Charles Wesley Tipper Blake


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Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake was born June 24, 1834, in Morrison's Cove, Bedford (now Blair) Co., PA, and died November 24, 1905, in Jefferson City, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA, at age 71. Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA. He is the son of Burdine Blake Sr. of Washington Co., MD, and Mazey Ann Simpkins of Hagerstown, Washington Co., MD. 

Margaret Moses was born Unknown and died Unknown.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake and Margaret Moses were married August 2, 1853, in Bedford Co., PA.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake and Margaret (Moses) Blake had no children.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake and Margaret (Moses) Blake filed a newspaper notice for divorce in 1856 in Richland Center, Richland Co., WI, and Charles filed for divorce in the the Court of Common Pleas in Bedford Co., PA, on December 24, 1857, with the divorce being finalized August 2, 1858, in Bedford Co., PA.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake then married Sarah Ann Taylor.

Sarah Ann Taylor was born December, 1831, in Hopewell Twp., Bedford Co., PA, and died June 24, 1904, in Jefferson City, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA, at age 72. Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA. She is the daughter of Thomas Taylor (Born June 23, 1790 - Died January 21, 1856) of Bedford Co., PA, and Elizabeth Keeley  (Born May 17, 1780 - Died August 3, 1864) of Chester Co., PA. Both parents are buried in Saint Pauls Cemetery, Yellow Creek, Bedford Co., PA. Sarah claimed to be related to General Zachary Taylor, the 12th President of the United States.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake and Sarah Ann Taylor were married about September 2, 1858, in Bloody Run, Bedford Co., PA. Please note that this marriage could not commence until the divorce of Charles and Margaret became final.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake and Sarah Ann (Taylor) Blake had seven children:

  1. Belle Salome Blake: Born June 24, 1856, in Bloody Run, Bedford Co., PA; Died January 5, 1909, at her home, City of Jefferson, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA (age 52). Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA.
  2. Married February 26, 1873, in Jefferson City, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA, to Gillum Solon Toliver: Born February 11, 1840, in Bolingreen, Owen Co., IN; Died October 24, 1933, in Jefferson City, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA (age 93). Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA.
  3. Mazie Elizabeth Winona Blake: Born October 22, 1859, in the Village of Bloody Run, Bedford Co., PA; Died February 27, 1944, in Inglewood, Los Angeles Co., CA (age 84).
  4. Married (1) September 24, 1876, in Jefferson City, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA, to George Washington Miller: Born December 23, 1837, in Ohio; Died October 5, 1901, in Lavar, CO (age 63). Married (2) July 7, 1907, in Des Moines, Polk Co., IA, to John Brewer: Born July 1860 in Newell Twp., Vermilion Co., IL; Died October 25, 1910, in Fresno, Fresno Co., CA (age 50). Married (3) August 10, 1913, in the Village of Glenns Ferry, Elmore Co., ID, to William Wallace Wheeler: Born born December 1, 1834, in Royalton, Windsor Co., VT; Died March 5, 1918, in the Village of Glenns Ferry, Elmore Co., ID (age 83).
  5. Harriet Delia Blake: Born February 2, 1862, in the Borough of Bloody Run, Bedford Co., PA; Died May 9, 1908, in Pensacola, Escambia Co., FL (age 46).
  6. Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA. Married (1) March 4, 1880, in Jefferson City, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA, to Hilary Mahanay: Born 1854 in Pennsylvania; Died 1887 in Jefferson City, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA (about age 33). Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA. Married (2) after 1887 in Unknown, to Unknown Fritz: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.
  7. Harlin Burdine Blake: Born November 2, 1865, in the Borough of Bloody Run, Bedford Co., PA; Died June 30, 1940, in Glendale, Los Angeles Co., CA (age 74).
  8. Buried in Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, Los Angeles Co., CA. Married (1) May 21, 1887, in Logan, Harrison Co., IA, to Cora (Unknown) Jones: Born June 1867 in Ohio; Died after 1900 in Unknown. Married (2) March 4, 1903, in Tacoma, Pierce Co., WA, to Anna E. (Allison) Griffith: Born July 11, 1865, in Dayton, Webster Co., IA; Died April 29, 1930, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA (age 64). Divorced about 1920 in California. Married (3) April 4, 1923, in California to Helen B. "Nellie" Russell: Born April 15, 1871, in the Town of Jefferson, Greene Co., IA; Died September 2, 1950, in Los Angeles Co., CA (age 79). Buried in Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, Los Angeles Co., CA.
  9. Loretta Jane Blake: Born February 12, 1868, in the Borough of Bloody Run, Bedford Co., PA; Died March 17, 1942, in Los Angeles Co., CA (age 74). Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA. Married (1) October 3, 1888, in Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, to George E. Sims: Born April 5, 1865, in Mount Pleasant Twp., Racine Co., WI; Died December 28, 1902, in the Village of Cody, Cherry Co., NE (age 37). Divorced. Married (2) April 26, 1898, in Des Moines, Polk Co., IA, to Charles E. Hutchins: Born May 1861 in Nauvoo, Hancock Co., IL; Died January, 1925, in Omaha, Douglas Co., NE (age 63). Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA.
  10. James Henry Blake: Born October, 1870, in the City of Jefferson, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA; Died February 20, 1953, in San Diego, San Diego Co., CA (age 82). Buried in Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, Los Angeles Co., CA.
  11. Married November 11, 1888, in Grand Junction, Greene Co., IA, to Ada Ellen Crow: Born November 5, 1866, in Mechanicville, Cedar Co., IA; Died December 21, 1941, in San Diego, San Diego Co., CA (age 75). Buried in Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, Los Angeles Co., CA.
  12. Charles Wesley Blake: Born November 3, 1873, in the City of Jefferson, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA; Died April 22, 1923, in the City of Jefferson, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA (age 49). Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA. Never married.



