Abigail Elizabeth Altenburg




Charles Nitzer Fancher was born March 28, 1823, in Bridgewater, Susquehanna Co., PA, and died March 11, 1869, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 45. Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. He is the son of John Fancher of Sussex, Sussex Co., NJ, and Phoebe Coon of Braintrim, Wyoming Co., PA.

Emma Calista Starkweather was born April 14, 1828, in Chenango Co., NY, and died March 26, 1865, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 36. She is the daughter of Reuben Starkweather of Preston, New London Co., CT, and Esther Moore of Chatham, Columbia Co., NY.

Charles Nitzer Fancher and Emma Calista Starkweather were married August 8, 1848, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Charles Nitzer Fancher and Emma Calista (Starkweather) Fancher had four children:

  1. Hermann Fancher: Born December 18, 1850, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY; Died March 15, 1852, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 1).
  2. Earnest Charles Fancher: Born September 26, 1852, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY; Died June 20, 1891, in Henrietta, Clay Co., TX (age 40). Married (1) 1883, to Virginia Adams: Born about 1861 in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY; Died 1887, in Henrietta, Clay Co., TX (about age 26). Married (2) September 26, 1888, in Clay Co., TX, to Susan Sophrona Lutitia Belzora Reeves: Born September 6, 1869, in Alma, Crawford Co., AR; Died December 9, 1939, in Enid, Garfield Co., OK (age 70).
  3. Arthur Edson Fancher: Born March 7, 1854, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY; Died October 5, 1923,  at his home, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 69). Married October, 1883, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, to Edith Henrietta McGraw: Born February, 1856, in New York; Died July 16, 1903, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 49).
  4. Alvin Devereux Fancher: Born September 30, 1857, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY; Died January 13, 1927, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 69). Buried in Floral Park Cemetery, Johnson City, Broome Co., NY. Married February 15, 1881, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, to Harriet McElroy: Born December 11, 1859, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY; Died January 17, 1948, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 88). Buried in Floral Park Cemetery, Johnson City, Broome Co., NY.

After Emma Calista (Starkweather) Fancher died, Charles Nitzer Fancher married Abigail E. Altenburg.

Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" Altenburg was born June 14, 1832, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada, and died July 24, 1924, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 92. Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. She is the daughter of Daniel David Altenburg of Ballston, Saratoga Co., NY, and Elizabeth Fancher of Roxbury, Morris Co., NJ.

Edwin Vail was born about 1831 in Silver Creek, Chautauqua Co., NY, and died after 1865 in Unknown, at age Unknown. He is the son of Hollum "Holam" Vail of New York, and Mary Buxton of Lowell, MA. Hollum "Holam" Vail was born October 14, 1804, in Ostego Co., NY, and died February 14, 1857, in Warren Co., PA, at age 52. Buried in Westfield Cemetery, Westfield, Chautauqua Co., NY.

Edwin Vail and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" Altenburg were married about 1852 in New York.

Edwin Vail and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) Vail may have had one child:

  1. Lydia J. Vail: Born about 1853, in New York; Died after 1860, in Unknown, possibly in Illinois.

Edwin Vail and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) Vail were divorced about 1862 in Warren Co., PA.

Charles Nitzer Fancher and Edson Scott Fancher are Fancher brothers who married Altenburg/Abbey sisters.

Emma Calista (Starkweather) Fancher died, Charles Nitzer Fancher married Abigail E. Altenburg.

Charles Nitzer Fancher then married Abigail E. "Abbie" (Altenburg) Vail.

Charles Nitzer Fancher and Abigail E. "Abbie" (Altenburg) Vail were married 1867 in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Charles Nitzer Fancher and Abigail E. "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) Fancher had one child:

  1. Margaret Altenburg Fancher: Born about 1867 in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY; Died after 1880, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

After Charles Nitzer Fancher died, Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) Fancher married Charles Geer Merrill.

Charles Geer Merrill was born about 1831, in Pennsylvania, and died March 5, 1891, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 60. He is the son of Jonathan Harris Merrill, MD, of Haverhill, Essex Co., MA, and Lucy Fitch Geer of Brooklyn, Susquehanna Co., PA. In the 1850 U. S. Census Lucy Merrill was listed as "insane."

Charles Geer Merrill and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) Fancher were married after 1883, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) (Fancher) Merrill then married Spencer L. Woodworth.

Spencer L. Woodworth was born July 6, 1831, in Cattaraugus Co., NY, and died April 29, 1902, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 70. Buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA. He is the son of Zebedee C. Woodworth of Rensselaerville, Albany Co., NY, and Susannah "Susan" Unknown, of Rhode Island. In 1860 Susan was listed as having Sickness Insane.  

Frances L. Parks was born December 13, 1838, in Cherry Creek, Chautauqua Co., NY, and died March 13, 1901, in Iowa, at age 62. Buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA. She is the daughter of Ora Parks of Ontario Co., NY, and Almira Cain of Vermont.

Spencer L. Woodworth and Frances L. Parks were married about 1854 in New York.

Spencer L. Woodworth and Frances L. (Parks) Woodworth had one child:

  1. Antionette Sophia "Nettie" Woodworth: Born January 30, 1860, in Leon Twp., Monroe Co., WI; Died March 5, 1936, in Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA (age 76). Buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA. Married February 27, 1884, in Pleasant Belly Twp., Webster Co., IA, to Orrin Leander Reed: Born October 27, 1859, in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co., MI; Died July 4, 1935, in Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA (age 75). Buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA.

After Frances L. (Parks) Woodworth died, Spencer L. Woodworth married Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) (Fancher) Merrill.

Spencer L. Woodworth and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) (Fancher) Merrill were married February 4, 1902, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Spencer L. Woodworth and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) (Fancher) (Merrill) Woodworth had no children.




TIMELINE

https://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html

Ontario was known as: "Upper Canada" from December 26, 1791, to February 10, 1841; "Canada West" from February 10, 1841, to July 1, 1867; and "Ontario" after July 1, 1867.

Hollum "Holam" Vail was born October 14, 1804, in Ostego Co., NY, and died February 14, 1857, in Warren Co., PA, at age 52. Buried in Westfield Cemetery, Westfield, Chautauqua Co., NY.

Mary Buxton was born January 20, 1807, in Lowell, Middlesex Co., MA, and died July 31, 1897, in the Village of Silver Creek, Town of Hanover, Chautauqua Co., NY, at age 91. Buried in Glenwood cemetery, Silver Creek, Chautauqua Co., NY.

Holam "Hollum" Vail (age 19), a bachelor, and Mary Buxton (age 16), a maiden, were married on Dec. 30, 1823, in the village of Alexandria, Genesee Co., NY.

