Charles Gilby Abbey
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Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey was born September 20, 1887, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND, and died June 15, 1964, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND, at age 76. Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. He is the son of Abner Nathaniel Abbey of Clarke Twp., Newcastle Dist., Durham Co., Canada West, and Emma Gilby of York, England.

Pearl Georgina Peoples was born September 20, 1889, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND, and died December 3, 1959, in San Diego, San Diego Co., CA, at age 70. Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. She is the daughter of Samuel J. Peoples of English Canada, and Sarah A. Derry of English Canada.

Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey and Pearl Georgina Peoples were married December 25, 1917, in the Peoples' country home in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey and Pearl Georgina (Peoples) Abbey had five children:

  1. Merle Ruth Abbey: Born October 2, 1918, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died February 7, 1998, in Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND (age 79). Buried in St. Paul's Lutheran Church Cemetery, Gilby Twp., Honeyford, Grand Forks Co., ND. Married March 21, 1942, in Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND, to Adolph Richard Kvamme: Born February 21, 1918, in North Dakota; Died July 2, 1981, in Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND (age 63). Buried in St. Paul's Lutheran Church Cemetery, Gilby Twp., Honeyford, Grand Forks Co., ND.
  2. Kenneth Gilby Abbey: Born November 18, 1919, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died February 1, 2011, in Beaumont, Riverside Co., CA (age 91). Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles Co., CA. Married (1) before 1946 in Unknown to Mary Martha Koenig: Born January 14, 1915, in Leroy Twp., Audubon Co., IA; Died July 25, 1977, in Los Angeles Co., CA (age 62). Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles Co., CA. Married (2) August 27, 1978, in Los Angeles Co., CA, to Beverly D. Smith: Born December 27, 1927, in Unknown. Divorced August 30, 1984, in Los Angeles Co., CA. Married (3) 1996 in Unknown to Grace Dorothy (Crawford) (Underwood) Tucholke: Born August 20, 1918, in Helmet, Riverside Co., CA; Died March 3, 2006, in Oregon (age 87). Buried in Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah Co., OR.
  3. Donna Louise Abbey: Born June 28, 1921, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died March 3, 2000, at Sharp Memorial Hospital, Community of Kearny Mesa, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA (age 78). Buried in Glen Abbey Memorial Park, Bonita, San Diego Co., CA. Married November 28, 1947, at Brooklyn Heights Presbyterian Church, Chula Vista, San Diego Co., CA, to Richard Burton James: Born May 5, 1921, in Garnet Mesa Pct., Delta Co., CO; Died December 8, 1996, at Kaiser Hospital, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA (age 75). Buried in Glen Abbey Memorial Park, Bonita, San Diego Co., CA.
  4. Samuel Abner Abbey: Born April 13, 1924, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died August 1, 2001, in Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND (age 77). Buried in Memorial Park South, Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND. Served in the U. S. Navy in WWII. Never married.
  5. Charles Orrin Abbey: Born October 20, 1928, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died December 10, 2009, in Veteran's Administration Hospital, Fargo, ND (age 81). Buried in Memorial Park South, Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND. Married (1) 1950 to Marilyn A. Nygard: Born December 19, 1932, in Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND. Divorced October 3, 1985, in Polk Co., MN.  Married (2) May 22, 1976, in Polk Co., MN, to Lavila RoJean (Cummins) Johnson: Born August 6, 1934, in Norway Township, Kittson, MN. Divorced 1986 in Unknown. Married (3) July 18, 1986, in Polk Co., MN, to Marilyn Joyce (Hansen) Berg: Born July, 1932, in Unknown. Marilyn A. (Nygard) Abbey then married September 3, 1976, in Roberts Co., SD, to Richard Alvin Riel: Born September 8, 1933, in Unknown.



TIMELINE


   

Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey and Pearl Georgina (Peoples) Abbey are buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making these images available.


Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey was born September 20, 1887, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.


