John H. Armstrong




John H. Armstrong was born April 11, 1795, in Caintown, Province of Quebec, and died April 24, 1848, in Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY, at age 53. Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY. He is the son of John Nelson Armstrong of New York City, NY, and Rebecca Cain of Claverack, Columbia Co., NY.

Mary B. "Polly" Wood was born 1800 in Leeds, Leeds and Grenville United Counties, Upper Canada, and died 1878 in Hannibal, Granby Twp., Oswego Co., NY, at about age 78. Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY. She is the daughter of Captain John Wood of Brooklyn, Kings Co., Province of New York, and Rebecca Cain (1800 - 1825) (the daughter of Isaiah (Josiah) Cain and Catherine Unknown) of Albany, Albany Co., Province of New York.

John H. Armstrong (about age 20) and Mary B. "Polly" Wood (about age 15) were married by banns, January 2, 1815, in Yonge Twp., Leeds Co., Upper Canada, British Colonial America. Witnessed by Tho's. Armstrong, John Kinkaid.

John H. Armstrong and Mary B. "Polly" (Wood) Armstrong had ten children:

  1. Edward H. Armstrong: Born about 1817, in Yonge, Canada; Died Unknown. Married about 1847, in Unknown, to Nancy Ann Unknown: Born 1832, in England; Died after 1860, in Unknown.
  2. Jeremiah Frazer Armstrong: Born September 8, 1819, in Escott, Upper Canada; Died January 27, 1911, in Cornwall Division, Stormont Co., Ontario, Canada (age 91). Married January 8, 1844, in Lansdowne, Leeds Co., Ontario, to Mary Griffin: Born April 8, 1827, in Lansdowne, Leeds Co., Ontario, Canada; Died November 1, 1915, in Cornwall Division, Stormont Co., Ontario, Canada (age 89).
  3. David Wilson Armstrong: Born about 1821 in Canada; Died February 23, 1895, in Oswego, Oswego Co., NY (about age 75). Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY.. Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Married about 1848 in New York, to Eliza Ann Unknown: Born about 1827 in New York; Died after 1892, in Unknown. They had a son, Nelson Ernest Armstrong: Born about 1865, in Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence Co., NY; Died September 6, 1951, in Oswego, Oswego Co, NY (age 86). Buried in Riverside Cemetery, Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Also Ellen L. Armstrong: Born about 1849 in New York; Died Unknown. Also David Wilson Armstrong Jr.: Born February 3, 1865, in St. Lawrence Co., NY; Died Unknown. Frederick L. Armstrong: Born about 1852, in New York; Died Unknown. Clarissa A. Armstrong: Born about 1854, in New York; Died Unknown.
  4. Samuel Bolton Armstrong: Born April 19, 1822, in Lansdowne or Edwardsburgh, Canada West (Ontario); Died August 28, 1921, in Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI (age 99). Buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI. Married (1) 1844, probably in Newfoundland, Canada, or Hounsfield, Jefferson Co., NY, to Mary Feavel: Born about 1823 in Oswego Co., NY; Died about 1851 in Unknown (about age 23). Married (2) September 19, 1858, in Oswego Co., NY, to Delilah Matilda Jones: Born March 30, 1841, in New Hartford, Oneida Co., NY; Died August 29, 1902, in Lodi, Columbia Co., WI (age 61). Buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Lodi, Columbia Co., WI. Divorced about 1870 in Sauk Co., WI. Married (3) April 9, 1876, in Baraboo Twp., Sauk Co., WI, to Lois (Coan) (Brown) Wiser: Born February 1831 in Michigan; Died June 27, 1906, in Sauk Co., WI (age 75).
  5. Eleanor Armstrong: Born about 1828, in Yonge, Canada; Died 1864 in Granby, NY (about age 36). Married to Thomas Feavel: Born about 1817, in England; Died after 1875, in Unknown.
  6. George Wood Armstrong: Born September 10, 1837, in Lansdowne, Leeds Co., Ontario; Died December 13, 1920, in Minetto, Oswego Co., NY, at age 83. Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Married (1) 1859 in Unknown, to Mary A. Unknown: Born 1841 in Canada; Died May 23, 1904, in Granby, Oswego Co., NY (age 63). Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Married (2) May 9, 1907, in Oswego Co., NY, to Orlie Ada (Armstrong) Thompson: Born February, 1859, in Virginia; Died November 8, 1933, in Fulton, Oswego Co., NY (age 74). Buried in Mount Adnah Cemetery, Fulton, Oswego Co., NY.
  7. Clarissa H. Armstrong: Born July 22, 1838, in Lansdowne, Leeds Co., Ontario; Died May 13, 1917, in Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI (age 78). Buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI. Married June 6, 1855, in Portage, Columbia Co., WI, to Samuel Luther Griswold: Born November, 1828, in New York; Died November 27, 1912, in Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI (age 84). Buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI.
  8. James Delos Armstrong: Born April 26, 1840, in Canada; Died October 2, 1922, in Granby, Oswego Co., NY (age 82). Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Married January 5, 1865, in Oswego Co., NY, to Catherine Pennock: Born April 11, 1842, in Leeds Co., Canada West; Died December 7, 1920, in Granby, Oswego Co., NY (age 79). Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY.
  9. John Nelson Armstrong: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.
  10. Clara Armstrong: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.
  11. Jane Armstrong: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.
  12. Ebenezer Armstrong: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.



