in this letter and its hopes and well wishes. 

Annotations:

Mrs. F. F. Brooks if Frances Freelove (Dailey) Brooks, who was born October 14, 1841, in New York, and in 1880 lived in Spring Creek Twp., Warren Co., PA, Her husband is Stephen C. Brooks.

Spring Creek (not sure where this is); Nov. 27, 1878 (to Thomas from P. W. and E. Abbey) (Written by Mrs. F. F. Brooks)

“Mrs. Abby is pretty much the same, as when you were here sometimes quite smart, at others feeble, but her mind is always good.”

·         Mrs. Abbey may have been ill

“We have both united with the Congregational Church at Spring Creek burg, and feel very much at home there.”

·         Mr. and Mrs. Abbey attended the Congregational Church in Spring Creek

“Elder Mason preaches here again this year, but now talks of moving up beyond Barry, on Carter Hill, where he has just been holding a series of meetings, and a large revival Some ninety converts.”

·         someone called Elder Mason preached at their church, then possibly moved to Carter Hill

“Abbie has been home, but is now gone home to Binghamton. She is well and doing well. The other girls write often and are all well Jenny was up a few months ago.”

·         Abbie is their daughter? She lived in Binghamton, NY.

·         Jenny came for a visit

“We had a letter from Pauline’s little Eddy They were well, Eddy had been twenty miles out of the city staying through the hot weather. The yellow fever did not reach them.”

·         Pauline? Eddy?

·         Perhaps the yellow fever was quite prevalent at the time (the internet suggests that there was an epidemic in 1878 in Tennessee)

“Elder Sweet was a main help in the meetings I I spoke of, only some ten or twelve had started before he joined Elder Mason. The Church held a quarterly meeting here commencing last Friday evening, closed Monday evening, they tried to start a revival but could not awaken an interest, Elder Sweet said “It was no use.” There has been no weekly regular prayer meeting for three months”

·         Elder Sweet and Elder Mason?

“In regard to coming to Canada I would be glad to come, perhaps I may yet be permitted to come but if I am not, it will be all for the best.”

·         they wanted to (and may have) visited the Henry’s in Canada

Annotations:

Phineas W Abby – Brother to Lurenda (Abbey) Henry

Letter from Spring Creek – November, 1878

Mrs. Abbey – his wife

Recently switched churches

Elder Mason?

Abbie – daughter

other girls?

Jenny daughter

"We had a letter from Pauline's little Eddy." This does not guarantee it, but it is possible that Pauline Abby Fancher has passed away.

KK: This statement makes one wonder if Thomas and Lurenda Henry visited at a different time because from when Thomas and Lurenda Henry first visited in about Aug 1856 to when Phineas writes 27 Nov 1878 is a long time. We also know that Elizabeth is still alive, as he signs the letter on Page 142 as P and E Abby, and of course, he talks about Elizabeth. We also know that they have found a church at Spring Creek:  

"We have both united with the Congregational Church at Spring Creek Burg.

Daughter Pauline has a son named Eddy? – the yellow fever did not reach him

·     In 1878, the outbreak began in New Orleans and spread up the Mississippi River and went inland. recorded 120,000 cases and between 13,000-20,000 deaths

·     July 1878 there was an outbreak south of Memphis was hit pretty hard

·     Yellow fever is carried by mosquitoes (originally from West Africa and brought over to America on Slave ships). The disease needs warm weather but thrives in wet hot summers. Victims usually die within 2 weeks. The virus affects multiple organ systems and causes internal bleeding; it can be fatal: 3-6 day incubation period, flu like symptoms after a short remission victim starts to vomit blood and suffer liver and renal failure, jaundice is also typical symptom, hence the name. Survivors can feel the effects for months. 3-6 day incubation period, flu like symptoms after a short remission victim starts to vomit blood and suffer liver and renal failure, jaundice is also typical symptom, hence the name. Survivors can feel the effects for months. 

·     Epidemic ended with first frost in October

·     Worst American outbreak of yellow fever occurred in the Mississippi River Valley in 1878

By 1878, all children have moved out.

No weekly regular prayer meeting for months?

Worries about the future. 