Marriage Certificate of Samuel J. Peoples and Sarah Derry


Pearl Georgina Peoples was born September 20, 1889, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 27, 1900, shows Abner Abbey (age 50) born August 1849 in Canada is a farmer living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. His wife Emma Abbey (age 52) born June 1848 in England is living there, as well as their daughter Aliecmon Abbey (age 14) born September 1885 and son Charles Abbey (age 12) born September 1887. Both of their children born in North Dakota. Abner is shown as coming to the USA from Canada in 1870. Emma was shown as coming to the USA from England in 1882.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 4, 1900, shows Samuel Peokles (age 25) born June 1867 in English Canada to Ireland and Canadian-born parents and emigrating in 1889 is a Farmer owning his own farm in Fertile Twp., Walsh Co., ND. Living with him is his wife of 14 years, Sarah Peokles (age 33) born July 1866 in English Canada to Massachusetts and English Canadian-born parents, and emigrating in 1889, with all 6 of her children alive, unmarried and living at home: Farnk Peokles (age 13) born October 1886 in English Canada and emigrating in 1889; Robert W. Peokles (age 12) born February 1888 in English Canada and emigrating in 1889; Georgina P. Peokles (age 10) born September 1889 in North Dakota; Gertrude M. Peokles (age 7) born May 1893 in North Dakota; Milton E. Peokles (age 5) born January 1895 in North Dakota; and Florance M. Peokles (age 2) born October 1897 in North Dakota. 

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 28, 1910, shows Charley G. Abby (age 22) is an unmarried head of household farm laborer working out born in North Dakota of Canadian and English parents, living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him were five other people unrelated to him.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on May 7, 1910, shows Samuel Peoples (age 46) born in English Canada to Irish-born parents and emigrating in 1891 and a Naturalized citizen is a General Farmer owning his own farm in Fertile Twp., Walsh Co., ND. Living with him is his wife of 24 years, Sarah Peoples (age 45) born in English Canada to Vermont and English Canadian-born parents, and emigrating in 1891, with all 8 of the children born to her still living, and all born in North Dakota to English Canadian-born parents. The six children living at home are all unmarried and born in North Dakota to English Canadian-born parents: Georgina P. Peoples (age 19); Gertrude M. Peoples (age 16); Milton Peoples (age 15); Florence M. Peoples (age 13); Ethel J. Peoples (age 9); and Harry C. Peoples (age 4). Also living there is an unrelated servant.

The 1915 North Dakota State Census taken on April 1, 1915, shows Charles G. Abbey (age 27) is living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him are: Albert G. Olson (age 27); Cecil E. Lee (age 20); Roy A. Harris (age 20); Warren Harris (age 22); and Heneritta Gratmo (age 40).


A BARN DANCE TRAGEDY

In the early 1900's baseball was a favorite sport of the times. Charles G. Abbey of Gilby was going into the dairy business and a new modern barn was being constructed on his farm. Plans called for two huge silos to be built into the structure. The baseball team and their sponsors decided to have a benefit play and dance for the home town team before the silos were constructed. A temporary floor was built in the barn at the second level and carpenters declared it to be safe.

A home talent play, "Among the Breakers," a story of the sea, had been rehearsed. The cast of characters were the following:

David Murray            Keeper of Highpoint Light          D. H. Haddow

Larry Devine             His Assistant                             R. E. Walker

Hon. Bruce Hunter    Prominent Lawyer                      J. D. Bogert

Clarence Hunter        His Ward                                   Geo. F. Stewart

Peter Paragraph       Newspaper Reporter                  Nels Jorgenson

Tad                          Hunter's Colored Servant           W. J. Shibley

Bonnie Dare             Hunter's Niece                           Pearl McKechnie

Tess Starbright         Tossed up on the Waves           Grace Johnson

"Mother Carey”         A Reputed Fortune Teller           Mrs. F. L. McLean

Biddy Bean              Irish Lassie                                Hannah Scott

A date was set and posters were displayed far and near. In detail they read, "A Comedy­-Drama in Two Acts will be given under the auspices of the Gilby Baseball Team, Friday Evening, June 2, 1916 in the new mammoth barn on the Chas. G. Abbey farm, 2 miles south and 2 miles east of Gilby, or 2 miles north and 3 miles west of Mekinock. This huge barn gives us a fine airy auditorium of 36 x 120 feet, with a seating capacity of one thousand people, electric lighted, good ventilation, com­fortable seats, competent ushers. No pain will be spared to make everything pleasing to the spectators."