TIMELINE

Ontario was known as: "Upper Canada" from December 26, 1791, to February 10, 1841; "Canada West" from February 10, 1841, to July 1, 1867; and "Ontario" after July 1, 1867.


   

John H. Armstrong and Mary B. "Polly" (Wood) Armstrong are buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Other Armstrong families are buried there too. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making these images available.


Four Armstrong siblings, including, left to right: Clarissa H. (Armstrong) Griswold, possibly Jeremiah Frazer Armstrong, Samuel Bolton Armstrong, and possibly George Wood Armstrong, before 1917. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan, who found this photo among the effects of her great-grandmother, Cora Adella (Armstrong) (Abbey) Thompson.


Extract from "Brockville Recorder & Times" -- 15 August 1905

"Going away back to the time of the religious strife between Catholics and Protestants in Germany, in the year 1530, a family from thence named William, James and Elizabeth Wood came to New York. William married an English lady, by whom he had a son John, who became a baker by trade. This John, the baker, also married, and among his sons was one John, who became proprietor. The hotelman reared a family, one of whom was John Wood, who was a U.S. pioneer and later became Capt. John Wood in the Continental army in New York. He married there and had a son and daughter, William and Betsey. She afterwards was Mrs. Ebenezer Moore. In the year 1779, the Captain was captured by the British at Quebec, put in a dungeon four years and ten days. During the captivity his wife and children came over to Canada, and in 1791(4), he went in search of them, and finding them settled in Caintown in the township of Yonge, County of Leeds, Province of Upper Canada, he never returned to live in the States but became subject to Great Britain, and being of a somewhat jovial turn of mind, often said he would flog a son of his who would refuse to become a British subject. His children are William, Betsey, Isaiah, David, Mary, Hafey and George.

Mary married John H. Armstrong whose son George W. began about 18 years ago to search for evidence in the case of his grandfather, Captain John Wood, regarding Governmental bounty for his services in the U.S. revolutionary war, and for which he had never received remuneration. He had been very successful in obtaining important evidence, and is hopeful of securing a sum from the funds of Uncle Sam. The military commissioners at Washington, D.C. have acknowledged this much."

1901 -- (The body of Capt. John Wood was disinterred by his grandson George Wood Armstrong, and reburied in the Lewis Corners Cemetery, Granby Twp., Oswego Co., N.Y.)


John H. Armstrong was born April 11, 1795, in Caintown, Province of Quebec.