“…if you are not able to write get some one to write for you”

·         Lurenda (Abbey ) Henry may not have been well enough to write at this point

“Uncle would like to get a letter from you often as his sisters are passing away…”

·         John’s uncle (Lurenda’s brother?) has had sisters passing away (this may be Lurenda’s sisters as well)


The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June, 1880, shows Phinneas Abbey (age 70) born in New York to New Jersey and Vermont-born parents, is a married Farmer, and is living in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA. Living with him are: his wife, Elizabeth Abbey (age 87) born in New York to New York and New Jersey-born parents, and who is Blind, who is Keeping House; his widowed daughter, Abbie Fancher (age 44) born in Canada to New York and New Jersey-born parents, who is Keeping House; and his granddaughter, Margari Fancher (age 12) born in New York to Pennsylvania and Canada-born parents.


The 1880 Supplemental Census Report which shows that Elizabeth Abbey has cataracts due to old age, but is not totally blind.


Elizabeth (Fancher) (Altenburg) Abbey died after 1880, probably in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA, at about age 87.


October 29, 1885

Corrected Spelling/punctuation

First message, from Phineas W. Abby to Laurinda (Rossie) Henry (written by John Henry)

Mrs. Rossie Henry

Harriston, Minto, Wellington Co., Ontario, Canada, October 29, 1885

Dear Sister,

I went out to Michigan on the 25th of September got back on the 3rd Oct. Found Jane and the rest of them well. They are doing very well and like the place well and have things comfortable. They have a house 20 X 26 and painted white outside. James is out of debt and has about $150.00 coming to him and is going to the lumber woods this winter. He has a job of cutting shingle timber and intends to buy himself a team next spring and devote his time to working his farm. He has not done much on his place yet he has been working out nearly all the time, he has twelve acres cleared.

I am as well as usual and would like to hear from you soon to know how you are and the rest of the folks. Give my best respects to all the folks and a share for yourself. I remain your affectionate brother

Phineas W. Abby

Harriston, Ontario; October 29th, 1885

Second message, from John Henry to Laurinda (Rossie) Henry (written by John Henry)

Dear Aunt, 

We would like to hear from you often to know how you are getting along if you are not able to write get someone to write for you. Uncle would like to get a letter from you often as his sisters are passing away and he feels lonely at times. Although he appears to enjoy himself pretty well but when cold weather comes he will not be able to get around as much as he does now. We are all well at present. Good bye, 

John Henry

“I went out to Michigan on the 25th of September got back on the 3rd Oct. Found Jane and the rest of them well and they are doing verry well and like the place well and have things comfortable they have a house 20 X 26 and painted white outside…”

·         Phineas travelled to Michigan to visit Jane’s family

“James is out of debt and has about $150.00 coming to him and is going to the lumber woods this winter he has a job of cutting shingle timber and intends to buy himself a team next spring and devote his time to working his farm…”

·         James was in debt for a while

·         He managed to get a lumber job

(Second message, written by from John Henry)

Annotations:

1885 – Harriston, Ontario

Phineas was visiting his nephew, John Henry, in Harriston, Minto, Wellington Co., Ontario, Canada

I went out to Michigan on the 25th of September got back on the 3rd Oct. Found Jane and the rest of them well. They are doing very well and like the place well and have things comfortable. They have a house 20 X 26 and painted white outside. James is out of debt and has about $150.00 coming to him and is going to the lumber woods this winter.
 
KK:   This is probably Sarah Jane (Jennie) Altenburg and Archelaus Towne Hall in Michigan.  We have Sarah Jane and Archelaus living in Jackson, Michigan in the 1860 and 1870 Census records. From Leigh Larson: The Jackson Citizen, Jackson City, Jackson Co., MI, Thursday, October 25, 1888 Personal Mention.

* A. T. HALL, of Kalamazoo, is in the city.


Sarah Jane and Archaelaus reappear in the 16 Feb 1892 Binghamton, Broome, New York census records and the 1890 City Directory for Binghamton.  It is possible that either John Henry heard Phineas call Archelaus "James" or John Henry didn't know how to spell Archelaus. 