Holam "Hollum" Vail and Mary (Buxton) Vail had three children:

  1. Cordelia "Delia" Vail: Born February, 1824, in Mayville, Chautauqua Co., NY; Died September 15, 1900, in Chicago Junction, Lucas Co., OH (age 76). Married October 15, 1847, in Mayville, Chautauqua Co., NY, to Luther Mitchell Skidmore: Born October 4, 1821, in Siloam, Madison Co., NY; Died December 6, 1896, in Toledo, Lucas Co., OH (age 75).
  2. Unknown Vail: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.
  3. Edwin Vail: Born about 1831, in New York; Died after 1862, in Unknown. Married about 1852 in New York, to Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" Altenburg: Born June 14, 1832, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died July 24, 1924, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY (age 92). Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Index of Deeds, Chautauqua Co., NY, 1830 - 1870.


Luther Mitchell Skidmore, Jr. (son of 'Wolcott and Delia Skidmore), was born October 4, 1821, at Siloam, N. Y. He married Delia Vail at Mayville, N. Y., October 15, 1848. He died at Chicago Junction, Ohio, December 6, 1896, aged seventy-five years. His wife died on September 15, 1900, aged seventy-six years, seven months. Luther M. Skidmore, Jr., went west in 1848, locating at St. Clair, Mich. In 1857 he removed to Toledo, Ohio, where he was engaged in the lumber and manufacturing business and became very prosperous ; he was also interested in "lake carrying," owning two large schooners. In 1871 he was one of the organizers of the Adams Street Mission at Toledo, Ohio. He was interested in benevolent and religious work all his life, and his death was the occasion of an impressive memorial service at the Adams Street Mission, Toledo, Ohio, in which many well-known gentlemen participated, who testified to the high character of their associate of twenty years in benevolent work. 

LUTHER MITCHELL8 SKIDMORE was born 4 October 1821 at Siloam, Madison County, New York, the son of Wolcott (no. 283) and Adelia (Mallory) Skidmore. He died 6 December 1896 at Chicago Junction (near Toledo), Lucas County, Ohio. He married Cordelia (Delia), a daughter of Holland and Mary (Buxton) Vail of Chautauqua County, New York, on 15 November 1847. They were married at Mayville in that county according to a newspaper account of the ceremony. She was born in February 1824 and died 15 September 1900. She was living at her death with her son Wendell P. Skidmore at Chicago Junction. He moved in 1848 to St. Clair, St. Clair County, Michigan, but he and his wife were back living with his father-in-law, a captain of a steamboat, in the 1850 census of Chautauqua Township, Chautauqua County. They went in 1857 to Toledo, Ohio, where he opened a timber yard in 1862 with Nelson Mills, and owned two schooners sailing on the Great Lakes. During the Civil War he was on a committee in the Fourth Ward of Toledo to raise money for the needy families of soldiers away with the army. In 1871 he was one of the organizers of the Adams Street Mission in Toledo, and was interested in benevolent work all his life. He and his son Wendell F. Skidmore were living at 191 Washington Street in the Eighth Ward of Toledo in 1880, and in 1890 had an office at 361 S. Erie Street, and resided at 902 Vinton Street.

 


A bird's eye view of the the Village of Silver Creek, Town of Hanover, Chautauqua Co., NY, in 1892.


The Fredonia Censor, Fredonia, Chautauqua Co., NY, Wednesday May 21, 1884

Early History of Hanover. CONTINUED.

John and Holam Vail were natives of Otsego county, this state. At an early day their father with his family emigrated to Alexander, Genesee county, where he engaged in mill-wright work. He had been a person of large property, but through indorsing for others and an unfortunate contract in building a mill, he had lost nearly all he had. He was regarded as being a first class workman in every respect at the millwright business, and found no difficulty in obtaining employment in his new location. Both his sons, John and Holam, worked for him for three or four years after settling at Alexander, but after a while John became restless and left the parental roof. He found his way to Sackett's Harbor on Lake Ontario, where he engaged as a ship carpenter through the winter, sailing on Lake Ontario through the season of navigation. He continued this for several years, until he was quite competent at ship building, and capable of commanding a vessel. During the time he was at Sackett's Harbor he became acquainted with Miss Panama Fuller, daughter of Capt. Fuller, who commanded a government schooner during the war that had closed a few years previous to that period. Holam Vail continued to reside at Alexander and was employed at mill-wright work with his father. While there he became acquainted with Mary Buxton and married her in the fall of 1823. Early the next spring he concluded to find a new location where his services would be in greater demand or where he could branch out for himself. Early in April he found his way to this locality, his wife coming in June following. His first employment was in repairing the Fayette Mills for Platt & Levi Rogers. Shortly after this he purchased the site and water power where G. L. Weeks' grist mill now stands and engaged in building for himself a sawmill. At that time there was a large amount of all different varieties of timber, especially whitewood, black walnut, cherry and oak, and a good demand for sawed lumber. In the spring of 1826 he had his mill in complete running order. His brother had come over from the lower lake and settled here the fall before, and finally talked Holam into building a schooner. This was commenced the first week in May, 1826, and was launched the last of September of the same year. This vessel was called the Victory and was the first that was ever built here. She was for that time a medium sized vessel (about 125 tons burden,) but now would be regarded as little more than a yacht. The ship yard was located on the east bank of the creek near where Charles Hammon now resides. There were several vessels built on the same ground subsequently, all of which were launched into the creek. A channel had to be excavated to let them into the lake. Although the Victory was launched the last week in September, she was not fully fitted out until the next spring. In building the Victory Mr. V. had been compelled to get into debt to a considerable extent, and in order to fit out his schooner completely he was obliged to place a mortgage upon it, hoping that if he met with good success he would in a couple of years be able to liquidate and settle up. But fortune frowned upon him, as it had done to several others of this locality who had attempted to accumulate property by the aid of a sailing vessel. After two seasons of varied success, neither of which was very encouraging, Mr. Vail was compelled to succumb, and the schooner Victory, which had cost him considerable money and a large amount of hard labor, became the property of other parties. Mr. Vail was not left entirely penniless, for he still had his sawmill. Although it was somewhat encumbered, it proved a source of considerable profit to him. There was a good demand for lumber, and the surrounding country supplied him with plenty of logs for sawing. When his time was not required at his mill, he found plenty of employment at mill-wright work at prices that were quite remunerative. It was but three or four years after the loss of his schooner Victory before he was in quite comfortable circumstances again. In the summer of 1834 he met with quite a serious accident, which, for a time caused great apprehension that he might be deprived of his eye-sight and become totally blind. In addition to mill-wright work he sometimes worked as a machinist and at the time specified he was engaged in constructing a turning lathe for Luther Heaton and while on some part of this work a small bit of steel about the shape of a flax seed, but not quite so large, flew from the shaft on which he was at work and lodged in the center of the eyeball. There was no physician here that had instruments suitable for extracting it, nor could one be found in Fredonia or Westfield that dared to attempt it. Soon inflammation set in and it became so painful that his attending physician was compelled to keep him under the influence of powerful narcotics some some time. The eyeball finally decayed and ran out. The sight, from sympathy of the other eye, was sensibly affected for some time. Also his general health was seriously impaired for some time, but during the following winter he reenperated so that early the next spring (1835), he purchased from Lyman Howard, Esq., the lot and erected the house where Miss Maria Mixer now resides. At that time this was one of the largest and pretentious dwelling houses in this village. The large square columns in front and the general appearance of the house has always attracted the notice of the passerby. Soon after the completion of the home he commenced to erect a building nearly adjoining his sawmill for the manufacture of shoe pegs. Mr. James Howard had come here a few years previous from Warsaw, Wyoming county, N. Y., and purchased from Mr. J. M. Wilson the wool-carding and cloth-dressing establishment. In making this purchase Mr. Howard became the owner of the first privilege on the water and in order to run the new enterprise successfully it was necessary to have more power. To obtain this he formed a limited co-partnership with Mr. Howard. The soon had their peg factory in operation, employing ten or twelve men. But once more fortune cast her shadows over Mr. Vail's enterprise. His building took fire and with all of their tools and machinery was consumed, without a dollar of insurance. Many of his best friends thought this was a blow from which he would be unable to rise, but a man of his energy and perseverance could not be kept down. Before the remains of his building had ceased smoldering, he had timber upon the ground for another, and this time decided to increase the size of the building so that it could be used for other manufacturing purposes if required, and before the building was fully enclosed it was decided to turn it into a flouring mill. To complete this he was compelled to raise money on his homestead, and mortgage his mill property for the security of payment of milling machinery. In a few months he had his mill complete and in running order, but this like nearly every other enterprise in which he engaged did not prove a success. The mill was a good one and did good work, but there were two requisites in which there was a failure. First, there was a lack of water power, and second, a lack of custom. Other localities could purchase wheat and manufacture flour and ship it here at a less cost than it could be done for here. Still Mr. Vail struggled along for three or four years, but finally was compelled to dispose of his homestead, which was purchased by Harvey Mixer, Esq., of Buffalo, for a home for his parents and sister, Miss Maria who still resides there. This last event appears to have a more discouraging effect upon Mr. Vail than any of his former troubles. At the time he erected the house he hoped that it would be his home for the remainder of his life. Two or three years after the disposal of the home he succeeded a customer for the mill property at a price something above the mortgage. Soon after this he gathered the remnants of his property together and went to Mayville, this county, where he engaged with two or three others in building a steamboat for Chautauqua lake. This boat we believe was burned the second season after it was built. His next move was to Columbus, Warren county, Pa., where he engaged in the lumber business, at which he continued until he died, in 1857, aged 54 years. There were few men known in this section of country who would equal Mr. Vail in accumulating money by their own industry and perseverance. He was peculiarly fortunate in this respect, but equally unfortunate in engaging in enterprises with other parties, that proved disastrous, and in a short time, all his hard earned accumulations would be swept away.