Mary B. "Polly" Wood was born 1800 in Leeds, Leeds and Grenville United Counties, Upper Canada.

John H. Armstrong (about age 20) and Mary B. "Polly" Wood (about age 15) were married by banns, January 2, 1815, in Yonge Twp., Leeds Co., Upper Canada, British Colonial America. Witnessed by Tho's. Armstrong, John Kinkaid.

The 1840 U. S. Census taken shows Thomas Favel is the head of household living in Hounsfield Twp., Jefferson Co., NY. 2 males 20 to 29; 1 male 40 to 49; 2 females 5 to 9; 1 female 10 to 14; 2 females 15 to 19; and 1 female 50 to 59.

John H. Armstrong died April 24, 1848, in Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY, at age 53. Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 16, 1850 shows Samuel Armstrong (age 24) born in Upper Canada is a Brickmaker living in Hounsfield, Jefferson Co., NY. Living with him is Mary Armstrong (age 22) born in Canada. Also living there are two children, both born in New York: Richard W. Armstrong (age 3); and Geo. L. Armstrong (age 5/12). The Thomas Favel family lives next door.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 1, 1850 shows Thos. Feavel (age 33) born in England is living in the 3rd Ward, City of Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: Elenor Feavel (age 22) born in Canada, a Laborer; and Wm. Feavel (age 1) born in New York. Also living there are: Abel Paiyra (age 50) born in Vermont, a Laborer; Dorcas Pairya (age 52) born in Canada;  Mary Armstrong (age 48) born in Canada; Hulda Paige (age 15) born in Canada; Elizabeth Paige (age 9) born in Canada; James Armstrong (age 8) born in Canada; and Geo. Armstrong (age 8) born in Canada.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 16, 1850, shows Thomas Favel (age 58) born in England, a Laborer and is living in Hounsfield, Jefferson Co., NY. Living with him are: Margaret Favel (age 61) born in England; Celia Page (age 19) born in Canada; David Page (age 19) born in Canada; and William Page (age 1) born in New York. The Samuel Armstrong family lives next door.

The 1855 New York State Census taken on June 15, 1855, shows Thomas Favel (age 37) born in England, is a married Farmer, and is living in in the Town of Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: his wife, Eleanor Favil (age 28) born in Canada; William Henry Favil (age 6) born in Oswego Co., NY; and Thomas Edward Favil (age 1) born in Oswego Co., NY.

The 1855 New York State Census taken on June 7, 1855, shows Edward Armstrong (age 37) born in Canada, and a resident of this town for 7 years, and a Naturalized citizen, is living in the Town of Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: his wife, Ann Armstrong (age 32) born in England, and a resident of this town for 7 years; Theodore N. Armstrong (age 5) born in New York, and a resident of this town for 5 years; Charles A. Armstrong (age 3) born in New York, and a resident of this town for 3 years; and Lezer Armstrong (age 10/12) born in New York, and a resident of this town for 10/12 years.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 17, 1860, shows Edward H. Armstrong (age 44) born in Canada, and with personal estate of $100 is a Shoemaker, and is living in the Town of Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: Nancy A. Armstrong (age 38) born in England; Theadore Armstrong (age 11) born in New York; Charles Armstrong (age 8) born in New York; Eleazar Armstrong (age 5) born in New York; Edwin Armstrong (age 3) born in New York; and Sarah E. Armstrong (age 1) born in New York.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 21, 1860, shows James Armstrong (age 19) born in Canada is a Boatman and is living in Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: Mary Armstrong (age 65) born in Upper Canada, a Domestic; and Rosanna Armstrong (age 9) born in New York. Living next door is the Thomas Favil family.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 21, 1860, shows Thomas Favil (age 42) born in England is a Laborer and is living in Granby,  Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: Eleanor Favil (age 31) born in Upper Canada, a Domestic; Wm. Favil (age 11) born in New York; and George Favil (age 3) born in New York. Living next door is the James Armstrong family.