TIMELINE


Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake and Sarah Ann (Taylor) Blake are buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


This is a contemporary view of the "Mansion House," the first brick building in Greene county, built by Charles T. Blake in September, 1869. The house was three stories high, with solid walls eighteen inches thick. The front of the house was built against the sidewalk, following the European custom, while the yard and garden were in the back. Please see the newspaper article below for an in-depth discussion of the origin of the house. Somewhere along the way, a two-story building was constructed behind the original building. And, the two were joined together.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Wednesday, February 5, 1908

The property belonging to the estate of the late Charles T. Blake and wife, was sold yesterday at referee's sale by Referee Henry Haag. The store building on the south side of the square, occupied by the Finch shoe shop on the first floor, was sold to Mr. G. S. Toliver for $1,200; the Blake Hotel building was sold to Mr. G. S. Toliver for $1,200; and the residence just west of the of the hotel, occupied by Mrs. A. V. Finch and family, was sold to Dr. C. W. Blake for $1,100. The sale was made in order to facilitate the settlement of the estate and the distribution of inheritances among the heirs.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, February 14, 1933

History of the First Brick House in Jefferson

(By Darwin Hansen)

The City of Jefferson is named for Thomas Jefferson, signer of the Declaration of Independence. The county is named for Nathaniel Greene, a hero of the Revolutionary War. Surely few towns or counties have in the way of names a more suspicious start. As for the land, no more fertile prairies lay out of doors. These beautiful, rolling prairies were now opened up for settlement more conveniently by the arrival of the Chicago and Northwestern railway's building west from Chicago. The first train arrived in Jefferson in August in the year 1888. This started the flow of home seekers and investors into the west.

Wonderful indeed were the tales carried by word of mouth back to the east, of fertile prairies where a furrow a mile or more in length might be plowed. To those of the mountain region of the east, this was most unbelievable.

Among those to whom tidings were carried and who became interested were Charles T. Blake and his wife, Sarah Ann, of Bloody Run, now Everette City, Pennsylvania. That part of the country was suffering especially from the fierce attacks of the Rebel troops. Mother Blake with her big outdoor oven had baked ginger bread for the Union troops. Upon the approach of the rebels had hid her cash and silverware and then baked more ginger-bread for the rebel troops. The soil upon which the Blakes lived was poor, thus it was a continual battle to wrest from it a living. After much consideration to "The promised land." Thanks to the railroad only thirty days were spent on the journey.

So this was Jefferson. No trees, no drainage, plenty of land and a big pond covering all the land north of Washington and east of Chestnut street as was also practically all of what what is now Russell park. Under such conditions Mr. and Mr. Blake started housekeeping on the corner now occupied by Slininger's funeral home. Mr. Blake, a tinner, built his shop on the lot now occupied by Thomas' jewelry store on the Lincoln Highway.

No trees, strange faces made Mother Blake long for her native town and friends. Father Blake offered to build a duplicate of their home in Bloody Run if she would stay in Jefferson. So plans were drawn and the hunt for clay deposits suitable for making brick started. At last a clay pit was found on the present site of the Country club. A kiln was built and the manufacturing of brick began. They ground the clay and put it in molds, which looked like five cigar boxes laid side by side. They were then dried and put in a kiln to bake.

Thus the first brick building in Greene county was built. The house was three stories high, with solid walls eighteen inches thick. The front of the house was built against the sidewalk, following the European custom, while the yard and garden were in the back. After all these years the home is again as planned, for Doctor Jackson has a beautiful yard and garden as of old. Thus the brick house which I am writing about is Doctor Jackson's office and hospital. What is now the entrance to the doctor's office was at that time the second floor. Due to the filling in of the Lincoln highway the first floor was completely submerged and is now used for the basement. The basement still contains the fireplace then used for heating and cooking.

Due to business reverses Mrs. Blake assumed part of the responsibility, and started a milliner shop in which she trimmed hats for the magnificent sum of twenty-five cents each. The first showcase used in her shop is still in existence.