"The drama ‘Among the Breakers’ which is to be presented by a competent cast is an absorbing play, full of pathos and has inspired intelligent minds where ever presented. This play will be an exceptional ONE. ONLY LAUGHS, absolutely absorbing, orchestrated continually and uproariously funny. A social and laughable production of occult power. Three solid hours of extreme pleasure."

"Immediately after the show a social dance will be given, one of those real old time, rip-­roaring hoedowns, with good music, a good floor, and all your friends present to assist you in having the real time of your life."

"Tickets for show 50 cents and 35 cents. Tickets for dance $1.00 Souvenir Programs at the Dance."

At last the play was ready and a popular group called the Finley Band was hired for the dance. Chefs from Grand Forks were engaged and "tons of food" including hamburger, buns, ice cream and coffee were ordered. Electricity was powered by two thirty volt Delco plants brought in for the occasion. The evening of June 2, 1916 crowds gathered, tying horses to fence lines and parking the cars along the driveway and on the roads leading into the farmstead. Seating capacity in the huge barn had been advertised at one thousand, but the crowd exceeded beyond all expectations. They were packed shoulder to shoulder on the sec­ond floor of the barn and spilled over into the yard. Following the play the orchestra tuned up. Directly below a crew of men were servic­ing and filling gasoline lamps for added lighting. Ole Benson was hanging these from the ceiling. As the first dance number began, the crowd surged onto the floor and the observers pressed back around the edges. Suddenly the floor gave way, breaking one stairway and many dancers fell, pinning Mr. Benson beneath the crowd. He was brought to the house and later transported to Grand Forks. His back had been broken and he died shortly. Several others had bruised shoulders and other injuries, but non serious. Flames could be seen and the crowd panicked. People scrambled out windows, doors and down the scaffolding around the barn. Finley's Band immediately struck up a lively tune which calmed the crowd to some extent as they milled around the structure. Quickly sacks of cement were ripped open and this was used to extinguish the flames. Hamburger and other food supplies were sold in bulk to families and the money was given to the baseball team. It was a sad, early ending to a long anticipated event.

An original poster, printed on linen and attached to a heavy board hung for many years in the blacksmith shop in Gilby owned by W. J. Shibley. Smoky and faded the lettering was barely distinguishable. It was retouched and a copy is enclosed. The original poster is in the hands of The Shibley family.


The Grand Forks Herald, Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND, Wednesday, June 21, 1916

BENSON WILL BE BURIED AT GILBY

Blacksmith Injured When Dancing Floor Collapsed Passes Away

The body of Ole Benson, the Gilby blacksmith who passed away at St. Michaels's hospital Tuesday morning, was taken to Gilby last evening, where interment will be made. Mr. Benson sustained a broken back, a burned arm and several minor injuries in the barn accident at Gilby a few weeks ago. He was brought to the city, where every effort has been made to save his life. However, complications set in from the burn on his arm and amputation was found necessary. Although certain that he would die, Benson has been exceptionally cheerful and awaited death patiently. He is survived by his wife, an infant child less than one year old, and his mother, who resides near Fisher.


The Ward County Independent, Minot, Ward Co., ND, Thursday, June 22, 1916

BRIEF STATE NEWS

Ole Benson, blacksmith of Gilby, N. D., suffered a broken neck on Friday, June 2, when the loft of a barn in which a dance was being given by the Gilby baseball team caved in, dropping more than 150 persons more than fifty feet. Several others were seriously injured, but will recover. Benson's condition is regarded as hopeless. The barn caught fire and a panic was narrowly averted.


The WWI Draft Registration Report dated June 5, 1917, shows Charles Gilby Abbey is an unmarried Farmer, and is living in Gilby, ND.