The 1861 Canadian Census taken on January 14, 1861, shows David Armstrong (age 39 at next birthday) born in Upper Canada, and with Episcopal Methodist religion, is a married Shoe Maker, and has a 1 story single family frame house, and is living in Edwardsburg, Grenville Co., Canada West. Living with him are: a married female, Eliza Armstrong (age 34 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion; Frederick Armstrong (age 9 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion; Clarisa Armstrong (age 7 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion; Clarinda Armstrong (age 5 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion; Ellen Armstrong (age 3 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion; and Samuel Armstrong (age 1 at next birthday) born in Upper Canada, and with Episcopal Methodist religion.

The 1861 Canadian Census taken on January 14, 1861, shows S. B. Armstrong (age 38 at next birthday) born in Upper Canada, and with Episcopal Methodist religion, is a married Miller, and has a 1 story single family frame house, and is living in Edwardsburg, Grenville Co., Canada West. Living with him are: a married female, Delila Armstrong (age 20 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion; Richard Armstrong (age 11 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion; and George Armstrong (age 9 at next birthday) born in U. S., and with Episcopal Methodist religion.

The 1865 New York State Census taken on June 17, 1865, shows Mary Armstrong (age 66) born in Canada, is a widowed Head of Household, and is living in Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Living with her is Rosella Armstrong (age 12) born in Oswego Co., NY.

The 1865 New York State Census taken on June 17, 1865, shows Thomas Feavel (age 46) born in England, is a widower Head of Household Shoemaker, and Armstrong (age 66) born in Canada, is a widowed Head of Household, and is living in Granby, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: Wm. H. Feavel (age 16) born in Oswego Co., NY; George V. Feavel (age 8) born in Oswego Co., NY; Mary M. Feavel (age 2) born in Oswego Co., NY; and Jane Keller (age 18) born in Canada, an unmarried House Keeper.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 20, 1870, shows J. D. Armstrong (age 28) born in Canada is a Laborer and is living in Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: Catherine Armstrong (age 27) born in Canada, who is Keeping House; Mary Armstrong (age 71) born in Canada; James F. Armstrong (age 8) born in New York; Ella Armstrong (age 2) born in New York; and a male Baby Armstrong (age 1/12) born in New York.

The 1875 New York State Census taken on June, 1875, shows Thomas Favil (age 75) born in Canada, is a widower Head of Household Farm Laborer, and is living in a  frame house worth $100 in Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: his unmarried son, William Favil (age 24) born in Oswego Co., NY, a Farm Laborer; his unmarried son, George Favil (age 8) born in Oswego Co., NY, a Farm Laborer; and his daughter, Mary Favil (age 12) born in Oswego Co., NY

Mary B. "Polly" (Wood) Armstrong died 1878 in Hannibal, Granby Twp., Oswego Co., NY, at about age 78. Buried in Lewis Cemetery, Granby, Oswego Co., NY.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 8, 1880, shows David Armstrong (age 58) born in Canada to New York and Canada-born parents, is a married Clock Repairer, and is living at 127 West 12th Street, Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: his wife, Eliza Ann Armstrong (age 53) born in New York to Canada-born parents, and with General Weakness for 11 years, who Keeps House; and his son, Nelson E. Armstrong (age 15) born in New York to Canada and New York-born parents, a Laborer.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 8, 1880, shows Frederick L. Armstrong (age 28) born in born in New York to Canada and New York-born parents, is a married Peddler, and is living at 127-1/2 West 12th Street, Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him are: his wife, Dinah Armstrong (age 19) born in New York to England-born parents, who is Keeping House; and his son, Bertie N. Armstrong (age 4/12 January) born in New York to New York-born parents.

The 1892 New York State Census taken on February 16, 1892, shows David Armstrong (age 70) born in Canada, and a U. S. Citizen, is a Laborer, and is living in the 4th Ward, Oswego, Oswego Co., NY. Living with him is Eliza Armstrong (age 64) born in the United States.