There is no mention of Elizabeth Fancher Altenburg Abbey in the 1885 letter from Phineas.  This suggests that after the Jun 1880 Census and 25 Sep 1885, Elizabeth has passed away.

Phineas portion of letter:

Took a trip to Michigan to visit Jane. (Is this also Jennie?)

·         Her and her husband James must have recently moved there

·         They have a house, 20x26 painted white

James is now out of debt and I believe making $150 now. 

·         Farm, cuts shingle timber – owns 12 acres

 John Henry portion of letter:

Uncle would like a letter as his sisters are passing away?

P W and E Abby – In the States – Spring Creek 1878 (to Brother)

Pauline who has an Eddy                                             

Jenny 

Abbie – home to Binghamton

other girls

P L Abbey – Columbus (To Aunt and Uncle)

                Abbie  - 1856

Polly (Aunt and Uncle) – 1856 – parents reside in Columbus Warren, Pens. brothers in Allegany

Phineas W Abby  - Harriston – 1885 (Sister)

Jane and James 


Phineas Winters Abbey died after 1885, probably in Pennsylvania, at about age 85.

Mary Ann (Altenburg) (Crippen) Hamilton died March, 1887, in Oil City, Venango Co., PA at age 65. Buried in Pine Grove Cemetery, Corry, Erie Co., PA.


The Montrose Democrat, Montrose, Susquehanna Co., PA, Friday, April 1, 1887

TOWN, COUNTY, ETC.

Mrs. Jonas Mack was suddenly summoned to Oil City, on Saturday last, because of the serious illness of a sister, who died before Mrs. Mack reached her.


Jonas Mack died July 28, 1890, in Allegany Cemetery, Allegany, Cattaraugus Co., NY, at age 77. Buried in Montrose Cemetery, Montrose, Susquehanna Co., PA.


The Montrose Democrat, Montrose, Susquehanna Co., PA, Friday, August 1, 1890

Death of Jonas Mack.

Jonas Mack, aged 77 years, died Monday morning at his home in Binghamton. Funeral services were held t the late residence of the deceased Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock, and Wednesday the remains were brought to Montrose for burial. Mr. Mack was for many years a well-known citizen of Montrose, and was highly esteemed by all.


Elizabeth C. Mack died February, 1905, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 76. Buried in Montrose Cemetery, Montrose, Susquehanna Co., PA.


The Montrose Democrat, Montrose, Susquehanna Co., PA, Thursday, March 2, 1905,

DEATH'S DOINGS.

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Mack

The death of Mrs. Elizabeth C. Mack, widow of the late Jonas Mack, occurred at her late home in Binghamton, on Sunday afternoon last, at the age of 76 years. Mrs. Mack was formerly a resident of Montrose, where she had many friends who will regret to learn of her death. She was a devoted member of the Episcopal church, and a most estimable Christian lady. She is survived by the following children: Miss Abbie E. Mack and Archelaus H. Mack, of Binghamton, and Theodore F. Mack of Montrose, Pa. The funeral took place Wednesday morning.


Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) (Fancher) (Merrill) Woodworth died July 24, 1924, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 91. Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.


Mrs. Abbie E. Woodworth.

Mrs. Abbie E. Woodworth, 92 years old, died this morning at 7 o'clock. She is survived by a son, Alvin D. Fancher; a niece, Miss Abbie E. Mack; and three nephews, A. A. Mack, of this city, W. S. Fox of Meadeville, Pa., and Charles T. Hall of Pittsburgh, Pa. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:20 o'clock at the Cornell-Dibble Home for Services, 68 Henry street. Burial will be in Spring Forest Cemetery.


Abbie E. Mack died November 25, 1938, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 68. Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.


The Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, Friday, November 25, 1938

ABBIE E. MACK

Abbie E. Mack of 74 Conklin avenue died in this city early this morning after a long illness. She is survived by two nieces, Mrs. Alfred C. Mosher of this city and Miss Janette Mack, of Stanford, Conn., and two nephews, Frank and Fred Mack, of Montrose. The body was removed to the Ackley funeral home, 206 Vestal avenue. Funeral announcements will be made later. 


The Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, Saturday, November 26, 1938

MACK - The funeral of Abbie E. Mack will be held at 10:30 o'clock Monday morning at the Trinity Memorial church. The Rev. Wilson E. Tanner will officiate. Burial will be in Spring Forest cemetery. Arrangements by Claude H. Ackley.


FC11

The Fredonia Censor 21 May 1884, Early History of Hanover, Continued.

John and Holam Vail were natives of Otsego county, this state. At an early day their father with his family emigrated to Alexander, Genesee county, where he engaged in millwright work. He had been a person of large property, but through indorsing for others and an unfortunate contract in building a mill, he had lost nearly all he had. He was regarded as being a first class workman in every respect at the millwright business, and found no difficulty in obtaining employment in his new location. Both his sons, John and Holam, worked with him for three or four years after settling at Alexander, but after a while John became restless and left the parental roof. He found his way to Sackett’s Harbor on Lake Ontario, where he engaged as a ship carpenter through the winter, sailing on Lake Ontario through the season of navigation. He continued this for several years, until he was quite competent at ship building, and capable of commanding a vessel.

During the time he was at Sackett’s Harbor he became acquainted with Miss Panama Fuller, daughter of Capt. Fuller, who commanded a government schooner during the war that had closed a few years previous to that period. Holam Vail continued to reside at Alexander and was employed at millwright work with his father. While there he became acquainted with Mary Buxton and married her in the fall of 1823. Early the next spring he concluded to find a location where his services would be in greater demand or where he could branch out for himself.

Early in April he found his way to this locality, his wife coming in June following. His first employment was in repairing the Fayette Mills for Platt & Levi Rogers. Shortly after this he purchased the site and water power where G. L. Weeks’ grist mill now stands and engaged in building for himself a sawmill. At that time there was a large amount of all the different varieties of timber especially whitewood, black walnut, cherry and oak, and a good demand for sawed lumber. In the spring of 1826 he had his mill in complete running order.

His brother had come from the lower lake and settled here the fall before, and finally talked Holam into building a schooner. This was commenced the first week in May, 1826, and was launched the last of September of the same year. This vessel was called the Victory and was the first that was ever built here. She was for that period a medium sized vessel (about 125 tons burden,) but now would be regarded as little more than a yacht. The ship yard was located on the east bank of the creek near where Charles Hammon now resides. There were several vessels built on the same ground subsequently, all of which were launched into the creek. A channel had to be excavated to let them into the lake.

Although the Victory was launched the last week in September, she was not fully fitted out until the next spring. In building the Victory, Mr. V. had been compelled to get into debt to a considerable extent, and in order to fit out his schooner completely he was obliged to place a mortgage upon it, hoping that if he met with good success he would in a couple of years be able to liquidate and settle up. But fortune frowned upon him, as it had done to several other of this locality who had attempted to accumulate property by the aid of a sailing vessel. After two seasons of varied success, neither of which was very encouraging, Mr. Vail was compelled to succumb, and the schooner Victory, which had cost him considerable money and a large amount of hard labor, became the property of other parties.

Mr. Vail was not left entirely penniless, for he still had his sawmill. Although it was somewhat encumbered, it proved a source of considerable profit to him. There was a good demand for lumber, and the surrounding country supplied him with plenty of logs for sawing. When his time was not required at his mill, he found plenty of employment at millwright work at prices that were quite remunerative. It was but three or four years after the loss of his schooner Victory before he was in quite comfortable circumstances again.

In the summer of 1834 he met with quite a serious accident, which for a time caused great apprehension that he might be deprived of his eye-sight and become totally blind. In addition to millwright work he sometimes worked as a machinist and at the time specified he was engaged in constructing a turning lathe for Luther Heaton and while on some part of this work a small bit of steel about the shape of a flax seed, but not quite so large, flew from the shaft on which he was at work and lodged in the center of his eyeball. There was no physician here that had instruments suitable for extracting it, nor could one be found in Fredonia or Westfield that dared to attempt it. Soon inflammation set in and it became so painful that his attending physician was compelled keep him under the influence of powerful narcotics for some time. The eyeball finally decayed and ran out. The sight, from sympathy, of the other eye was sensibly affected for some time.