The early pioneer had more to think of than following styles, and with a flock of hungry mouths to feed, new settlers arriving, a hotel seemed much in demand. Thus the Blake home blossomed out in the "Mansion House," with a horse drawn carriage to meet the trains. The fame of Mr. and Mrs. Blake as host and hostess spread and the hotel enjoyed prosperity. Many of the marriages in the early days of Jefferson were held in the parlor of the "Mansion House." Reverend Shipman of Grand Junction officiated at many of them. One groom who had no money to pay the preacher, presented him a box of homemade soap. They must have believed in the old adage, "Cleanliness is next to Godliness."

After Mr. and Mrs. Blake's daughters were married and the Head House was built, the "Mansion House" was closed as a hotel. However, it always remained a meeting place for the friends to gather and visit.

Father and Mother Blake lived to a "ripe old age," and saw fulfilled their faith in Jefferson, that it was to become as beautiful as any city in central Iowa.


The 1820 U. S. Census shows Thomas Taylor is the head of household, and is a Forgeman, and is living in Hopewell Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Those in the household include: 1 Male 0-9; 1 Female 0-9; and 1 Female 16-25.

The 1830 U. S. Census shows Thomas Taylor is the head of household, and is living in Hopewell Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Those in the household include: 1 Male 15-19; 1 Male 30-39; 1 Female 0-4; 1 Female 5-9; and 1 Female 30-39.

The 1830 U. S. Census shows Bordyne Blake (age 30 to 40) is living in Woodbury Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Living with him is his wife (age 30 to 40). Also living there are their children: 1 male under 5, 2 males 5 to 10, and one male 10 to 15, 1 female under 5 and 1 female 5 to 10. Also living there are a male age 60 to 70 and 1 female age 50 to 60.

Sarah Ann Taylor was born December, 1831, in Hopewell Twp., Bedford Co., PA.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake was born June 24, 1834, in Morrison's Cove, Bedford (now Blair) Co., PA.

The 1840 U. S. Census shows Thomas Tailor is the head of household, and is living in Hopewell Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Those in the household include: 1 Male 40-49; 1 Female 0-4; 1 Female 5-9; 2 Females 10-14; and 1 Female 40-49.

The 1840 U. S. Census shows Birdine Blake (age 40 to 50) is living in North Woodbury, Bedford Co., PA. Living with him is his wife (age 40 to 50). Also living there are their children: 2 males 5 to 10, and one male 10 to 15, and 1 male 15 to 20, 2 females 5 to 10, 1 female 10 to 15, and 1 female 15 to 20. James Blake (age 70 to 80) is living next door with his wife (age 50 to 60). Also in the household are: 1 male 10 to 15; 1 female 15 to 20, and 1 female 20 to 25.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 27, 1850, shows Burdine Blake (age 50) born in Pennsylvania is a farmer with real estate valued at $7,000 is living in Martinsburg Borough, Blair Co., PA. Living with him is his wife Mazee Blake (age 50) born in Pennsylvania. Also living there are their children: Wesley Blake (age 16) and Mazee Blake (age 17), both born in Pennsylvania.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on November 25, 1850, shows Thomas Taylor (age 60) born in Pennsylvania, is a Forgeman, and is living in Hopewell Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Living with him is Elizabeth Taylor (age 49) born in Pennsylvania. Also living there are five Taylors, all born in Pennsylvania: Sarah A. Taylor (age 19); Susan H. Taylor (age 15); Phoebe A. Taylor (age 12); Ambrose K. Taylor (age 7); and James H. Taylor (age 3).

The 1855 Wisconsin State Census for Richland Co., WI:

    Ambrose, Jacob: Richwood Twp.; 1 Male, 0 Females

    Ambrose, John W.: Forrest Twp.; 3 Males, 2 Females

    Blake, James D.: Richwood (Forrest) Twp.; 3 Males, 2 Females

    Blake, Simon: Orion Twp.; 1 Male, 1 Female

    Blake, Thomas Charles: Richmond Twp.; 2 Males, 0 Females  (This is probably Thomas Blake and his brother, Charles T. Blake.)


Richland County Observer, Richland Center, Richland Co., WI, March 4, 1856

Circuit Court for the county of Richland, Wis.

Charles T. Blake v. s. Margaret Blake

In Equity, Petition for Divorce

The petition in this cause having been duly filed and subpoena issued, and it appearing by affidavit that said defendant is or was when last heard from in the state of Pennsylvania, it is ordered that said defendant is required to appear in said court, and answer said petition in three months from the date of this order, or said petition will be taken as confessed, and a decree entered accordingly. And it is further ordered, that the said petitioner cause this order to be published for six weeks successively, at least once in each week, in the Richland County Observer, a weekly newspaper published at Richland Center, in said county, and that the first publication thereof be made within twenty days from the date of this order.