 

Ancestry.com 1840 United States Federal Census

Name, Residence(City,County,State)

Thomas Favel , Houndsfield, Jefferson, New York (Page?)

Free White Persons, Including Heads Of Families

Males:

Under 5--
5 & under 10--
10 & under 15--
15 & under 20--
20 & under 30--2 (Born 1810-1820) (Edward and Thomas Jr.?)
30 & under 40--
40 & under 50--1 (Born 1790-1800) (Thomas Sr.?)
50 & under 60--
60 & under 70--
70 & under 80--
80 & under 90--
90 & under 100--
100 & upward--

Females:

Under 5--
5 & under 10--2 (Born 1830-1835) (Celia?)
10 & under 15--1 (Born 1825-1830) (Caroline?)
15 & under 20--2 (Born 1820-1825) (Female)
20 & under 30--
30 & under 40--
40 & under 50--
50 & under 60--1 (Born 1780-1790) (Margaret?)
60 & under 70--
70 & under 80--
80 & under 90--
90 & under 100--
100 & upward--
-----------
I wonder if Celia was also a daughter of Thomas and Margaret Favel, married to David Page??

1850 Census, Hounsfield, Jefferson County, New York, Page 151 (B), Enumerated August 16, Dwelling 421, Family 421, Lines 38-42

Thomas Favel, Age 58, Born abt 1792 England, Laborer

Margaret Favel, Age 61, Born abt 1789 England

Celia Page, Age 19, Born about Canada

David Page, Age 19, Born about Canada

Next Page, Line 1

William Page, Age 1, Born about New York
----------------
1850 Census, City of Oswego Ward 1, Oswego County, New York, Page 28?, Enumerated July 24, Dwelling 440, Family 524, Lines 4-10

Edward Favel, Age 30, Born abt 1820 England, Laborer

Louisa Favel, Age 27, Born abt 1823 New York

Stephen Favel, Age 8, Born abt 1842 New York

Margaret Favel, Age 7, Born abt 1843 New York

Thos Favel, Age 4, Born abt 1846 New York

Edward Favel, Age 3, Born abt 1847 New York

Marone Favel, Age 3 Months, Born abt 1850 New York
----------------
Could this Thomas be a son of Thomas Sr. and Margaret?, and brother to Edward?

1850 Census, City of Oswego Ward 3, Oswego County, New York, (Page 424 212B), Enumerated August 1, Dwelling 487, Family 536, Lines 3-12

Thos Feavel, Age 33, Born about 1817 England, Laborer

Elenor Feavel, Age 22, Born abt 1828 Canada

Wm Feavel, Age 1, Born abt 1849 New York

Abel Paign (Paige), Age 50, Born about 1800 Vermont

Dorcas Paign (Paige), Age 52, Born about 1798 Canada (Female)

Mary Armstrong, Age 48, Born about 1802 Canada

Hulda Paige, Age 15, Born about 1835 Canada

Elizabeth Paige, Age 8, Born about 1841 Canada

James Armstrong, Age 8, Born about 1842 Canada

Geo Armstrong, Age 14, Born about 1836 Canada
---------------
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyjeffer/vrechoun.htm

VITAL RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
1847, 1848, and 1849
TOWN OF HOUNSFIELD

HOUNSFIELD GROOMS

GROOM --Cleaveland, Malon, 16, Hounsfield
BRIDE --Favel, Caroline, 17, Hounsfield
OFFICIAL --Rev. E.G. Townsend
DATE -- Dec 16 1847
--------------
1850 Census, Adams, Jefferson County, New York, Page ?, Enumerated August 17, Dwelling 718, Family 726, Lines 21-23

Mahlon Cleveland, Age 18, Born about 1832 New York

Caroline Cleveland, Age 20, Born about 1830
(Indexed born in Connecticut), Looks like Ca (Canada?)