Also his general health was seriously impaired for some time, but during the following winter he recuperated so that early the next spring (1835) he purchased from Lyman Howard, Esq., the lot and erected the dwelling house where Mrs. Maria Mixer now resides. At that time this was one of the largest and most pretentious dwelling houses in the village. The large square columns in front, and the general appearance of the house has always attracted the notice of the passer by. Soon after the completion of this home he commenced to erect a building nearly adjoining his sawmill for the manufacture of shoe pegs.

Mr. James Howard had come here a few years previous from Warsaw, Wyoming Co., N.Y., and purchased from Mr. J. M. Wilson the wool-carding and cloth-dressing establishment. In making this purchase Mr. Howard became the owner of the first privilege of the water and in order to run the new enterprise successfully it was necessary to have more power. To obtain this he [Vail] formed a limited co-partnership with Mr. Howard. They soon had their peg factory in operation, employing ten or twelve men.

But once more fortune cast her shadow over Mr. Vail’s enterprise. His building took fire and with all their tools and machinery was consumed, without a dollar of insurance. Many of his best friends thought this was a blow from which he would be unable to rise, but a man of his energy and perseverance could not be kept down. Before the remains of his building had ceased smoldering, he had timber upon the ground for another, and this time decided to increase the size of the building so that it could be used for other manufacturing purposes if required, and before the building was fully enclosed it was decided to turn it into a flouring mill.

To complete this he was compelled to raise money on his homestead, also mortgage his mill property for the security of payment for milling machinery. In a few months he had his mill complete and in running order, but this like nearly every other enterprise in which he engaged did not prove a success. The mill was a good one and did good work, but there were two requisites in which there was a failure. First, there was a lack of water power, and second, a lack of custom. Other localities could purchase wheat and manufacture flour and ship it here at a less cost than it could be done for here.

Still Mr. Vail struggled along for three or four years, but finally was compelled to dispose of his homestead, which was purchased by Harvey Mixer, Esq., of Buffalo for a home for his parents and sister, Miss Maria, who still resides there. This last event appeared to have a more discouraging effect upon Mr. Vail than any of his former troubles. At the time he erected the house he hoped that it would be his home for the remainder of his life. Two or three years after the disposal of his home he succeeded in finding a customer for the mill property at a price something above the mortgage. Soon after this he gathered the remnants of his property together and went to Mayville, this county, where he engaged with two or three others in building a steamboat for Chautauqua Lake. This boat we believe was burned the second season after it was built. His next move was to Columbus, Warren Co. Pa., where he engaged quite extensively in the lumber business, at which he continued until he died, in 1857, aged 54 years. There were but few men known in this section of country who would equal Mr. Vail in accumulating money by their own industry and perseverance. He was peculiarly fortunate in this respect, but equally unfortunate in engaging in enterprises with other parties that proved disastrous, and in a short time all his hard earned accumulations would be swept away.

Capt. John Vail continued to reside here. His summers were spent almost wholly upon the lake, as master of a vessel. He was a part owner of two or three vessels that were built here under his directions. About this time (1835) he conceived the idea of building a small steamboat here to be placed on the route between Barcelona, the lake port for Westfield, and Buffalo, touching at Dunkirk and this place. He was assisted in this enterprise by the Hon. W. F. F. Taylor of Buffalo. The hull of the Taylor was built during the last of the winter and the summer of 1835 on the east bank of the creek where the Lake Shore railroad now crosses the creek. She was towed to Buffalo, where her boilers and machinery were put in, and she was otherwise fitted out, but did not commence running until the spring of 1836, and only continued on the route two seasons. Her engine was of high pressure and not sufficient power, and therefore was too slow and proved a failure. In the spring of 1838 she was taken to Lake Michigan to run between Chicago and New Buffalo, where she was lost by going on to the beach and breaking up in a gale of wind in the fall of ’38.

Capt. John Vail’s next enterprise was purchasing the hull of the steamer Barcelona, which was built to run on the route between the port of that name and Buffalo, but like the Taylor proved too slow and otherwise unsuitable. She was dismantled. Capt. John converted the hull to a sailing vessel and ran it one or two seasons in the lumber trade quite successfully when he disposed of it at a handsome profit above cost to parties in Detroit.