 

Probably no period in Silver Creek life was ever as picturesque as that of the Harbour Days: the busy wharf heaped with barrels, casks, kegs and chests; the warehouse with its office of “Counting House” flanked with high piles of outgoing lumber; the colorful “Steamboat Hotel” with its changing clientele and sometimes staggering seamen; the shipbuilding going on in the background, with masts and spars Iending romance to the scene.

As early as 1826, before Mr. Lee ever set forth upon the fateful Sunday walk that brought him to Silver Creek, shipbuilding was in progress. The ship-yard was erected on the east side of Silver Creek not far below the juncture of Walnut Creek, very much on a line with the Rumsey Street of today. Here the well-known “Victory” was started in May 1826 and successfully launched in September. The owner and first ship builder, Mr. Holman Vail, a millwright and native of Otsego County had to have the channel excavated to permit the ship to enter the lake. With this channel deepened, a more ideal location for a ship yard could not be desired. It was as ideal for Mr. Vail’s purpose as the bay with its protecting west cliff was to be for Mr. Lee. Though this first ship was lost by its owner because of the great expense involved and two unsuccessful shipping seasons, it was a very fine vessel indeed. It had a fine record through the years and was the forerunner of others which were to come from that same shipyard. The schooner “Victory” has gone down in history as the first lake vessel to be built in Silver Creek and the first sail craft to be floated from our creek. Holman Vail with his brother John have also their place in history as the pioneer shipbuilders; there were none before them.

Fortunately for the Vails whose all had been lost with the “Victory”, as well as their heart for shipbuilding, Mr. Lee was not interested in lake commerce alone. Before he ever saw Silver Creek’s bay, he was already part owner of the “Liberty”, a successful coasting trade vessel running between Ashtabula, Ohio and Buffalo in 1826 when the Vails were just entering the shipbuilding business. With Mr. Lee’s coming in 1828 came encouragement for the Vails and a new impetus for shipbuilding. Mr. Lee’s shipping experience proved how successful a coasting trade schooner could be, and it renewed the Vails’ zest for building. With his interest, encouragement and financial backing, the Vails again applied their skills to the building of other schooners. Emphasis enough cannot be laid upon the new prosperity and development which came to Silver Creek with the advent of Mr. Lee and his mercantile interests and ambitions for shipbuilding and shipping life. To his far vision, perseverance and gift for organization, the growth of the village is indebted.

As a result of Mr. Lee’s backing of the Vail brothers, between the years of 1828 and 1844 there were fourteen or fifteen different sail and steam boats built and launched at this port. Those must have been thrilling days -- the day of the year when the annual launching took place! How the date must have been rumored through the countryside and how eagerly the settlers must have assembled on the creek bank and shore to watch the schooner’s launching!

Launchings, coast trading, water travel; sails, rigging, schooners, and steamboats; humming wharfs and bulging warehouse; captains, seamen, wharfhands and teamsters; excitement, risk, romance and high adventure -- these were the ingredients of harbour life when Silver Creek’s shipbuilding and commerce ranked with the best known on the Lakes.

Real fortunes were made in that day by wharf masters and fortunate ship owners for each ship was individually owned, partnership owned or owned by a private company; there were no shipping lines in existence then. Fortunes were made and alas in many cases lost, for all was not flamboyant success even in that shipping hey-day. Ships sank at sea; schooners were battered against the cliffs; boilers exploded and steamers went up in flames; many a hopeless passenger clung to a floating spar in vain.

Shipwrecks, disasters and heroic rescues had their place in the harbour life saga. One ghastly August morning in 1841, two hundred fifty bodies washed up onto Silver Creek’s shores. This was due to a flaming excursion boat, the Erie”, which failed to reach shore before it was consumed. Yes, industry, success, prosperity, fame and tragedy were all known to this port.

Gone now are the wharf and the beacon, the warehouse, hotel and shipyard. Gone are the lighthouse and the lights far-streaming. The railroad embankment has supplemented the wharf; the trains have succeeded the sailing schooners; the warehouse has been replaced by the Fish and Game Club House on its very site; and the hotel has given way to a line of tourists’ lodgings. The cliffs are with us still, their dignity little impaired with age; the bay is as magnificent as in days of yore; the curve of the shoreline is as graceful as ever. The creeks still empty into the bay; the’ sun still sets behind the point; and the afterglow still dyes sky and water alike in indescribable hues as it did in the busiest shipping days of the 1830’s.