   

Charles Gilby Abbey's WWI Draft Registration Report.


Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey and Pearl Georgina Peoples were married December 25, 1917, in the Peoples' country home in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.


The Grand Forks Herald, Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND, December 29, 1917

A Christmas day wedding of interest was that of Miss Pearl Peoples of Park River and Charles Abbey of Gilby, N. D., which took place at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Peoples. Miss Gertrude Peoples of Powers Lake, a sister of the bride, and Albert Olson of Gilby, N. D., acted as bridesmaid and best man. Mr. and Mrs. George A. Lee and Miss Thelma Humphrey of Grand Forks, and Robert Peoples of Ruddell, Sask., a brother of the bride, were among the out of town guests who attended the wedding. Mr. and Mrs. Abbey have left for California to spend the winter and will be at home on the Abbey farm near Gilby after March 1.


The WWI Draft Registration Report dated September 7, 1918, shows Alton Percy Van Vorst (age 20) born March 13, 1898, with permanent home of Paynesville, Stearns Co., MN, is employed in Farming for Chas. G. Abbey in Gilby, ND. His nearest relative is Wallace Van Vorst of St. Cloud, Stearns Co., MN. Leigh Larson note: Alton Percy Van Vorst is the first cousin once removed of Charles Gilby Abbey.


Merle Ruth Abbey was born October 2, 1918, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

Kenneth Gilby "Ken" Abbey was born November 18, 1919, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 22, 1920, shows Charles Abbey (age 32), born in North Dakota to English Canadian and England-born parents, is a married Dairy Farm Farmer, and is living on a farm in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him are: his wife, Pearl Abbey (age 29) born in North Dakota to English Canadian-born parents, who does General House Work; his daughter, Merle Abbey (age 1-3/12), born in North Dakota to North Dakota-born parents; and his son, Harold Abbey (age 3/12), born in North Dakota to North Dakota-born parents. A Cook and three Boarders are also living in the household. Leigh Larson note: The census enumerator used the name Harold Abbey for Kenneth Gilby "Ken" Abbey.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 17, 1920, shows Avner Abby (age 70) born in Canada to Pennsylvania and English-born parents is a Rental Farmer owning his home living in Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him is his wife, Emma Abby (age 71) born in England to English-born parents. Both are naturalized citizens. 


The Grand Forks Herald, Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND, Saturday, March 13, 1920

GILBY --- Where Diversified Farming Spells Wealth

The Abbey Dairy.

Charles Abbey, the proprietor of the Abbey Dairy Farm, is himself a North Dakota product. His father, Abner Abbey, is one of the most interesting of the remaining pioneers. He came to the territory of Dakota in 1873 from near Port Hope, Ontario. For two years he drove a mule team in the government service, having one of the train of 406 mule teams plying between Fort Ambercrombie, fifteen miles south of Fargo, to Fort Lincoln, near Bismarck. The main line of the Northern Pacific railway was being surveyed. Custer was in command of the cavalry that protected the great supply train of prairie schooners and herds of cattle. Mr. Abbey has a wealth of interesting stories to tell about those wild days. His recollections of General Custer, and of the many skirmishes with the Indians, and the attacks of the buffalo on the cattle, would make a thrilling chapter. The next year Mr. Abbey was in the party that surveyed the Canadian boundary. In 1880 he came to what is now Gilby, and took a homestead near Voss, which he held for several years. Then he filed on a pre-emption four miles southeast of the present townsite of Gilby, and he has lived there ever since, on the farm which his son Charles Abbey now operates. This land was bought from the Gilby brothers, George and James. The Gilby brothers came from Wisconsin in 1879. The first post office was on John Gilby's land, joining the present Abbey farm, and with it the township was named for John Gilby, the first postmaster. In '82, Emma Gilby came out to Dakota to keep house for her brothers. Here she met Abner Abbey, and a romance began, the light of which still shines from their faces as they recount the history of the early days. Mr. nd Mrs. Abbey have left the arduous work of the farm to the younger generation, and are now comfortably situated in town.

Pasteurized Milk.