We believe that for the next two or three years he was engaged in sailing vessels for other parties, when in 1844 or 1845 he purchased the hull of the old steamboat Constitution, which had been dismantled on account of her being regarded as unseaworthy, but Capt. Vail succeeded in having the hull partially rebuilt and in purchasing an old engine that had been taken from another steamer. When this was in position, the old steamboat, Constitution, which had withstood so many hard gales of wind and storm was once more placed in commission. This investment did not prove a paying one, and we believe it was not long before the boat was turned over to the creditors of Capt. Vail.

The next we hear of him was about 1850 or 1851. He was engaged in commanding a steamboat on the Sacramento river, California, with headquarters at Sacramento, where he died three or four years after. Capt. John Vail was one of those who had a warm heart for his friends but was exceedingly harsh with his enemies. He was also one who passed through many of the vicissitudes of fortune.

 

 

57 Main Street
Silver Creek, NY  14136
Town of Hanover
The Vail-Mixer-Barresi House

THE MIXER-BARRESI HOUSE

[Excerpted from “Once Upon a Time,” by Marion Thomas, who was the Silver Creek historian in the mid-20th century.]

It is the old homes which enrich the Silver Creek streets giving character and stability to the ever changing scenes of village life and adding a touch of drama with their suggestion of a vanished way of life. It is heartwarming to consider the wealth of hospitality accrued to their century-seasoned, hand-hewn timbers, the Thanksgivings shared, the feasts prepared, the thanks devoutly given. It is a pleasure to let one’s imagination play around the thought of what the early Thanksgivings were like in the Dr. C. Barresi home on Main Street. This fine old landmark was known and loved in earlier days as “The Mixer Place.” Admired for well over a century for its architectural beauty and dignity, this fine old structure was Fayette’s “first mansion.” Although it has passed through many hands and suffered many changes and outrages known as “improvements,” it has remained structurally intact. Thanks to its present owner it has been magnificently restored to both its early beauty and position in life. This early home with its Grecian columns, graceful hand carvings, hand-turned spindles, and hand wrought hardware bears a hint of romance, for it was built by a master shipbuilder in the picturesque days when the harbor life was at its peak with sailing vessels loading and unloading their cargoes at Lee’s Wharf.

The “mansion” was fashioned with pride and care by Holman Vail in 1835, for this was to be his home for all time and for his posterity. Alas, his years of happiness were brief. He invested heavily in “The Victory,” one of the most beautiful and swift ships on the lakes. This proved to be a most unsuccessful business venture, and he lost both the ship and his home, which had been mortgaged to finance “The Victory”. Reluctantly, he sold his stately home in 1844 to Harrison Mixer of Buffalo, a wealthy lumber merchant, whose forebears were a distinguished pioneer family in Hanover Township. The home was purchased for his aging parents and his sister, Maria. Maria was a famous hostess who established a standard of gracious living and lavish hospitality which became a tradition of the house. She often entertained for weeks at a time her niece and namesake, Maria Louise Mixer, only daughter of Harrison Mixer. A great beauty, Maria married a French count of a distinguished line and lived most of her life in a chateau well known in French history. As the Comtesse de Frise, she frequently visited Silver Creek and at her death in 1953 was brought here at her request for burial on the Mixer lot in Glenwood Cemetery.

Upon the death of Maria Mixer in 1889, the house passed into the ownership of Mr. and Mrs. Robins, an older couple who lived with their daughter, Ruby Bennett and her well-known husband, James Bennett. The next owner was Myron Lawrence of Buffalo who was associated with the Montgomery Upholstering Factory. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence were an attractive couple and in a short time were a part of the social life of the town. The house was refurbished; partitions were taken out and others put in; the dirt cellar was extended to accommodate a furnace to heat the first floor. Soon the house was again the scene of frequent entertaining. This period was unfortunately terminated by the burning of the upholstery factory in 1914 or thereabouts. The Lawrences moved to Massachusetts under a somber cloud of misfortune.