Gone, too, is Mr. Lee, that remarkable figure of business genius who was not only responsible for the wharf, all the commercial life of that day, and the success of the shipyards, but for all the thriving prosperity they brought to the whole, far-reaching locality. He established the first permanent general store, the first real hotel, the first bank (second in the county), promoted the first church (Presbyterian, 1831). He laid out Dunkirk Street and extended Main Street to meet it, thus creating the intersection which, before the Thruway, reputedly was the busiest traffic center in the state, outside of New York City. With his genius for organization his lake shore settlement and the original upper Main Street settlement were drawn into one united community and incorporated as the Village of Silver Creek in 1848.

Published July 1953.

Charles Nitzer Fancher was born March 28, 1823, in Bridgewater, Susquehanna Co., PA.

Emma Calista Starkweather was born April 14, 1828, in Chenango Co., NY.

Charles Geer Merrill was born about 1831, in Pennsylvania.

Spencer L. Woodworth was born July 6, 1831, in Cattaraugus Co., NY.

Edwin Vail was born about 1831 in New York.

Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" Altenburg was born June 14, 1832, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada

Phineas Winters Abbey and Elizabeth (Fancher) Altenburg were married about 1834 in New York, or in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Spencer l. Edson Scott Fancher was born November 23, 1834, in Bridgewater, Susquehanna Co., PA.

Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey was born September, 1836, in Hope Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Frances L. Parks was born December 13, 1838, in Cherry Creek, Chautauqua Co., NY.

The 1840 U. S. Census taken on 1840, shows Phineas Abbey is living in Ellicott, Chautauqua Co., NY. Living there are: 1 Male age 30 - 39; 1 male age 10 - 14; 1 Female age 30 - 39; 1 female age 10 - 14; 1 female age 5 - 9; and 1 female under 5.

The 1840 U. S. Census taken on 1840, shows Holland Vail is living in Hanover, Chautauqua Co., NY. Living there are: 1 Male age 30 - 39; 1 male age 20 - 29, 1 male age 5 - 9; 1 Female age 30 - 39; 2 females age 15 - 19, and 1 female age 10 - 14.


The Mayville Sentinel, Mayville, Chautauqua Co., NY, July 3, 1850

PLEASURE EXCURSION ON CHAUTAUQUA LAKE.

The new Steamer HOLLUM VAIL, EDWIN VAIL, Master, will leave Jamestown on the morning of the 4th, at 10 o'clock, and touch at Fluvanna, Ashville, Bemus', Long and Fair Points, spend a short time at Mayville, and return to Jamestown in the afternoon. Tickets for the trip, 50 cents.


The 1850 U. S. Census taken on September 10, 1850, shows Phineas Abbey (age 43) born in Canada, is a Farmer, and is living in Randolph Twp., Cattaraugus Co., NY. Living with him are: Elizabeth Abbey (age 52) born in New Jersey; Elizabeth Altenbaugh (age 21) born in Canada; Jane Altenbaugh (age 19) born in Canada; Abigail Altenbaugh (age 17) born in Canada; Polly Altenbaugh (age 14) born in New York; Isaac Stanly (age 33) born in New York, a Farmer; Luther Stanly (age 8) born in New York; and Joseph Stanly (age 8) born in New York.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on October 26, 1850, shows Hollum Vail (age 46) born in New York, is a Captain of a Steam Boat, and is living in Chautauqua, Chautauqua Co., NY. Living with him are: Mary Vail (age 42) born in Massachusetts; Luther Skidmore (age 28) born in New York; Cordelia Skidmore (age 26) born in New York; Edwin Vail (age 13) born in New York, a Labourer; and Adison Wever (age 17) born in New York, a Labourer.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on September 3, 1850, shows Ory Parks (age 44) born in New York, and with real estate of $2,200 is a Farmer, and is living in Cherry Creek Twp., Chautauqua Co., NY. Living with him are: Almira Parks (age 39) born in Vermont; Walter Parks (age 20) born in New York, a Farm Laborer; Frances Parks (age 14) born in New York; Huldah A. Parks (age 12) born in New York; Frances Parks (age 14) born in New York; Mahala A. Parks (age 8) born in New York; Jabz. Parks (age 5) born in New York; and Melissa Parks (age 4) born in New York.

The 1850 U. S. Census Census taken on August 6, 1850, shows Jonas Mack (age 38) born in Pennsylvania, and with Real Estate of $2,000 is a married Wheelwright, and is living in Montrose Borough, Susquehanna Co., PA. Living with him are: a female, Olive A. Mack (age 32) born in Pennsylvania; Mary Mack (age 7) born in Pennsylvania, Theodore Mack (age 4) born in Pennsylvania; Josephine Mack (age 3/12) born in Pennsylvania; and seven others.

The 1850 U. S. Census Census taken on August 12, 1850, shows Jonathan H. Merrill (age 48) born in Maine, and with Real Estate of $6,000 is a Physician, and is living in Salem, Rockingham Co., NH. Living with him are: Lucy F. Merrill (age 47) born in Pennsylvania (listed as Insane); Charles G. Merrill (age 18) born in Pennsylvania, a Student; George W. Merrill (age 16) born in New Hampshire, a Student; Rebecca R. Merrill (age 12) born in New Hampshire; and Rebecca Merrill (age 80) born in Maine.

The 1850 U. S. Census Census taken on August 10, 1850, shows Harriett A. Wheeler (age 45) born in New Hampshire, is the Head of Household, and is living in Salem, Rockingham Co., NH. Living with her are: Amos Wheeler (age 21) born in New Hampshire, a Shoemaker; Emerline F. Wheeler (age 19) born in New Hampshire; Asa Wheeler (age 17) born in New Hampshire, a Shoemaker; Hannah J. Wheeler (age 12) born in New Hampshire; and Wm. H. Wheeler (age 9) born in New Hampshire.

Edwin Vail and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" Altenburg were married about 1852 in New York.

Charles Geer Merrill (age 22) of Salem, NH, and Emerline F. Wheeler (age 23) of Salem, NH, were married October 16, 1854, in Salem, Rockingham Co., NH.


Charles Geer Merrill and Emerline F. Wheeler Marriage Record.


The 1855 New York State Census Census taken on June 8, 1855, shows Spencer Woodworth (age 25) born in Cattaraugus Co., NY, and having been a resident of Cattaraugus Co., NY, for 25 years, is a married Labour, and is living in a frame house worth $1,000 and is living in the Town of Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., NY. Living with him is his wife, Frances Woodworth (age 18) born in Chautauqua Co., NY,

Hollum "Holam" Vail died February 14, 1857, in Warren Co., PA, at age 53. Buried in Westfield Cemetery, Westfield, Chautauqua Co., NY.


The Warren Mail, Warren, Warren Co., PA, May 9, 1857

Administrators Notice.

LETTERS of Administration on the estate of Hollum Vail, deceased, having been granted to the undersigned, all persons indebted to said estate are requested to make payment to us forthwith at Columbus, and all persons having claims against it will present them for payment at the same place.

HOLLIS KING. MARY VAIL, Admr's. Columbus, April 28, 1857.