Dated this 13th day of February, A. D. 1856

A. B. SLAUGHTER, Court Commissioner.


Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake and Margaret (Moses) Blake filed a newspaper notice for divorce in 1856 in Richland Center, Richland Co., WI, and Charles filed for divorce in the the Court of Common Pleas in Bedford Co., PA, on December 24, 1857, with the divorce being finalized August 2, 1858, in Bedford Co., PA.


Charles Wesley Tipper "Charlie" Blake and Sarah Ann Taylor were married September 2, 1858, in Bloody Run, Bedford Co., PA.


The Bedford Gazette, Bedford Co., PA, September 10, 1858

Mr. Charles T. Blake and Miss Sarah Taylor, both of Pattonsville were married on 2 Sep 1858 in Bloody Run, Everett.


The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 16, 1860, shows Charles T. Blake (age 25) born in Pennsylvania with real estate of $150 and personal estate of $250 is a Tinner and is living in the Village of Bloody Run, West Providence Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Living with him is Sarah A. Blake (age 28) born in Pennsylvania with real estate of $300. Also living there are the following, both born in Pennsylvania: Salome B. Blake (age 4); and Mazey E. Blake (age 8/12).

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on June 22, 1860, shows Elizabeth Taylor (age 59) born in Pennsylvania is a Tailoress with real estate worth $50 and personal estate worth $100 living in Hopewell Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Living with her are three Taylors, all born in Pennsylvania: Susan H. Taylor (age 23); Ambrose K. Taylor (age 18) a Farm Laborer; and James H. Taylor (age 14). Also living there is Phoebe Ann Davis (age 21) born in Pennsylvania.


Waynesburg, Bloody Run, and Everett - all names for the same town.

How the name Bloody Run came about is shrouded in history. Sometime before the official start of the town, the little stream that runs through it got the name Bloody Run. Whether it was named that after an ambush turned the run red with English blood, or some cattle were slaughtered on its banks, perhaps no one will ever know. But those are the two possibilities most often presented.

John Patton built a house - still standing - within present day Everett in 1738, possibly the oldest house in Bedford County. In 1787 a man named Michael Barndollar from Frederick, Maryland, and Philadelphia before that, purchased, from John Musser Of Lancaster, 400 acres of land where the creek named Bloody Run empties into the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River. He laid out a town on that land in 1795. Barndollar named the town Waynesburg in honor of the Revolutionary War General "Mad" Anthony Wayne. The name, however, did not stick, and people soon knew the town only as Bloody Run.

Barndollar built first on the west side of the run, but sold that part of the property in 1800 to Samuel Tate of Shippensburg, PA. Most of that would later be bought back by Barndollar's son, Jacob. On his part of the tract Barndollar erected a stone building and ran a tavern and store. Among other early settlers were Robert Culbertson and Billy Paxton, who operated hotels. Hotels and taverns were very popular on this main route between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. Charles Ashcom settled here about 1806, and was Justice of the Peace as well as running a carpentry shop.

The settlement grew slowly, and in 1860 some citizens petitioned to have the town incorporated as a Borough. The first election, held in 1861 with 58 voters, made Josiah Baughman Chief Burgess and William States Assistant Burgess. Councilmen elected were J. M. Barndollar, William Masters, P. G. Morgart, Samuel D. Schooley, and David Brody. W. P. Barndollar and Jacob Barndollar served as Clerk and Treasurer of the Council.

In 1873, with the citizens wanting a more respectable name for their town, it was officially renamed Everett. This name honored Edward Everett, a former governor of Massachusetts, minister to Great Britain, and most famously a great orator. It was he who gave the main speech at the dedication of the Gettysburg cemetery when President Lincoln gave his "Gettysburg Address."


Over 200 years ago, the sun pierced through the thick forest on a small Indian village and trading post known as Bloody Run, which was located on a wagon road headed to Fort Dusquesne in south central Pennsylvania. In 1787, Michael Barndollar purchased the land in this area, and laid out a town which was originally called Waynesburg. This name was never widely used and this small village was incorporated as a borough in November 1860, to be known as Bloody Run. While this name carries with it many interesting stories and much history, the name was changed in February 1873 to Everett.

About fifteen years since 1873 the ancient name of Bloody Run, which for more than a century had designated the place of that village upon the map, and was known to thousands of travelers throughout this state and the west, was stricken out of existence, and that of Everett was substituted for it. The advent of a railroad had changed the population so that a large majority were newcomers, who had no respect for the historical association, and who disliked to be called by the dubious title of Bloody-Runners, and so they thought that Edward Everett's memory ought to be commemorated rather than the unknown travelers who were killed by the Indians many years ago, and whose blood had ensanguined the water of the rivulet, and given the village the name. And at a borough election they voted for a change, and the court, no one objecting, for it seemed to be conceded, at least passively, that the majority of voters had a right to adopt a new name, decreed the change. Soon after I met that very remarkable old man, General Simon Cameron, who said to me: "Judge, why did you permit that name to be changed?' I replied: 'The people living there, by a large majority, voted in favor of the change and petitioned the court to decree it, and I supposed the majority ought to rule.' 'No, sir,' said he, 'not at all! What have they to do with it? What right have they to make me and tens of thousands of other people all over the country revise our knowledge of geography and learn a new name? Besides, the old name commemorated an incident in the early history of the county. If I had been judge I never would have permitted it.' 'Nor would I, General,' I replied, 'if you had been in court and suggested what you have just stated.' Unquestionably it was a mistake. I have regretted it ever since. There would be as much propriety in changing the name of Bunker Hill.

