Abner Nathaniel Abbey


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Abner Nathaniel Abbey was born August 9, 1849, in Clarke Twp., Newcastle Dist., Durham Co., Canada West, and died September 26, 1929, in Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND, at age 80. Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. He is the son of Nathaniel Abner Abbey of Dutchess County, Province of New York, and Mary Louisa "Polly" Nugent of County Cavan, Ireland.

Emma Gilby was born January 10, 1848, in St. John Parish, City of York, Micklegate, County Yorkshire, England, was Christened February 6, 1848, in York, County Yorkshire, England, and died July 19, 1928, in Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND, at age 80. Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. She is the daughter of John Gilby of Kirton, County Lincolnshire, England, and Alisemon Elizabeth "Alise" Straw of the City of Lincoln, County Lincolnshire, England.

Abner Nathaniel Abbey and Emma Gilby were married July 29, 1884, in Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND.

Abner Nathaniel Abbey and Emma (Gilby) Abbey had two children:

  1. Alisemon Emily Abbey: Born September 4, 1885, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died October 4, 1973, in King Co., WA (age 88). Married October 11, 1916, in Grand Forks Co., ND, to Adam Walker "Add" Taylor: Born August 15, 1882, in New York; Died September 23, 1956, in Tacoma, Pierce Co., WA (age 74).
  2. Charles Gilby Abbey: Born September 20, 1887, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died June 15, 1959, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND (age 69). Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Married December 24, 1917, in the Peoples' country home in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND, to Pearl Georgina Peoples: Born September 20, 1889, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND; Died December 3, 1959, in San Diego, San Diego Co., CA (age 70). Buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.



TIMELINE

Ontario was known as: "Upper Canada" from December 26, 1791, to February 10, 1841; "Canada West" from February 10, 1841, to July 1, 1867; and "Ontario" after July 1, 1867.


Abner Nathaniel Abbey and Emma (Gilby) Abbey are buried in Prairie Home Cemetery, City of Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Charles and Pearl Abbey are also buried there. Pearl's mother, Alise Gilby, along with her second husband, James Gilby, are also buried there. John Gilby, Jr., is also buried there. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


Emma Gilby was born January 9, 1848, in St. John Parish, City of York, Micklegate, County Yorkshire, England.

Abner Nathaniel Abbey was born August 9, 1849, in Clarke Twp., Newcastle Dist., Durham Co., Canada West.

Nathaniel Abner Abbey, Abner's father, died March, 1849, in Clarke Twp., Durham Co., Canada West at about age 52.

After the death of Abner's father in 1849 in Canada, Abner's mother, Mary (Nugent) Abbey, became a resident of Wisconsin, locating in Sheboygan Co. with her children, where she purchased a claim. She made her home on the farm for two years.

In 1851, Abner's widowed mother, Mary (Nugent) Abbey, sold her Sheboygan Co., WI land interests to her dead husband's brother, Orrin Abbey, and returned to Canada with her children Isaac, Sarah, Elizabeth, Orrin, Frances and Abner (except for Wellington who went to Fond du Lac Co., WI), where she spent the remainder of her days. She died at her home in Millbrook, Ontario, Canada in 1888, and is buried beside her husband.

The 1851 UK Census as of March 30, 1851 shows John Gilby (age 36) born in Kirton, County Lincolnshire, England is a Grocer Master employing one man and living at 6 New Bridge Street, St. John Parish, City of York, Micklegate, County Yorkshire, England. Living with him is his wife Elizaman Gilby (age 34) born in the City of Lincoln. Also living there are their children, all born in York: Emily Gilby (age 6); James Gilby (age 5); Emma Gilby (age 3); and John Straw Gilby (age 1). John's widowed father also lives there: Jas. Gilby, Sen., (age 70) a Retired Farmer born in Willsby, County Lincolnshire, England. The assistant grocer and two house servants also live there.

In 1855, John Gilby was still listed as a Grocer at 6 New Bridge Street.