The Warren Mail, Warren, Warren Co., PA, November 11, 1858

The land owned by Edwin Vail was foreclosed upon about November, 1858. Edwin Vail purchased this land in 1854.


Edson Scott Fancher and Pauline Lorinda "Polly" Abbey were married November 27, 1858, in Columbus, Warren Co., PA.

The 1860 U. S. Census Census taken on June 11, 1860, shows Edwin Vail (age 29) born in New York, and with Real Estate of $300 and Personal Estate of $100 is an Engineer, and is living in Cairo, Alexander Co., IL. Living with him are: Elizabeth Vail (age 28) born in New York; and Lydia J. Vail (age 7) born in New York.

The 1860 U. S. Census Census taken on June 21, 1860, shows Jonas Mack (age 47) born in Pennsylvania, and with Real Estate of $5,000 and Personal Estate of $2,850 is a Farmer, and is living in Bridgewater, Susquehanna Co., PA. Living with him are: a married female, Olive A. Mack (age 42) born in Pennsylvania; Theodore Mack (age 14) born in Pennsylvania; Josephin Mack (age 10) born in Pennsylvania; George Mack (age 6) born in Pennsylvania; Theodore Mack (age 14) born in Pennsylvania; G. W. Arnold (age 23) born in Pennsylvania, a Farm Laborer; and Charles Potter (age 19) born in Pennsylvania, a Farm Laborer.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on June 21, 1860, shows John Fancher (age 74) born in New Jersey, is a Farmer, and is living in Bridgewater Twp., Susquehanna Co., PA. Living with him are: Edson S. Fancher (age 26) born in Pennsylvania, and with Real Estate of $2,500 and Personal Estate of $700, a Farmer; and Paulena Fancher (age 37) born in New York.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 7, 1860, shows P. W. Abbey (age 60) born in New York, and with Real Estate of $600 and Personal Estate of $150 is a Farmer, and is living in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA. Living with him are: Elizabeth Abbey (age 65) born in New York; and Elizabeth Altenberg (age 27) born in Canada, a Domestic.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 7, 1860, shows P. W. Abbey (age 60) born in New York, and with Real Estate of $600 and Personal Estate of $150 is a Farmer, and is living in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA. Living with him are: Elizabeth Abbey (age 65) born in New York; and Abigail Altenberg (age 27) born in Canada, a Domestic.

Leigh Larson note: Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) Vail had apparently already separated from her husband, Edwin Vail, and was using her maiden  name of Abigail Elizabeth Altenburg.


The Warren Mail, Warren, Warren Co., PA, Saturday, May 17, 1862

Proclamation.

In Warren County, Common Pleas. No. 4, Dec. Term, 1861. Libel in Divorce &c. Subpoena and ahas Subpoena returned Nihil.

Abigail Vail, by her next friend, Phineas Abbey Libellant, versus Edwin Vail Respondent.

To Edwin Vail, Respondent. You are hereby notified to be and appear in the Court of Common Pleas of Warren County on or before the first Monday of June next to answer the complaint of said Abigail Vail, Libellant in the above case.

Witness my hand and seal at Warren this 5th day of May, 1862. H. P. KINNEAR, Shff. L. S.


Norman Spink and Mary (Buxton) Vail were married October 22, 1861, in Lucas Co., OH, by E. B. Morrison, Jr.

Edwin Vail and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) Vail were divorced about 1862 in Warren Co., PA.


Charles Geer Merrill of New Milford Borough, Susquehanna Co., PA, a married Depot Agent, was registered for the Civil War Draft during June, 1863.


Edwin Vail was living in Momence, Kankakee Co., IL. when he enlisted in the Civil War from Illinois. There was a Edward "Ed" Vail that died November 17, 1895, and is buried in the Poor Farm Cemetery, Edwardsville Cemetery, Edwardsville, Madison Co., IL.


       

Edwin Vail Civil War enlistment and discharge records.


Overview of the Illinois 120th Regiment Infantry in the Civil War.

Organized at Camp Butler, Ill., by consolidation of 7 Companies recruited for 120th Infantry at Vienna, Ill., and 3 Companies recruited for the 132nd Infantry at Shawneetown, Ill. Mustered in October 28, 1862. Guard railroad bridge at Jimtown until November 9, 1862. Moved to Alton, II1., November 9; thence to Memphis, Tenn. Attached to 1st Brigade, District of Memphis, Tenn., 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Memphis, 13th Array Corps, to December. District of Memphis, Tenn., 16th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, District of Memphis, 5th Division, 16th Army Corps, to May, 1863. Detached Brigade, District of Northeast Louisiana, to August, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to December, 1863. Post of Corinth, Miss., 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, District of Memphis, Tenn., 16th Army Corps, to June, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Sturgis' Expedition, June, 1864. 1st Brigade, Post of Memphis, District of West Tennessee, to February, 1865. Unassigned Post of Memphis, Tenn., to June, 1865. 1st Infantry Brigade, District of West Tennessee, to September, 1865.

SERVICE.--Garrison and Provost duty at Memphis, Tenn., November 14, 1862, until May, 1863. Expedition to Marion, Ark., January 13-15, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May. Siege operations against Vicksburg May to July. Greenville, Miss., May 12. Moved to La Grange, Tenn., July 28-August 2; thence to Memphis, Tenn., and duty there until November. Expedition into Mississippi October 10-21. Guard train to Corinth, Miss., October 30-November 5. Moved to Corinth November 7, and Post duty there until January 25, i864. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., January 25, and Provost duty there until June. Sturgis' Expedition to Guntown June 1-13. Brice's (or Tishamingo) Creek, near Guntown, June 10. Ripley June 11. At Memphis, Tenn., until September 30. Repulse of Forrest's attack on Memphis August 21. Moved to Cairo, Ill., September 30-October 1; thence to Paducah, Ky., October 2-3. Moved to Clifton, Tenn., October 3-6; to Florence October 8. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, thence to Johnsonville October 8-11. Moved to Memphis October 21-23, and Provost duty there until September, 1865. Mustered out September 7, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 20 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 261 Enlisted men by disease. Total 285.


The 1865 New York State Census Census taken on June 10, 1865, shows Chas. N. Fancher (age 42) born in Pennsylvania, and having been married one time, and the father of 4 children, and now widowed, and who owns a brick house worth $6,000 and is living in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Living with him are: his son, Arthur Fancher (age 10) born in Broome Co., NY; his son, Earnest Fancher (age 12) born in Broome Co., NY; his son, Alvin Fancher (age 7) born in Broome Co., NY; and an unmarried servant, Elizabeth Fisher (age 18) born in Pennsylvania.