(Updated Source from original by William M. Hall, 1890.)


The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 11, 1870, shows Charles T. Blake (age 35) born in Pennsylvania with real estate of $5,000 and personal estate of $300 is a Hotel Keeper living in Jefferson, Greene Co., IA. Living with him is his wife, Sarah A. Blake (age 37) born in Pennsylvania. Also living with them are their children, all born in Pennsylvania: Mazy Blake (age 12); Salome Blake (age 11); Harriet Blake (age 9); Berdine Blake (age 7); and Loretta Blake (age 5).

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 8, 1880, shows Charles T. Blake (age 45) born in Pennsylvania of Maryland-born parents is a Hotel Keeper lining in Jefferson, Greene Co., IA. Living with him is his wife Sarah A. Blake (age 47) who is a Landlady born in Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania-born parents. Their unmarried children are also there: Birtie H. Blake (age 14) born in Pennsylvania; Ettie Blake (age 12) born in Pennsylvania; James Blake (age 9) born in Iowa; and Charles Blake (age 7) born in Iowa. Also living there is their married daughter; Hattie Mahaney (age 18) born in Pennsylvania and her husband, Hilary Mahanay (age 26) a blacksmith born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents. Two servants and one boarder also live there.

The 1885 Iowa State Census shows Charles Blake (age 60) born in Pennsylvania is a married Hotel Keeper and is living at Main and Vine Streets, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA. Also living there are: Sarah A. Blake (age 53) born in Pennsylvania, who does Housekeeping; Burdin Blake (age 19) born in Pennsylvania, an unmarried Harness Maker; Etta Blake (age 17) born in Pennsylvania, an unmarried Housekeeping Worker; James Blake (age 14) born in Greene Co., IA; and Charles Blake Jr. (age 11) born in Greene Co., IA.


The Jefferson Souvenir, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Saturday, October 18, 1894

Social and Personal.

Mrs. Geo. Miller, of Alliance, Neb., Mr. Bert Blake of Little Falls, Wash. and Mr. James Blake of Omaha are Sunday visitors in Jefferson coming home for a reunion of the Blake family. Nothing could be more enjoyable than the gathering of former members of the home circle.


The 1895 Iowa State Census shows Chas. T. Blake (age 50) born in Pennsylvania is living in Jefferson, Greene Co., IA. Also living there is Sarah A. Blake (age 62) born in Pennsylvania, and Charles W. Blake (age 21) born in Greene Co., IA.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Thursday, September 19, 1895

PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

MR. THOMAS BLAKE, of Ida county was a guest of his brother C. T. Blake of this city over Sunday. We learn he intends locating in Greene county.


The Jefferson Souvenir, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Saturday March 26, 1898

LITTLE SOUVENIRS.

THE SOUVENIR is pleased to notice the name of Mr. Chas. Blake in the graduating class of 1898, from the medical department of Iowa State University. He will finish next month and be the possessor of a "sheepskin." Dr. Blake has studied hard to gain the desired end, and THE SOUVENIR gladly places him in the ranks of Greene county's self made young men.


The Jefferson Souvenir, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Saturday, September 10, 1898

LITTLE SOUVENIRS.

We are glad to learn that Dr. Chas. W. Blake, a Jefferson graduate, and also a graduate of the regular Medical Department of the State University, where he also did some hospital work, has found a permanent location in Churdan. His office is first door east of the bank. Charlie is a number one Jefferson boy, and has grown up to manhood in our midst, respected by everybody,and we gladly recommend him to our sister town, and wish him unbounded success.


The Jefferson Souvenir, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Saturday, June 10, 1899

Personal and Social.

Mrs. Etta Hutchins and children, of Carson, are here visiting at the parental C. T. Blake home. They expect to remain for a fortnight.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Thursday, December 28, 1899

PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

JAMES BLAKE and wife, with their two children, were guests over Christmas in the parental C. T. Blake household. Jim tells us he has a good job now with C. C. Taft & Company, in Des Moines, and is doing well.


The Jefferson Souvenir, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Saturday, April 28, 1900

SOCIAL AND PERSONAL

Mrs. Hattie Mahany, and son of Kansas City, are in Jefferson, welcome guests of the C. T. Blake household.


The Jefferson Souvenir, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Saturday, May 12, 1900

SOCIAL AND PERSONAL

Mrs. James Blake of Des Moines, formerly remembered as Ida Crow, is visiting Jefferson relatives and friends this week, a guest at the C. T. Blake home. Mr. Blake was here last week but returned home Monday.