Abner Abbey grew up and was educated in Canada.

In April 1870, when he was twenty years old, Abner emigrated from Canada through Charlotte, NY, (very near Rochester, NY) to Fond du Lac Co., WI, and resided there for two years.


   

Abner Abbey's Citizenship Papers. Charlotte, NY, is located along the south shore of Lake Ontario, and appears now to almost be incorporated into the City of Rochester, NY, which is just to the south of Charlotte.

Leigh Larson note: Charles Sorell, one of those listed in 1892, died February 23, 1907. Buried in Memorial Park Cemetery, Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND.


The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 6, 1870, shows Abner Aby (age 19) born in Canada, is a Farm Laborer, and is living in Byron Twp., Fond du Lac Co., WI. He is living in the Alfred Bliss household, a farmer. He is only three houses away from his brothers Wellington and Orrin.

About 1872, Abner visited Montana, and then spent some time in the southern states where he drove a stagecoach.

In 1873, Abner came to Dakota Territory and began an exciting adventure when he joined the government service. For two years he drove a mule train, having one train of the four hundred and six mule trains plying between Fort Abercrombie, south of Fargo, to Fort Lincoln, near Bismarck.

The following year he was with the party that surveyed the Canadian boundary.

In 1880, Abner came to Grand Forks Co., ND, and that year filed a pre-emption claim four miles southeast of the present site of Gilby.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 29, 1880, shows A. Abby (age 30) born in Canada to Michigan-born parents is an unmarried Teamster Servant to the Canadian-born Sheriff, Richmond Fadden, living in a boarding house in Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., Dakota Territory.


Patentee Name      State     County            Land Office    Issue Date    Doc. Nr.    Acres        Accession/Serial Nr.

Abbey, Abner          ND     Walsh                Montana         4/9/1881       473         160                NDMTAA 096644 


Abner Nathaniel Abbey and Emma Gilby were married July 29, 1884, in Grand Forks, Grand Forks Co., ND.


Emma and Abner Abbey, possibly an 1884 wedding picture.


Patentee Name      State     County            Land Office    Issue Date    Doc. Nr.    Acres        Accession/Serial Nr.

Abbey, Abner          ND     Grand Forks      Montana         10/20/1884    5984       160                NDMTAA 095217 


Alisemon Emily Abbey was born September 4, 1885, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

The 1885 North Dakota Territorial Census shows Abner Abbey (age 34) born in Canada is a Farmer living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him is wife Emma Abbey (age 27) born in Canada. Abner Abbey (age 38) born in Ontario, Canada is also listed as a Farmer in Walsh Co.

Charles Gilby "Charley" Abbey was born September 20, 1887, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND.

In 1888, Abner's mother, Mary (Nugent) Abbey, died at her home in Millbrook, Ontario, Canada, and is buried there beside her husband, Nathaniel Abner Abbey.

Abner Abbey applied for U.S. citizenship on March 28, 1888, in Grand Forks Co., ND.


The Abner Abbey family, about 1890.


Abner Abbey became a U.S. citizen on January 28, 1892, in Grand Forks Co., ND.


Patentee Name      State     County            Land Office    Issue Date    Doc. Nr.    Acres        Accession/Serial Nr.

Abbey, Abner          ND     Grand Forks      Montana         5/5/1893        14864     160                NDMTAA 095359


North Dakota gained statehood in 1889.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 27, 1900 shows Abner Abbey (age 50) born August 1849 in Canada and having emigrated in 1870 and a Naturalized citizen is a Farmer living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him is his wife of 16 years, Emma Abbey (age 52) born June 1848 in England and having emigrated in 1882, who is Keeping House. Also living there are his two children, both born in North Dakota to Canadian and English-born parents: Aliecmon Abbey (age 14) born September 1885; and Charles Abbey (age 12) born September 1887. Also living there are his Uncle and Mother: James Gilby (age 80) born May 1820 in England to English-born parents, having emigrated in 1852 and a Naturalized Citizen; and Alisemon Gilby (age 84) born April 1816 in England to English-born parents, and having emigrated in 1853, with all four of the children born to her still alive. One Servant and two Boarders also live in the household.