Julia Cleveland, Age 1, Born about 1849 New York
--------------
1860 Census, Township of Spring Lake, Ottawa County, Michigan, Page 8, Enumerated June 2, Dwelling 78, Family 60, Lines 17-23

Mohlon W. Cleveland, Age 28, Born about 1832 New York, Carpenter

Caroline Cleveland, Age 30, Born about 1830 Canada, Wife

Julia Ann Cleveland, Age 11, Born about 1849 New York

Alphonso W Cleveland, Age 8, Born about 1852 New York

Orvil S Cleveland, Age 6, Born about 1854 New York

Sarah A Cleveland, Age 2, Born about 1858 New York

Willett H Cleveland, Age 3.12, Born about 1860 Michigan

NEXT FAMILY, Dwelling 79, Family 61, Lines 24-27

Henry W Cleveland, Age 24, Born about 1836 New York, Shoemaker

Phebe Cleveland, Age 21, Born about 1839 New York, Wife

Ella Cleveland, Age 6, Born about 1854 Illinois

John Cleveland, Age 2, Born abt 1858 Michigan
--------------
1870 Census, Oshkosh Ward 4, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, Page 38, Enumerated June 25, Dwelling 296, Family 300, Lines 9-17

Mahlon Cleveland, Age 37, Born about 1833 New York, Ship Carpenter

Coraline (Caroline) Cleveland, Age 39, Born about 1831 Canada, Keeping House

Alphonso Cleveland, Age 17, Born about 1853 New York, Ship Carpenter

Orville Cleveland, Age 14, Born about 1856 New York, Ship Carpenter

Sarah Cleveland, Age 11, Born about 1859 New York

Willet Cleveland, Age 9, Born about 1861 Michigan

Edward Cleveland, Age 6, Born about 1864 Wisconsin

Clifford Cleveland, Age 4, Born about 1866 Wisconsin

Daisy M Cleveland, Age 1, Born abt 1869 Wisconsin
--------------
1880 Census, Lake, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, Page 39, Enumerated June 16, Dwelling 242, Family 252, Lines 8-11

Mahlon W. Cleveland, Self, Age 49, Born about 1831 New York, Father born Connecticut, Mother born Massachusetts, Farmer

Caroline Cleveland, Wife, Age 50, Born about 1830 Canada, Parents born England, Keeping House

Edward Cleveland, Son, Age 17, Born about 1863 Wisconsin, Father born New York, Mother born Canada

Clifford Cleveland, Son, Age 13, Born about 1867 Wisconsin, Father born New York, Mother born Canada
--------------
1900 Census, Township of Omro, Village of Omro, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, Enumeration District 131, Enumerated June 20, Sheet 9 A, Dwelling 224, Family 227, Lines 13-18

A W Cleveland, Head, Age 47, Widow, Born November 1852 New York, Father born New York, Mother born Canada (English), Carpenter

Mahlon Cleveland, Father, Age 68, Married 53 Years, Born January 1832 New York, Father born Massachusetts, Mother born Massachusetts, Carpenter

Caroline Cleveland, Mother, Age 69, Married 53 Years, 10 Children, 7 Living, Born October 1830 Canada (English), Parents born England, Immigration Unknown

Adelle Cleveland, Daughter, Age 12, Born December 1887 Minnesota, Father born New York, Mother born Wisconsin

Julia Cleveland, Daughter, Age 10, Born November 1889 Minnesota, Father born New York, Mother born Wisconsin

Mabel Webster, Servant, Age 20, Born October 1879 Wisconsin, Father born Wisconsin, Mother born New York
----------------
Thomas, Ann, Edward, Laura, and Thomas are indexed under Farle (Page 26), and continued on (Page 27), is Stephen, Lydia, Joshua, Edward, Joseph, Margaret, Laura, and Emma, indexed under Favel. This is all one family listed on 2 pages under 2 dwellings.

Was Ann the same person as Margaret? or was she a second wife to Thomas?