The Jefferson Souvenir, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Saturday, October 27, 1900

Social and Personal.

Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Blake went to Yale last week, called there by the death of Mr. Blake's sister-in-law.


The 1900 U. S. Census taken June 6, 1900, shows Chas. T. Blake (age 65) born June 1834 in Pennsylvania of Maryland-born parents is a farmer living in his own home at 115 West Main Street, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA. Living with him is his wife of 40 years, Sarah A. Blake (age 69) born December 1831 in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents. All seven of the children born to her are still alive. Living at home is their unmarried son, Cahs. Blake (age 26) a physician born November 1873 in Iowa to Pennsylvania-born parents.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Thursday, May 16, 1901

PERTINENT POINTS.

Mr. C. T. Blake is making some substantial improvements upon his Main Street hotel property this spring, fitting it up first class shape inside and out.

PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

MRS. ETTA (BLAKE) HUTCHENS and daughters, Lenore and Helen, of Carson, Iowa, are guests for a two weeks' visit in the parental C. T. Blake household.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Thursday, December 26, 1901

JAMES BLAKE and wife, with their two children, were guests the first three days of this week of the parental Charles T. Blake household. James tells us he is now a resident of Kansas City, where he is employed in a wholesale house, and likes that city very much as a place of residence. Many old friends here are glad to see him again.


Sarah Ann (Taylor) Blake died June 24, 1904, in the City of Jefferson, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA, at age 72. Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA.

The 1905 Iowa State Census shows Chas. Blake is living in Jefferson, Greene Co., IA. Also living there is Charles W. Blake.

Charles Wesley Tipper "Charley" Blake died November 24, 1905, in the City of Jefferson, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA, at age 71. Buried in Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Grant Twp., Greene Co., IA.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, September 21, 1905

Our aged friend Mr. Charles T. Blake, who has been in frail health ever since he returned from his visit to his son Berdine Blake, at Tacoma, Washington, is gradually improving under the care of his son Dr. C. W. Blake, and hopes to regain his former strength one of these days. Many well-wishers will join THE BEE in gladness over this news.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Thursday, November 30, 1905

Death of Charles T. Blake

It is with especial sadness that we chronicle the death, which occurred last Saturday evening, of our old friend Charles T. Blake. The cause of death was heart failure, from which he has long suffered. He passed away very peacefully, attended by all the members of the family hereabouts. The funeral services will be held this Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, from the late residence, conducted by Rev. ReQua. We defer the obituary portion until next week, pending the arrival of a brother who is coming on for the funeral, and who will assist the family in making up a suitable record of Mr. Blake's life.


The Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Greene Co., IA, Thursday, December 7, 1905, Page 5

OBITUARY.

CHARLES T. BLAKE

DIED - At his residence in this city, on Friday evening, November 24, 1905, of heart trouble accompanied by dropsical complications, CHARLES T. BLAKE, in the seventy-second year of his age.

Charles T. Blake was born at Martinsburg, Pa., June 24, 1834. His father, Burdine Blake, was a M. E. minister of long-time service, and a man who stood high in the councils of his church during a successful ministry. His mother, was Mary Simpkins, a woman of rare fidelity in all the relations of home, neighborhood and church. He was the youngest of a family of nine children - seven sons and two daughters - and of these but three survive: Burdine Blake of Ronceverte, W. Va., Mrs. Jacob Hamilton, Muscoda, Wis., and Thos. M. Blake of Yale. He lived in his native town through his school years and into young manhood. Before becoming of age he learned the tinner's trade, at which he worked in Onon and Freedom, Pa. Soon after reaching his majority he was united in marriage with Sarah A. Taylor, and they lived from 1855 until the spring of 1858 in the town now known as Everett City, Pa., when they moved to Jefferson, where the remainder of their lives was spent. Seven children were born of this union, all of whom survive the parents: Mrs. G. S. Toliver of this city, Mrs. Mazey E. Miller of Des Moines, Mrs. Hattie D. Mahanay of Birmingham, Ala., H. B. Blake of Tacoma, Washington, Mrs. C. E. Hutchins, Council Bluffs, Jas. T. Blake, Kansas City, Mo. and Dr. Chas W. Blake of this city. With the exception of H. B. all of the children were at the funeral of the father. Before coming to Iowa, Mr. Blake engaged in the mercantile business, which he followed after reaching Jefferson, and later embarked in the hotel business. He seemed to be fond of farming on a small scale, not so much for the profit resulting from his strenuous labor as from the fact that it furnished something for his willing and apparently tireless hands to do. He will be remembered by those who know him best as one of the world's most faithful, earnest workers. His every day life seemed to be one of happy content until the good woman who had been a loyal sharer with him in the cares and conflicts, passed forever from his earthy vision. When heard and answered the call of the death angel, June 24, 1904, they were about to enter the half century year of their married life. For weeks the vision of the shadow of death had laid before his eyes, yet fearlessly, triumphantly indeed, his feet entered the phantom dark river that ceaselessly flows between the shores of time and the eternity that lies beyond. He's going out of life as he came under Divine guidance to the end of the way, was wondrously ideal. He had reached the point where all of the covetings on the earthly side had merged into the one grand thought and entered in Eternal Life and in the xxx, who had paid the ransom that made him a son of the kingdom where the blessed are. It was not his thought to worry or brave an anxious care, but in the enjoyment of a peace that passeth understanding, he simply listened for the same summons, "Come home!" 