On June 1, 1908, Abner and Emma purchased a house in the City of Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND.


The entire Abner Abbey family, with Alisemon (Straw) (Gilby) Gilby, 1909


Old picture of Gilby, ND.


The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 16, 1910, shows Abner Abby (age 60) born in Canada to Pennsylvania and Irish-born parents and having emigrated in 1870 and a Naturalized Citizen is a Farmer (own income) living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him is his wife of 26 years, Emma Abby (age 62) born in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1882, with both of the children born to her still alive. Also living there is his unmarried daughter, Alisemon E. Abby (age 24) born in North Dakota to Canadian and English-born parents.

The 1915 North Dakota State Census taken on April 1, 1915, shows Abner Abby (age 65) born in United States is living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him are: Emma Abby (age 66) born in United States; and Elisman Abby (age 29) born in United States.


Emma (Gilby) Abbey reading a book.


The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 17, 1920, shows Avner Abby (age 70) born in Canada to Pennsylvania and English-born parents is a Rental Farmer owning his home living in Gilby, Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him is his wife, Emma Abby (age 71) born in England to English-born parents. Both are naturalized citizens. 

The 1925 North Dakota State Census taken on April 1, 1925, shows Abner Abbey (age 76) born in a Foreign Country is living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him is Emma Abbey (age 77) born in a Foreign Country. The A. W. Taylor family lives adjacent to them.

The 1925 North Dakota State Census taken on April 1, 1925, shows A. W. Taylor (age 42) is living in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND. Living with him is Alisemon Taylor (age 39). Also living there are: Robert Taylor (age 8); Dorthy Tayor (age 4); and Jean Tatlor (age 1). The Abner Abbey family lives adjacent to them.

Emma (Gilby) Abbey died July 19, 1928, in Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND, at age 80.

Abner Nathaniel Abbey died September 26, 1929, in Gilby, Grand Forks Co., ND, at age 80.


The Bismarck Tribune, Bismarck, ND, Friday, September 27, 1929

GILBY PIONEER DEAD

Gilby, N. D., Sept. 27. Abner Abbey, 80, one of the earliest pioneers of this community, died Thursday night. Funeral services will be held here Sunday.


ABNER ABBEY 

Among the pioneers of North Dakota the subject of this article deserves mention in any work purporting to be a history of the progress and development of the state, and especially of Grand Forks county. He became one of the first settlers of Gilby township, on section 24, in 1880. In 1889 he removed to section 27, where he has resided continuously since.

Mr. Abbey was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, August 9, 1849. His parents were Abner and Mary (Nugent) Abbey, the former being a Pennsylvanian by birth, and the latter a native of the north of Ireland. The father moved to Canada, where he spent the last years of his life. Five sons and two daughters were born of this union, of whom four sons and one daughter are now living, their various places of residence being Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska and North Dakota. Four sons served in Wisconsin and Minnesota regiments during the Civil war, one son dying at Mobile from sickness contracted from exposure.

Abner Abbey was reared and educated in Canada, and in 1870 removed to Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, and resided for two years in that state. He then visited Montana and spent some time in the southern states. Finally, in 1880 he came to Grand Forks county, North Dakota, and during the same year filed a pre-emption claim to a portion of section 24, Gilby township. He has made many and valuable improvements on section 27, and is now the owner of one and a half sections of the best and most valuable lands in the county. His buildings are of the most modern and convenient pattern, and his home is one of the most comfortable and commodious of farm properties in North Dakota.