1860 Census Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 5th Ward, July 17, Page 26, Dwelling 970, Family 862, Lines 36-40 & Page 27, Dwelling 971, Family 863, Lines 1-8

Page 26--

Thomas Farle, Age 75, Born about 1785 England, Occupation: Farm Lab

Ann Farle, Age 72, Born about 1788 Maryland

Edward Farle, Age 44, Born abt 1816 Canada, Occupation: Bill Poster

Laura Farle, Age 41, Born abt 1819 New York

Thomas Farle, Age 15, Born abt 1845 New York, Occupation: Farm Laborer

Next Page 27--

Stephen Favel, Age 19, Born about 1841 New York, Occupation: Farm Lab

Lydia Favel, Age 18, Born about 1842 Illinois (Indexed as Iowa)

Joshua Favel, Age 8 Months, Born about 1859 Wisconsin

Edward Favel, Age 13, Born about 1847 New York

Joseph Favel, Age 11, Born about 1849 New York

Margaret Favel, Age 7, Born about 1853 Wisconsin

Laura Favel, Age 4, Born about 1856 Wisconsin

Emma Favel, Age 2 Months, Born about 1860 Wisconsin
-----------------
I think I may also have found Ann Feavel, wife of Thomas Feavel, (born 1785 Maryland) living with the Helsor family in the 1870 census. Lovina Helsor was not married to Thomas Feavel yet, and Thomas is not listed here, but..........

1870 Census Burlington, Racine County, Wisconsin, Enumerated June 4, Page 23 (a.k.a. 205), Dwelling 177, Family 172, Lines 13-21

Indexed under Helson

Joshua Helsor, Age 59, Born about 1811 Pennsylvania, Farmer

Martha Helsor, Age 50, Born about 1820 Ohio, Keeping House

Levina Helsor, Age 25, Born about 1845 Illinois

William Helsor, Age 19, Born about 1851 Iowa

Martha Helsor, Age 15, Born about 1855 Michigan

Joshua Helsor, Age 13, Born about 1857 Wisconsin

Stephen Helsor, Age 10, Born about 1860 Wisconsin

Sarah Helsor, Age 7, Born about 1863 Wisconsin

Ann (Fravel) Feavel, Age 81?--Born about 1789? Maryland

Indexed as Ann Fravel, age 31, born abt 1869 Maryland

 

 

 

Our lines intersect with Edward M. Feavel and Josephine Jero (might have been married twice since I also have a Josephine Page married to Edward M. Feavel). We should compare if you are interested. I might note that Josephine's parents were Israel Jero and Sicillia Feavel.

I also have an Ida May Feavel (daughter of Edward M. Feavel and Josephine Page) married to Andrew Charles Winegarden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Emeline Jero was born 26 Sep 1867 in Shiocton, Outagamie Co., Wisconsin, and died 5 Aug 1947 in Grand Rapids, Wood Co., Wisconsin. She was the daughter of 2. Israel H. Jero Sr. and 3. Siscilia Feavel. She married Maylon S. Winegarden 18 Jun 1883 in Arpin, Wood Co., Wisconsin, son of Andrew Winegarden and Unknown. He was born 13 Jan 1858, and died 26 Feb 1925.
   
   

 


Ahnentafel, Generation No. 2

 

2. Israel H. Jero Sr. was born 1812 in E. Canada, and died 1876 in New York.

 

3. Siscilia Feavel was born 1 Mar 1831 in Oswego Co., New York, and died 23 Feb 1913 in Grand Rapids, Wood Co., Wisconsin. She was the daughter of 6. Thomas Feavel and 7. Margaret Lane.
   