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The funeral services (at the request of deceased) were held at the family home on Wednesday at 1:30 p. m., and despite the inclemency of the day, a large circle of sympathizing friends gathered to pay a moment of loving respect to the life of their long-time neighbor and friend. The exercises were conducted by Rev. ReQua who read the third chapter of the first epistle of John, taking his text from the 11th verse: "This is the message that ye have heard from the beginning, that ye should love one another." The harmful was heard from the beginning, the burial was made in the family lot by the side of the devoted wife who had preceded him by so short a span of time to the eternal home "on the other side of the hills." As was said of two close friends of the early day, so of time: "They were united in their lives and in death were not divided." "Uncle Blake," as he was familiarly called, was a man of many friendships, because he coveted friends and the angel's song of "peace on earth and good will to men," was a sentimental melody in his big heart. He was plain and simple in all his tastes and the pomp and pageantry of life had no attraction for him; was a gratefully content with the daily mercies coming into his life. A man of firm convictions concerning right and duty, standing like a rock  for his principles, no matter whether the world smiled or frowned. The Word of God and conscience were his guide and he lived close to these notions for good, hence his life was a marvel of strict integrity both in speech and conduct. His record as a neighbor and citizen is beyond reproach and his untiring faith ever looked for its source to the summit of Calvary. The seven children who favor his memory will give him a very precious place in their hearts as the years go by, and in final gracious eternal in him the plaudit of having been a kind, loving, faithful father. And better preface than that our departed friend would not have asked them to give. Peace to the memory of Charles T. Blake.


The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 26, 1910, shows Charles W. Blake (age 32) born in Iowa to Pennsylvania-born parents is an unmarried physician in an Office who rents his home at 211 Penn Street, 3rd Ward, City of Jefferson, Jefferson Twp., Greene Co., IA.


The  Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Iowa; Tuesday, October 23, 1951

Diary of a Housewife, by Mary Kay Kidder

I happened across that 1869 story of the bell quite by accident. I was reading the 1869 issues in the hope of finding some story about the building up on Lincolnway next to Sliningers. When the old stucco was removed from that building recently, and the new concrete exterior blown on, I got to wondering about the history of the place. The placque on the front of the building calls it "The Mansion House" and points out that it was the first brick building to be erected in Greene county. The date of September, 1869, appears on the placque, along with the name of the original owner, Charles T. Blake. Although I found mention of other brick buildings being built in Jefferson in the last months of 1869, not a word could I find about The Mansion House or "Blake House" as some folks say it was called.


The  Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Iowa, March 17, 1953

Jefferson friends just recently learned of the death of James Blake on the 20th of February in San Diego, Calif. He was born in Bedford, Pa. and came to Jefferson with his parents when a small child. His burial took place at Rose Hill Memorial Park, Whittier, Calif., Feb. 24th. He is survived by a son and daughter and his wife.

Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, Los Angeles Co., CA, said there is a James H. Blake died February 20, 1953, and interred February 25, 1953 (age 77).


The  Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Iowa; June 5, 1956

Diary of a Housewife, by Mary Kay Kidder

Story of Jefferson Hotels Recounted

Brick Mansion House

What has always been considered the first brick building in Jefferson is the Mansion house. This place did a good business, and in 1871 was kept by Charles T. Blake, as it was later in 1876. It was a brick two-story structure measuring 30 by 40 feet, with a kitchen and dining room in the basement. It had 18 rooms, and Mr. Blake had been a resident here for three years.

It is still a downtown landmark, located on the south side of Lincolnway in the 100 block between Wilson avenue and Vine, and identified by a placque. It is next door to Sliningers and is operated by the Peters family as a rooming and apartment house.

Next Called "Commercial"

In April of 1882 the Mansion house was under new management of J. W. Grogan & Co. and then was called the Commercial House. They advertised a free bus to and from all trains.


The  Jefferson Bee, Jefferson, Iowa; Tuesday, November 15, 1960

Diary of a Housewife, by Mary Kay Kidder

If you walk east along the south side of Lincolnway, past the Slininger Funeral Home, the next building you pass will be a concrete-covered on which stands unobtrusively between Slininger's and the Maid-Rite Cafe.

If you take a second look at this building, you will note a bronze placque on it which tells that it is the "Mansion House, erected in 1869 by Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Blake, the first brick building erected in Greene County."