Mr. Abbey was married, in 1884, in Grand Forks, to Miss Emma Gilby. Mrs. Abbey is a native of England, her parents, John and Alisemon (Strow) Gilby, having emigrated from that country to Canada in 1853. They had three sons and one daughter, Mrs. Abbey. Two of the sons, James and George, settled in Grand Forks county in 1879, in the township that has been named for them. Mr. and Mrs. Abbey have two children, Alisemon E. and Charles G., both of whom are living. A portrait of Mr. Abbey and his excellent wife is contained in these pages. In political faith Mr. Abbey is a Republican. He has been active in public affairs of a local nature and has filled various local offices. He assisted in the organization of the township of Gilby, and has been an influential citizen since the settlement of the county. He has been prosperous and successful, gaining his present valuable holdings by industry and good business judgment, as he came to North Dakota with nothing and began at the bottom.


ABNER ABBEY

Spouse: EMMA GILBY

Abner Abbey was born in the province of Ontario, Canada on August 9, 1849. His parents were Abner and Mary (Nugent) Abbey, the former being a Pennsylvanian by birth and the latter a native of the north of Ireland. The father moved to Canada where he spent the last years of his life. Five sons and two daughters were born of this union, and they resided in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska and North Dakota. Four sons served in Wisconsin and Minnesota regiments during the Civil War, one son dying at Mobile from an illness contracted from exposure.

Abner Abbey grew up and was educated in Canada. When he was twenty-one he moved to Fond du Lac county in Wisconsin and resided there for two years. He then visited Montana and spent some time in the southern states where he drove a stagecoach.

In 1873, Abner came to the territory of Dakota and began an exciting adventure when he joined the government service. For two years he drove a mule train, having one train of the four hundred and six mule trains plying between Fort Abercrombie, south of Fargo to Fort Lincoln near Bismarck. The main line of the Northern Pacific Railway was being surveyed. General George A. Custer was in command of the cavalry that protected the great supply train of prairie schooners and herds of cattle. Abner had a wealth of interesting stories to tell about those wild days. His recollections of General Custer and the many skirmishes with the Indians and the attacks of the buffalo on the cattle were many. One story that he told his grandson was of an incident when Abner's wagon had become disabled. The wagon train was forced to move on to a safer place before nightfall. Abner, left alone repaired the damage to his wagon by dusk, but just then a band of Indians arrived. The chief motioned for him to follow them. He had no choice but to obey. When they reached the Indian encampment the squaws were preparing the evening meal. Abner perceived they were making a stew from some animal. Upon closer observation he noted they hadn't removed the fur or feet and that it was dog stew. The chief motioned for him to help himself. Abner declined saying, "Thank you, but I'm not hungry." The chief became stern and again motioned him to eat. He looked around and saw the hostile faces of other Indians and not daring to offend them further he ate the stew. He had received a compliment from General Custer for his completion of a successful mission through difficult terrain in Indian territory. Of this he was proud. The following year he was with the party that surveyed the Canadian boundary.

In 1880 Abner came to Grand Forks County, North Dakota and that year filed a pre-emption claim four miles southeast of the present site of Gilby. Here the Gilby brothers, George, James and John homesteaded. In 1882 Miss Emma Gilby came to keep house for her brothers. Emma and her three brothers had emigrated from York, England with their parents, John and Alisemon (Strow) Gilby to Canada in 1853. Accompanying them were several uncles and aunts making a total of ten Gilbys who sailed for three weeks on a sailing vessel to the new land.

It was when Abner came to discuss a land sale with the Gilbys that he met their sister, Emma. A romance began and in 1884 Abner and Emma were married in Grand Forks. A daughter, Alisemon was their first born. In the fall two years later, a second child was expected. Abner had business in Grand Forks and he left by horse and buggy for the two day trip. Arrangements were made with the Lewis family who lived a short distance away, that if Emma needed help she could signal them by placing a lighted lamp in the east window. In the early morning hours of September 20th, sharp pains indicated an early birth. Emma attempted to get out of bed to light the lamp. Halfway to the window she stumbled and fell to the floor and her baby boy, Charles Gilby was born there. She was able to tend to her own needs and it was here Abner found her and their son upon his return from Grand Forks.