During the past five years, Charles Abbey has gone extensively into the dairying business. He has a herd of about one hundred cattle, good grades and purebred Holsteins. This herd includes some of the finest milch cows in the northwest. With the most up-to-date ideas in the marketing as well as in the handling of his products, Mr. Abbey has established a large milk business in Grand Forks. The quality of the milk sold by the Abbey Milk company is very high. It is the only pasteurized milk sold in the city, and the volume of business, which is enormous, attests the appreciation of this wholesome product. The pasteurization of the milk is a heating and cooling process which takes nothing from the milk except any possible germs which it may contain, and adds nothing to it, save an absolute guarantee of purity. Cream, whipping cream, skimmed milk and buttermilk are also obtainable from this excellent dairy. The demand for the Abbey products exceeds the supply, and Mr. Abbey plans to make a large ideal plant in the city for the handling of the increasing production.

An Ideal Dairy Farm.

The dairy farm is itself an ideal one. About 1,700 acres of land are operated by Mr. Abbey. This land includes spacious pastures, well shaded with trees and with a good supply of pure water for the cattle. In winter the stock are watered from a deep well. There is a complete set of farm buildings. There are two houses. A new modern barn, a picture of which appears with this article, greatly facilitates the expert work of caring for the herd. Everything about the place is done by electricity. The best model of milking machine is used, operated by electricity. A complete set of power driven machine of the milk throughout the entire process of producing it and its products for market. Meantime, while Mr. Abbey is making a fine thing of his dairy business, the land is increasing daily in value. The crops used for feed for the cattle are returning large quantities of nitrates to the soil. Sweet clover, alfalfa, corn and hay are raised extensively. Sedan grass is largely cultivated by Mr. Abbey. His grain yields are being greatly increased by his rotation of wheat, oats and barley with his leguminous crops. Mr. Abbey has his own threshing machine. F. J. Kinsala is employed in the dairying with Mr. Abbey.


Donna Louise Abbey was born June 28, 1921, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

Samuel Abner "Sam" Abbey was born April 13, 1924, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

The 1925 North Dakota State Census taken on April 1, 1925, shows Charles Abbey (age 37) is living in Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him are: Pearl Abbey (age 34); Merl Abbey (age 6); Donna Abbey (age 3); Samuel Abbey (age 1); Milton Peoples (age 29); John Wansink (age 27); and Gilbert McAlters (age 51). Leigh Larson note: The census enumerator made no mention of the name Harold Abbey or Kenneth Gilby "Ken" Abbey.

Charles Orrin Abbey was born October 20, 1928, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 10, 1930, shows Charles Abbey (age 42), born in North Dakota to English Canadian and England-born parents, and first married at age 30, is a married Partner in a Dairy Farm, who is renting his farm, and is living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him are: his wife Georgina Abbey (age 39) born in North Dakota to English Canadian-born parents, and first married at age 27; his daughter, Merle Abbey (age 11), born in North Dakota to North Dakota-born parents; his son, Kenneth Abbey (age 10), born in North Dakota to North Dakota-born parents; his daughter, Donna Abbey (age 8), born in North Dakota to North Dakota-born parents; his son, Sammy Abbey (age 5), born in North Dakota to North Dakota-born parents; and his son, Charles Abbey (age 1-6/12), born in North Dakota to North Dakota-born parents.

The 1940 U. S. Census taken on April 16, 1940, shows Charles Abbey (age 52) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 2 years of High School, is a Farmer of his Own Farm who is renting his home for $5/month, and is living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him are: his wife Pearl Abbey (age 49) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 2 years of High School; his unmarried son, Kenneth Abbey (age 20) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 4 years of High School, Farm Laborer by Month; his unmarried daughter, Donna Abbey (age 18) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 4 years of High School; his unmarried son, Samuel Abbey (age 15) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 1 year of High School; and his unmarried son, Charles Abbey Jr. (age 12) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 5 years of School.

The WWII Draft Registration Report dated April 27, 1942, shows Charles Gilby Abbey is married unemployed, and is living in Gilby, ND.