Charles Nitzer Fancher and Abigail E. (Abbey) (Altenburg) Vail were married about 1866 in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Margaret Altenburg Fancher was born about 1867 in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Charles Nitzer Fancher died March 11, 1869, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 45. Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 11, 1870, shows Gordon S. Fancher (age 36) born in Pennsylvania, and with Real Estate of $1,500 and Personal Estate of $300 is a Farmer, and is living in Gordon Twp., Todd Co., MN. Living with him are: Pauline D. Fancher (age 34) born in New York, who is Keeping House; and Eddie Fancher (age 4) born in Minnesota.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 23, 1870, shows shows Charles E. Merrell (age 38) born in Pennsylvania, and with Personal Estate of $300 is a Clerk in a Store, and is living in a hotel run by Charles M. Cafferty, 2nd Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on September 18, 1870, shows T. W.  Aby (age 67) born in Upper Canada, and with father and mother of foreign birth, and with Real Estate of $1,400 and Personal Estate of $780 is a Farmer, and is living in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA. Living with him is: Elizabeth Aby (age 76) born in New Jersey, who is Keeping House.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on July 9, 1870, shows Abbey Fancher (age 38) born in Canada, and with Real Estate of $2,000 and Personal Estate of $1,500 is the Head of Household, and does Housekeeping, and is living in the 3rd Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Living with her are: Alvin Fancher (age 13) born in New York; Margaret Fancher (age 2) born in New York; Elizabeth Mack (age 40) born in Canada, and with Personal Estate of $1,200 does Housekeeping; Ebby E. Mack (age 7) born in Pennsylvania; Archie Mack (age 4) born in Pennsylvania; and numerous others.

The 1875 New York State Census taken on June 1, 1875, shows Jonas Mack (age 62) born in Pennsylvania, is a married Wagon Maker, and is living in a brick house worth $11,000 and is living in the 3rd Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Living with him are: his wife, Elizabeth Mack (age 45) born in Canada; his daughter, Abby E. Mack (age 12) born in Broome Co., NY; his son, Archie H. Mack (age 9) born in Broome Co., NY; and an unmarried female, Rosa A. Page (age 18) born in England.

The 1875 New York State Census taken on June 1, 1875, shows Chas. G. Merrill (age 43) born in Broome Co., NY, is a widowed R. R. Agent, and is boarding at the Wm. M. Crosby residence, 4th Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Pauline Lorinda "Polly" (Abbey) Fancher died 1876, probably in Gordon Twp., Todd Co., MN, at about age 40.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 4, 1880, shows Edson Fancher (age 42) born in Pennsylvania, is a widowed Pump Dealer, and is living on Montgomery Street, 4th Ward, Sherman, Grayson Co., TX. Living with him are: Eddie E. Fancher (age 14) born in Minnesota to Pennsylvania and New York-born parents, who has Bilious Fever; Henrietta Williams (age 35) born in Georgia to Georgia-born parents, a divorced Servant; and Walter Williams (age 10) born in Texas to Ohio and Georgia-born parents.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 1, 1880, shows Jonas Mack (age 67) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents, to New Jersey and Vermont-born parents, is a married Wagon Maker, and is living in Montrose Borough, Susquehanna Co., PA. Living with him are: his wife, Elizabeth Mack (age 49) born in Canada to New York and New Jersey-born parents, who is Keeping House; his unmarried daughter, Abbey E. Mack (age 17) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania and Canada-born parents; his son, Archie H. Mack (age 14) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania and Canada-born parents; and a widowed or divorced female Boarder, Jane C. Fraser (age 58) born in New Jersey to New York and New Jersey-born parents, with No Occupation.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 3, 1880, shows shows Chas. G. Merrel (age 48) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents,  Co., NY, is a widowed Agent for the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and is boarding at the William M. Crosby residence, Myrite Avenue, 4th Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June, 1880, shows Phinneas Abbey (age 70) born in New York to New Jersey and Vermont-born parents, is a married Farmer, and is living in Columbus Twp., Warren Co., PA. Living with him are: his wife, Elizabeth Abbey (age 87) born in New York to New York and New Jersey-born parents, and who is Blind, who is Keeping House; his widowed or divorced daughter, Abbie Fancher (age 44) born in Canada to New York and New Jersey-born parents, who is Keeping House; and his granddaughter, Marguri Fancher (age 12) born in New York to Pennsylvania and Canada-born parents.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 7, 1880, shows A. E. Fancher (age 46) born in Canada to Canada-born parents, is a female Head of Household, and who is Keeping House, and is living at 20 Pine Street, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Living with her are: her unmarried son, A. E. Fancher (age 26) born in New York to Pennsylvania and Canada-born parents, a Crockery Merchant; her unmarried stepson, A. D. Fancher (age 23) born in New York to Pennsylvania and New York-born parents, a Crockery Clerk; her daughter, M. A. Fancher (age 13) born in New York to Pennsylvania and Canada-born parents; her married nephew, George F. Hall (age 26) born in Pennsylvania to New York and Canada-born parents, a Bookkeeper; her married niece, Molly Hall (age 22) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents, at Home; Laura Hall (age 1) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents; and four Boarders and Servants.

Leigh Larson note: Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) Fancher and her daughter, Margaret Altenburg Fancher, are listed as living in two different places in the 1880 U. S. Census.

The 1883 Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, City Directory, shows MERRILL CHAS. G., ft. agt., D. L. & W. Depot, h 24 Lewis

Charles Geer Merrill and Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) Fancher were married after 1883, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Charles Geer Merrill died March 5, 1891, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 60.


The Buffalo Express, Buffalo, NY, Tuesday, March 10, 1891

ALONG THE LINES.

Mr. James W. Stack has been made station agent of the Lackawanna at Binghamton in place of Mr. Charles G. Merrill. 


The New York Sun, New York City, NY, Sunday, March 8, 1891

OBITUARY.

Charles G. Merrill, long connected with the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and of late the company's station agent at Binghamton, died suddenly in that city on Thursday, aged 60. 


The 1891 Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, City Directory, shows Merrill Abbie E, widow Charles G, h 24 Lewis

The 1892 Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, City Directory, shows Merrill Abbie E, widow Charles G, h 24 Lewis

The 1892 New York State Census taken February 16, 1892, shows Abbia Merrill (age 59) born in Canada, is living in Enumeration Dist 2, 9th Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Ora Parks died October 15, 1894, in Chautauqua Co., NY, at age 89. Buried in Cherry Creek Cemetery.


The Evening Journal, Jamestown, Chautauqua Co., NY, Thursday, October 25, 1894

HAMLET.

At his home, three miles south of this village, Oct. 15, occurred the death of Ora Parks, at the age of 89 years. He was the oldest resident of the town of Cherry Creek, having come here with his wife to the place, where occurred his death, 66 years ago from Naples, Ontario Co. He was respected by all who knew him. He leaves five children, Mrs. Francis Woodworth of Fort Dodge, Iowa, Beech Parks of Collins, Mrs. Aaron Sheffield of Cherry Creek, Mrs. Mahala Severance and Jabez Parks of this town. The funeral was from his late home Thursday afternoon, Rev. Smith of Cherry Creek officiating; interment in the Cherry Creek cemetery.


Luther Mitchell Skidmore died December 6, 1896, in Toledo, Lucas Co., OH (age 75).


The Norwalk Daily Reflector, Norwalk, Huron Co., OH, Saturday, December 12, 1896

CHICAGO JUNCTION.