Abner made many and valuable improvements on his land. He was the first to plant trees in the area. His buildings were of the most modern and convenient structures and his home was described as being one of the most comfortable and commodious of farm properties in North Dakota.

In political faith, Abner was a Republican. He had been active in public affairs in the local community and had filled various local offices. He assisted in the organization of the township of Gilby, and had been an influential citizen during the settlement of the county. He became prosperous and successful, gaining his valuable holdings by industry and good business judgment, as he came to the Dakota's with few possessions.

Emma, his wife was a diminutive lady who was known for her gentleness and kindness to friends and neighbors. She adored her children and often made trips with them to visit relatives in Winnipeg and Toronto, Canada, staying several weeks at a time. On the farm there was always a crew of men to be boarded. A hired girl was employed most of the time. At times during the busy harvest season, Emma and her daughter would bake pies and bread and walk two miles west of the farmstead to prepare the rest of the meal in a small claim shanty.

Their children attended a rural school a half mile south of the farm. The Abbey family usually boarded the teacher and the school was known as the Abbey School. The building was heated by a wood stove which would not hold fire overnight. It wouldn't "take" cord wood, so each noon the bigger boys sawed enough wood to last until the next noon. The teacher was paid thirty dollars a month and the term was often divided into three month sessions, depending upon the weather and farm work. The small schoolroom had two rows of double desks, one on each side of the stove. Later, Charley attended Interstate Business College in Grand Forks.

Charley owned the first car in the community, a Buick. He was sometimes hired to taxi salesmen and businessmen who came by train to Gilby and needed transportation in the area.

Emma's father (John) passed away in Canada and her mother married her husband's brother (James). When they reached their senior years, Emma and Abner had them come to Dakota to live with them. They lived to be over ninety years of age and Emma cared for them until their death.

On June 1, 1908 Abner and Emma purchased a house in Gilby. They lived there and Abner commuted to the farm each day. Gradually the farming operation was taken over by Charley their son. Each was eighty years of age when they passed away, Emma in 1928 and Abner in 1929.


Name                    Country                       Date                              Papers               County

Abbey, Abner       Canada                        March 28, 1888            1st                     Grand Forks 

Abbey, Abner       Canada                        January 28, 1892         2nd                    Grand Forks 

Gilby, Frank        Canada                         April 19, 1880              1st                     Grand Forks

Gilby, Frank        Canada                         November 01, 1890      2nd                    Grand Forks    

Gilby, George       England                       June 10, 1879              1st                     Grand Forks   

Gilby, George       England                       June 14, 1884              2nd                    Grand Forks

Gilby, James        England                       June 10, 1879              1st                      Grand Forks 

Gilby, James        England                       March 01, 1890            2nd                     Grand Forks 

Gilby, John          England                       April 24, 1880              1st                      Grand Forks 

Gilby, John          England                       August 07, 1885           2nd                     Grand Forks 


Roster of the Men and Women who served in the Army or Naval Service (including the Marine Corps) of the United States or its Allies from the State of North Dakota in the World War, 1917-1918 Volume 2 Flagg to Lark

Name: Alton Charles Gilby
Army #: 2,560,930
Registrant: yes, Grand Forks county
Birth Place: Grand Forks, N. Dak.
Birth Date: 29 Mar 1893
Parent's Origin: of Canadian parents
Occupation: student
Comment: inducted at Grand Forks on March 30, 1918; sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa; served in 163rd Depot Brigade, to April 28, 1918; Sanitary Detachment, 138th Infantry, to Jan. 17, 1919; Medical Detachment, 138th Infantry, to discharge; overseas from May 3, 1918, to April 28, 1919. Engagement: Defensive Sector: Gerardmer (Alsace). Discharged at Camp Dodge, Iowa, on May 12, 1919, as a Private.