Frank Porter, who owned the furniture store and was an undertaker, was the next owner. Being an industrious soul he set about to take out the new partitions and put back some of the old. In the meantime, he ripped out and removed to the barn five of the handmade white enameled mantels which were nothing but a nuisance to him. Being practical minded, he converted the old attached woodshed into a sun room of sorts and raised a section of the roof at the back to provide more height although at the same time sacrificing some of the intriguing, so called, “bellybutton” windows. His most conspicuous change was to convert the pillared front porch into a two storied veranda with a spindled railing around the upper one. He also extended the side stoop to reach the sitting room. This improvement provided ventilation for the middle section of the house besides affording more summer rocking space. Though a quiet living older couple, they were warm-hearted, and their home was always open to their friends. Their hospitality was of a very simple and homespun nature, but it was wholehearted and sincere and prized by those who shared it.

Upon the death of the Porters the home was purchased by Mrs. Porter’s sister, Miss Minnie Shofner, who having always lived in town, was “one of the girls.” Her home now became the center for her old school friends, especially those on Main Street. Tea parties came into their own again as did all day quilting's with boiled dinners and impromptu Sunday night suppers. Like the foregoing owners, upon taking possession Miss Shofner promptly set about making improvements. The old partitions were replaced which restored “Maria’s bedroom” with the bay window off the living room. The mantels were rescued from the barn and replaced where the Porter-made double doors between the parlor and sitting room would permit. The house took on much of the semblance of “The Mixer Place” once more. Minnie fairly reveled in her home in its central location, and she was very proud of her possessions. It was with sad hearts that her contemporaries saw Minnie’s treasured belongings auctioned off from the front veranda one summer day when her estate had to be settled.

The next owners were the Howard Parsons returned from their years in Garden City, Long Island, where Howard’s engineering had taken them. Again life, vitality, music, and fun prevailed, though muted by the depression years and the Second World War. Here young Howard grew up, his friends filled the house with young life. Here too the Garden Club was promoted by Abbey, its founder and first president. In this house also, the Women’s Trio, consisting of Abbey, the late Mabel Horton Plummer, and Helen Clothier with Mary Montgomery as accompanist was formed and practiced regularly. The Parsons were content to limit their changes to redecorating and adding dining room corner cupboards, but for the most part they accepted the house as they found it and preserved “Maria’s bedroom.” With ruffled curtains at the small-paned windows and the white enameled woodwork, the effect was very much that of an early New England home. It was not willingly that the Parsons left their home early in the war years when Howard Sr. was in government service.

A rental period followed. It was by no means the first for the occupancy of the owners had not been continued by any means. During the settling of estates or during long “For Sale” periods it became a tenant house. For one brief period it was a place of business, a funeral home. It had also been a tourist home, a headquarters for the state police stationed here; and at one time it was made into an upper and lower apartment so that two families were accommodated. This house which was destined for a “mansion,”  and in 1860 was described as “the largest and most impressive dwelling in the village” had its vicissitudes and knew the deterioration which comes with disregard or disinterested temporary occupants. There were times when creeping age and the rental pain and sagging timbers were only too apparent. When Dr. C. S. Barresi returned from World War II, he bought the house in 1945. With the ownership of Dr. Barresi and his wife, Mabel, came the renewed beauty, dignity and prestige of the earliest years. Neither money nor pains were spared in the restoration of this fine old example of early Fayette building while adapting it to modern living, comfort and convenience.

While Holman Vail or Maria Mixer would never recognize the interior with its absence of the many little mantels and the parlor, sitting room and Maria’s bedroom ill as one spacious living room with a picture window, they would still find much unchanged. The charm of this fine old home lies not only in its architectural beauty with its stately columns and proud bearings, but in its atmosphere redolent of the years and the lives of those who fashioned and preserved it through its one hundred forty years. No, it is not hard to imagine the early Thanksgivings when Holman Vail was still the prosperous shipbuilder and mill owner (where the Excelco plant now is) and the following forty-five years of the Mixer’s privileged life. And it isn’t hard to think of the Barresi home with added respect as the memorial to Holman Vail, master shipbuilder in the glorious Harbor Days of 1835. (For any who are interested, Vail recouped his losses at a later date and was once again a man of wealth.) [Published November 1958.]