If you go inside the building down into the basement, you'll see on one wall the outlines of a huge fireplace - now covered over with blown concrete. And, if you talk to someone who knows the history of the building, you'll learn that several big windows been plastered over with concrete to form the solid basement walls of today - windows that used to look out on the street (now Lincolnway) back in the days when the building was a thriving hotel and the basement was the ground floor, where the dining room was located.

Some folks say there used to be a sort of deck up on the roof of the building where dances were held. The bronze tablet on the building was the gift of the late W. F. Mahaney, grandson of the pioneer couple who built the building. The tablet was dedicated in ceremonies sponsored by the local DAR Chapter in 1937. At that time a brief history of the building was related by the late E. B. Wilson.

"Charles T. Blake and his wife," Mr. Wilson said, "had come west into a new prairie country, and located at the town then known as New Jefferson. It was a prairie town. There were no trees. Mrs. Blake mourned for her home among the tree-covered hills of Pennsylvania.

"Therefore, her husband, like all husbands ought to try to do, sought to console his wife to some extent by building for her home, in 1869, a brick house which was an exact duplicate of their home at Bloody Run, Pa., built right up to the street with the garden in the rear, as was the English way carried into the colonies many years before.

"Thus was built in 1869 the first brick building in Greene County. The bricks were hand made in a brickyard not far from the present Jefferson Country Club grounds. The timbers were all hand-hewn and the house was a three-story structure, the basement windows looking out on the street and steps leading up to the front door, with a fireplace in the basement. This frontal appearance was changed by raising the sidewalk level when the Slininger building was erected.

"Mr. Blake was an expert tinner by trade and carried on a hardware store about where the Aldera store now is located. (Crowley's now). When he quit the store business he and his good wife opened this brick building as a hotel, known as the Mansion House, and for many years it was the leading hotel in the town.

"Here in those early days many travelers were well fed and made comfortable. One of the familiar sights in those days was Mr. Blake in his old one-horse top buggy, meeting the trains."

There are some folks who still remember the old building when it was a hotel. Clyde Shannon says he first came to Jefferson in 1883, when he was nine years old. "It was a going hotel," Shannon says. He also remembers Mr. Blake and his horse, whose name, Shannon says, was "Joe." And he recalls seeing Mr. Blake and Joe working in their market garden where the north half of Russell Park now is - and later on in a big garden along Grimmell Road, north of where the hospital now stands.

Both Charles T. Blake and his wife, Sarah, died in 1904 - Mrs. Blake in July and Mr. Blake in November. After that the property changed several times. It was purchased by Mahanay in 1920.

No one seems to remember for certain just when the building ceased to be a hotel. And there seems to be some confusion about the name of that hotel too. When the bronze tablet was dedicated, it seemed to agree that "Mansion House" was the name. However, many folks remember it as "Blake House." And in an item in The Bee in April of 1923, in the obituary of Charles W. Blake, youngest child of the pioneer couple, we read: "He was born in the Blake House, now known as the Lincoln House, which was the first brick building in this city."

But, there is no disagreement over the fact that this was a "going" hotel in the late 1880's. We have a letter written by the daughter of Mrs. Will Higgins, telling of the time Will Higgins' father and family stopped at the hotel in 1882. The letter reads: "William Higgins and his family came by train to Jefferson with some livestock, and on arriving they could find no place to spend the night. They went to the Blake Hotel where the entire family was accommodated. There were Mr. and Mrs. William Higgins and their two grown sons, Will and Mike, and their grandson, Wiull Winey; also a married son Jack Higgins and family. They had a good night's rest.

"The Blake Hotel would accommodate students until they could find a home. The Blakes helped these students financially, too.

"The cattle were pastured and fed at the hotel."

In 1923, Greene County's first brick building passed into another phase. It was used as a hospital. Dr. J. M. Jackson had a hospital there, and the late Dr. L. C. Hanson came in with him in 1932. The building was used as a hospital until 1936, when the doctors moved into the newly-constructed clinic building.

In January of 1930, a letter from the late E. M. Troxell appeared in The Herald. Mr. Troxell had just observed his 90th birthday. He wrote, "I came to Jefferson 62 years ago. The next year the first brick house was built and I helped build it...This house stands there now. It was the Charley Blake house, and now it is used for a hospital."

The most recent phase of the old building's history began in 1944 when James O. Peters purchased it from Mahanay. At that time, it was operated an an apartment house, and still is.

Somewhere along the way, a two-story building was constructed behind the original building. And, the two were joined together. The Peters' living room and kitchen are now in the section between the two buildings.

There are now three apartments and four single rooms in the building. But, as you study the original building, you can see a 12-room hotel there with an inviting dining room downstairs - a fire blazing in the big fireplace - and big windows through which you might watch horse-drawn vehicles go by.

Out in back, there is today a beautiful, well-kept back yard. And as you look out there, you can visualize the "garden in the rear" which Charles T. Blake planned for his Sarah more than 90 years ago.