   

Charles Gilby Abbey's WWI Draft Registration Report.


Pearl Georgina (Peoples) Abbey died December 3, 1959, in San Diego, San Diego Co., CA, at age 70. Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.


The San Diego Union, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA, Friday, December 4, 1959

Deaths - Funerals

ABBEY - Pearl Georgina. Wife of Charles G. Abbey. Mother of Mrs. Donna A. James and Kenneth Abbey. Services Sat. 3:30 p.m. Lewis Colonial Mortuary.


Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey died June 15, 1964, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND, at age 76. Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.


Grand Forks County Heritage Book, A History of Rural Grand Forks County, Grand Forks County Heritage Book Committee, 1976

CHARLES ABBEY

Sp. PEARL PEOPLES

In 1915 Charley decided to go into the dairy business. A new modern barn was constructed. (See special feature story.) Charley had a herd of about one hundred cattle, good grades and some purebred Holsteins which he had shipped in from Iowa. The herd included some of the finest milch cows in the northwest. With the most up-to-date ideas in the marketing as well as in the handling of his products, Charley established a large milk business in Grand Forks. The quality of milk sold by the Abbey Milk Company was very high. It was the only pasteurized milk sold in Grand Forks and the volume of business, which was enormous, attested to the appreciation of the wholesome product. Whole milk, cream, whipping cream, skimmed milk and buttermilk were available. The demand for the Abbey products exceeded the supply and an ideal plant in the city was planned for the handling of the increasing production.

In 1915 the dairy farm had about 1,700 acres of land including spacious pastures, well shaded trees and a good supply of water. In winter the stock was watered from a deep well, with water piped to each individual stanchion. Besides the farm home a second house was built for cooking and housing the hired men and cook. Everything on the farm was done by electricity. A complete set of power driven machinery took care of the milk through the entire process of preparing it and its products for market.

For a few short years the dairy business seemed to be profitable, but the entire enterprise of building, construction, maintenance, purebred cattle, labor and transportation of milk products all were very expensive and put Charley heavily in debt. Though the dairying business was increasing, it became too large a venture, too far from the distribution point. Financially the overhead costs in Grand Forks became overwhelming. With much deliberation, the decision to sell the cattle was made. At first the dairy barn was used for a chicken project, raising capons and laying hens. Gradually Charley went into raising Great Northern beans along with the other crops. These beans, hand sorted and picked over, financed the college education of his sons and daughters.

In 1917, at a 4th of July celebration in Minto, Gilby's baseball team was scheduled to play. That same year Gertrude Peoples of Park River had taught in the Gilby School. She knew Charley who played on the team and introduced him to her sister, Pearl. Pearl Peoples was the eldest daughter of eight children. Her mother was frail and much of the responsibility for the family cooking and management fell on Pearl's shoulders. When she was in her early 20's she went into Park River to clerk in the dry goods section of a department store. She loved the work and her contacts with people. She had been employed there five years when she met Charley in Minto. A courtship began for Pearl and Charley and wedding bells were soon set. On Christmas Eve under a large white wedding bell, at the country home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Peoples, the couple were united in marriage. Due to inclement weather the young couple had to spend the first night on the farm...in separate bedrooms. But the next day they left by train for an extended honeymoon to Minneapolis and then to California for the winter, returning to the Gilby community after the first of April. Ten months following their marriage she had her first born, followed with a child again at 13 months, 18 months and 22 months apart with the youngest born five years later. In the order of their birth they are: Merle Ruth, Kenneth Gilby, Donna Louise, Samuel Abner and Charles Orrin. Pearl was a busy mother and a hired girl was employed to help during the busy seasons on the farm. She sewed for her family and participated in local church activities, P. T. A., Homemakers and the Order of the Eastern Star. Her parents, sisters and brothers and their families all lived within driving distance. Family gatherings were frequent and every holiday brought all her family together alternating the feasting and entertainment at each home. Pearl loved picnics and lunches were always packed for trips to visit families at a distance, at the annual county fair or just to go berry picking. The praise and encouragement given her growing children during these years are some of their fondest memories of her.