The funeral of Mr. Luther Skidmore who died Sunday, December 6th, took place from the M. E. church Monday afternoon. The remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery.


Mary (Buxton) (Vail) Spink died July 31, 1897, in the Village of Silver Creek, Town of Hanover, Chautauqua Co., NY, at age 91. Buried in Glenwood cemetery, Silver Creek, Chautauqua Co., NY.


The Silver Creek Gazette, Silver Creek, Chautauqua Co., NY Thursday, August 5, 1897

Obituary.

In the death of Mrs. Mary Spink which occurred at her home on Dunkirk street, Saturday evening, July 31st, Silver Creek loses its oldest inhabitant. The following sketch, prepared by Rev. J. H. Bates, will be read with interest by many of our older citizens, by whom deceased was so well known and so highly respected.

Mary Spink, maiden name Buxton, was born in Lowell, Mass., Jan. 20, 1807. At an early age she emigrated with her parents to the village of Alexandria, Genesee Co., in this state. When 16 years old she was married on Dec. 30, 1823, to Hollum Vail, with whom a short time afterward she came to Silver Creek. Three children were born to them, one son and two daughters. Only one, Mrs. Skidmore, being left to follow her remains to the grave. Her married life continued about 35 years when it was broken by the death of Hollum Vail, but two years thereafter she was joined in marriage to Norman Spink, with whom she lived a happy life for 12 years. Brother Spink was well known in his relations to the church in this vicinity and his wife took an immediate and deep interest in the work of her Savior. He conversion was about 50 years ago in the Methodist church, during which time she has remained a most earnest and devoted disciple of her Master. Mrs. Spink was possessed of many royal qualities. Those now living who knew her in her younger womanhood mention with pleasure many of the prominent traits of her character. God had endowed her with beauty and abundant health which she carried far into her many years. Even at the age of 50 she was still youthful in appearance and beautiful and she has had no serious sickness until the failure of health which came with last few years through old age. She won the good will of all who knew and maintained it to the end. She was a kind neighbor, ready to assist others in need to the best of her ability. No difficulty was too great for her to surmount in behalf of those who needed her help. She was a devoted wife and patient, self-denying mother and knew how to fill her home with the spirit of Christ. She knew the hardships to which the church, in early days, was exposed. Through its trials she was a brave warrior in the army of the Lord. Her affection for the church never languished, even after her health forbade her attendance upon the Sabbath service she was anxious to hear the report of every sermon and to know what was being done in the way of advance movement. She loved her brothers and sisters in the church and always spoke kindly of them and she rejoiced to hear of any new accession and joined her heart with those that were praying for new converts. Her life has been peculiarly identified with this town from an early date. She was a young woman when men now advanced in years were mere children. She has watched and in her way has participated in the progress that has been made in our civilization. She gave her life in her sphere as truly did and man in his, for the improvement of the conditions of life, to build up the battlements of the home, to establish the church and the school, and to make this a community in which men and women could live in peace and prosperity. Earnest and brave, undaunted by any battle of life, she left her tribute of self denial and service to the welfare of Silver Creek. During the past five years I have known Mrs. Spink intimately, during which time she has been confined to her home and unable to attend the services of the church. Often she has expressed to me the love that she had in her heart for Christ, and the longing with which she looked forward to the city of God. About a week ago I joined with her in prayer and she told me that she was prepared to go, waiting for the call that should liberate her from the bondage of flesh. Peacefully she was sleeping when that call came. She has closed her eyes on the scenes so familiar to her and has opened them upon the mansions that Jesus went to prepare for her.

The funeral services were held at the Methodist Church, Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. H. Bates, assisted by Rev. W. P. Bignall of Sheridan, a former pastor of deceased, paid a touching tribute to her memory. Appropriate music was rendered by members of the church choir. Among those from out of town who attended were David Buxton Hartfield, W. P. Skidmore and wife, Chicago Junction; Mrs. Lucy Lindsley, Canton, Ohio; Franklin Spink, Fredonia; E. Spink and wife, and Simon Aldridge and family, Sheridan. Interment took place at Glenwood cemetery.


The Buffalo Commercial, Buffalo, Erie Co., NY, Thursday, August 5, 1897

SILVER CREEK NEWS.

Death of the Oldest Resident...

Mrs. Mary Spink died Saturday night, and the funeral services were held from the M. E. church at 1:30 p. m. Tuesday. Mrs. Spink was 91 years old, and was the oldest resident of Silver Creek. She was born in Lowell, Mass. She was married Dec. 30, 1823, to Hollum Vail and came to Silver Creek soon after. She was the mother of one son and two daughters, only one of whom survive her, Mrs. L. M. Skidmore. Mr. Vail died about 1860 and a few years later she was married to Norman Spink who died 12 years after their marriage. Mrs. Spink was a woman of exceptional character, and more than ordinary intelligence with much influence in the community. The past few years her declining health has made her confinement at home a necessity, but her many friends continued to call and make her life pleasant to the last. She was a member of the M. E. church for over 50 years and the services were conducted by Rev. J. H. Bates, pastor of the church, after which Rev. W. P. Bignall, a former pastor, paid a glowing tribute to her noble character and worth.


The 1899 Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, City Directory, shows Merrill Abbie E, wid Charles D, h 1 Lincoln av

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 2, 1900, shows Elizabeth Mack (age 71) born September, 1828, in English Canada to New York and New Jersey-born parents, is a widowed Head of Household, and who rents her house, and is living at 37 Fayette Street B Pisce, 7th Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY. Living with her is her unmarried daughter, Abbie E. Mack (age 30) born February, 1870, in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania and Canada-born parents, a Merchant.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June, 1900, shows A. E. Merrill (age 68) born June, 1832, in English Canada to New York-born parents, is a widowed Head of Household, and with none of the three children born to her still alive, is living at 1 Lincoln Avenue, 3rd Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 6, 1900, shows Edson S. Fancher (age 67) born November 1832, in Pennsylvania to Unknown-born parents, is a married Lodger, and is living on Third Street, Assembly Dist. No. 28, City of San Francisco, San Francisco Co., CA. Living with him is his wife of 19 years, Mary N. Fancher (age 53) born February, 1847, in Illinois to Vermont and New York-born parents, and with the only child born to her still alive.

Cordelia "Delia" (Vail) Skidmore died September 15, 1900, at the Masonic Home, Chicago Junction, Lucas Co., OH, at age age 76.


The Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH, Saturday, September 29, 1900WEDDED OLD SWEETHEART.

MASONIC HOME NOTES.

Mrs. Delia Skidmore, a resident of the home, died at Chicago Junction last Monday and was buried there.


Frances L. (Parks) Woodworth died died March 13, 1901, in Iowa, at age 62. Buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA.

Spencer L. Woodworth and Abigail E. (Abbey) (Altenburg) (Vail) (Fancher) Merrill were married February 4, 1902, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.


The Evening Times-Republican, Marshalltown, Marshall Co., IA, Monday, February 24, 1902

MARRIED IN LIFE'S SUNSET.

(Fort Dodge Messenger.)

As the shadows are beginning to fall over his life, Spencer Woodworth, of this city, has gone back to New York state, and has picked up the broken threads of a romance which had been broken off over forth years since. The news has just reached the city of his marriage, far away in the east, to a woman, bent and wrinkled now with age, who was his schoolmate in the happy days of long ago. Mr. Woodworth is 70 years of age, and his bride is 69, but the affection which sprung up when they were children together has outlasted the passage of all the years, and has brought them together in the sunset of their lives. Both of the parties to this strange marriage have been married once, but death has left them free to again enter upon the wedded life. Mr. Woodworth is one of Fort Dodge's well-known citizens. He has made his home here for forty years, and during that time has amasses a competency, having recently come into the possession of a large amount of money by the sale of gypsum land to the Carbon Plaster Company. He is counted a man of considerable means. Mr. Woodworth has been making his home with his daughter, east of Fort Dodge, but has a home in the city where he and his bride will doubtless make their home when they return here. When that time will be is not certainly known.


Spencer L. Woodworth died April 29, 1902, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 70. Buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge, Webster Co., IA.


The Evening Times-Republican, Marshalltown, Marshall Co., IA, Monday, May 5, 1902

WEDDED OLD SWEETHEART.

Life Romance of Spencer Woodworth of Fort Dodge.

Fort Dodge, May 5. - Two months ago in far away New York state, Spencer Woodworth, an old resident of this city, renewed the romance of his youth, and, at the age of three score and ten, married the sweetheart whom he had loved as a boy. Saturday his lifeless body was brought back to this city for interment. Death had abruptly ended his romance. Mr. Woodworth died suddenly from a stroke of paralysis. He has made Fort Dodge his home for years before leaving for New York state, where he had lived since his marriage. He leaves considerable property.


Elizabeth C. Mack died February, 1905, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 76.


The Montrose Democrat, Montrose, PA, Thursday, March 2, 1905,

DEATH'S DOINGS.

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Mack

The death of Mrs. Elizabeth C. Mack, widow of the late Jonas Mack, occurred at her late home in Binghamton, on Sunday afternoon last, at the age of 76 years. Mrs. Mack was formerly a resident of Montrose, where she had many friends who will regret to learn of her death. She was a devoted member of the Episcopal church, and a most estimable Christian lady. She is survived by the following children: Miss Abbie E. Mack and Archelaus H. Mack, of Binghamton, and Theodore F. Mack of Montrose, Pa. The funeral took place Wednesday morning.


Edson Scott Fancher died June 11, 1908, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA, at age 75. Buried in Angelus Rosedale Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 22, 1910, shows Mrs. A. E. Woodworth (age 77) born in English Canada to New York and New Jersey-born parents, is a widowed Head of Household, is living at 1 Lincoln Avenue, 3rd Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

The 1915 New York State Census taken June 1, 1915, shows Mrs. A. E. Woodworth (age 82) born in the United States, is the Head of Household, and who does Housework, and is living at 1 Lincoln Avenue, Enumeration Dist 3, 3rd Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 20, 1920, shows Mrs. Abigail Woodworth (age 87) born in Canada to New Jersey and Pennsylvania-born parents, is a widowed Head of Household, and who owns her house with a mortgage, and is living at 1 Lincoln Avenue, 3rd Ward, City of Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.

Abigail Elizabeth "Abbie" (Altenburg) (Vail) (Fancher) (Merrill) Woodworth died July 24, 1924, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 92. Buried in Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY.


Mrs. Abbie E. Woodworth.

Mrs. Abbie E. Woodworth, 92 years old, died this morning at 7 o'clock. She is survived by a son, Alvin D. Fancher; a niece, Miss Abbie E. Mack; and three nephews, A. A. Mack, of this city, W. S. Fox of Meadeville, Pa., and Charles T. Hall of Pittsburgh, Pa. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:20 o'clock at the Cornell-Dibble Home for Services, 68 Henry street. Burial will be in Spring Forest Cemetery.


Abbie E. Mack died November 25, 1938, in Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, at age 68.


The Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, Friday, November 25, 1938

ABBIE E. MACK

Abbie E. Mack of 74 Conklin avenue died in this city early this morning after a long illness. She is survived by two nieces, Mrs. Alfred C. Mosher of this city and Miss Janette Mack, of Stanford, Conn., and two nephews, Frank and Fred Mack, of Montrose. The body was removed to the Ackley funeral home, 206 Vestal avenue. Funeral announcements will be made later. 


The Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, Broome Co., NY, Saturday, November 26, 1938

MACK - The funeral of Abbie E. Mack will be held at 10:30 o'clock Monday morning at the Trinity Memorial church. The Rev. Wilson E. Tanner will officiate. Burial will be in Spring Forest cemetery. Arrangements by Claude H. Ackley.


As early as 1826, before Mr. Lee ever set forth upon the fateful Sunday walk that brought him to Silver Creek, shipbuilding was in progress. The ship-yard was erected on the east side of Silver Creek not far below the juncture of Walnut Creek, very much on a line with the Rumsey Street of today. Here the well-known “Victory” was started in May 1826 and successfully launched in September. The owner and first ship builder, Mr. Holman Vail, a millwright and native of Otsego County had to have the channel excavated to permit the ship to enter the lake. With this channel deepened, a more ideal location for a ship yard could not be desired. It was as ideal for Mr. Vail’s purpose as the bay with its protecting west cliff was to be for Mr. Lee. Though this first ship was lost by its owner because of the great expense involved and two unsuccessful shipping seasons, it was a very fine vessel indeed. It had a fine record through the years and was the forerunner of others which were to come from that same shipyard. The schooner “Victory” has gone down in history as the first lake vessel to be built in Silver Creek and the first sail craft to be floated from our creek. Holman Vail with his brother John have also their place in history as the pioneer shipbuilders; there were none before them.

Fortunately for the Vails whose all had been lost with the “Victory”, as well as their heart for shipbuilding, Mr. Lee was not interested in lake commerce alone. Before he ever saw Silver Creek’s bay, he was already part owner of the “Liberty”, a successful coasting trade vessel running between Ashtabula, Ohio and Buffalo in 1826 when the Vails were just entering the shipbuilding business. With Mr. Lee’s coming in 1828 came encouragement for the Vails and a new impetus for shipbuilding. Mr. Lee’s shipping experience proved how successful a coasting trade schooner could be, and it renewed the Vails’ zest for building. With his interest, encouragement and financial backing, the Vails again applied their skills to the building of other schooners. Emphasis enough cannot be laid upon the new prosperity and development which came to Silver Creek with the advent of Mr. Lee and his mercantile interests and ambitions for shipbuilding and shipping life. To his far vision, perseverance and gift for organization, the growth of the village is indebted.

As a result of Mr. Lee’s backing of the Vail brothers, between the years of 1828 and 1844 there were fourteen or fifteen different sail and steam boats built and launched at this port. Those must have been thrilling days -- the day of the year when the annual launching took place! How the date must have been rumored through the countryside and how eagerly the settlers must have assembled on the creek bank and shore to watch the schooner’s launching!