  Children of Siscilia Feavel and Israel H. Jero Sr. are:
  i. Josephine M. Jero was born 24 May 1851 in New York, and died 10 Oct 1915 in Grand Rapids, Wood Co., Wisconsin. She married Edward M. Feavel Abt. 1871. He was born 9 Feb 1847, and died 14 May 1913.
  ii. Israel H. Jero Jr. was born 6 Sep 1855 in New York, and died 21 Jan 1934 in Wisconsin Rapids, Wood Co., Wisconsin. He married Sarah Jane Helser 12 May 1879 in Shiocton, Outagamie Co., Wisconsin, daughter of Joshua Helser and Martha Miltida Clinger. She was born 15 Sep 1862 in Milwaukee Co., Wisconsin, and died 10 Jan 1940.
  iii. Thomas Jero was born 6 Sep 1857 in Stoles Corner, Jefferson Co., New York, and died 25 Oct 1931 in Beloit, Rock Co., Wisconsin. He married Roselee Beltzor Abt. 1880. She was born 14 Jun 1860, and died 15 Mar 1926.
  iv. Cecilia Jero was born 1862 in New York, and died 1924. She married Joshua George Myron Helser Abt. 1878 in Wood Co., Wisconsin, son of Joshua Helser and Martha Miltida Clinger. He was born 29 Oct 1856 in Milwaukee Co., Wisconsin, and died 4 Mar 1944 in Beloit, Rock Co., Wisconsin.
  v. Irvin Henry Jero was born 28 Jul 1864 in Genesee Co., New York, and died 4 Oct 1946 in Wenatchee, Chelan Co., Washington. He married Eva Louise Firman 27 Jan 1884 in Sigel, Wood Co., Wisconsin , daughter of Jacob Benjamin Firman and Margaret Mc Carthy. She was born 19 Sep 1860 in Deerfield, Dane Co.,Wisconsin, and died Jul 1928 in Wenatchee, Chelan Co., Washington.
1. vi. Emeline Jero was born 26 Sep 1867 in Shiocton, Outagamie Co., Wisconsin, and died 5 Aug 1947 in Grand Rapids, Wood Co., Wisconsin. She married Maylon S. Winegarden 18 Jun 1883 in Arpin, Wood Co., Wisconsin, son of Andrew Winegarden and Unknown. He was born 13 Jan 1858, and died 26 Feb 1925.
  vii. William Jero was born Jul 1869 in Wisconsin . He married Emma Carrick 1888. She was born Aug 1867.
  viii. Edwin Jero was born 1872 in Wisconsin , and died 18 Oct 1888 in Vesper, Wood Co., Wisconsin.

 


Ahnentafel, Generation No. 3

 

6. Thomas Feavel was born 1797 in Little Paxton, Huntingdon, England.

 

7. Margaret Lane was born 1800 in Little Paxton, Huntingdon, England.
   
  Children of Margaret Lane and Thomas Feavel are:
  i. Ann Feavel was born 18 Sep 1819 in Oswego Co., New York.
3. ii. Siscilia Feavel was born 1 Mar 1831 in Oswego Co., New York, and died 23 Feb 1913 in Grand Rapids, Wood Co., Wisconsin. She married Israel H. Jero Sr. Abt. 1850. He was born 1812 in E. Canada, and died 1876 in New York.

 

 

 

 

The History Of Upper And Lower Canada

 

Upper and Lower Canada were formed by the Constitutional Act of 1791 in response to the wave of United Empire Loyalists moving north from the United States into the French-speaking province of Quebec following the American Revolution (1765-1783). The result was the division of the old Province of Quebec into two colonies, Lower Canada to the east and Upper Canada to the West, each with their provincial legislatures. While Lower Canada retained the seigneurial system, language, and religious institutions of Quebec, Upper Canada developed on a model of British society.

New Settlers Arrive

In the wake of the American Revolution, United Empire Loyalists fled northwards to the Province of Quebec, followed by other English-speaking settlers. By 1790 the influx of new settlers numbered about 10,000. The territories they settled were already occupied by Indigenous peoples, including the Wendat, Tionontatehronnon, and Algonquin. The Loyalists, guided by Sir Frederick Haldimand, settled primarily along the St. Lawrence River in the area of Kingston, along the shores of Lake Ontario by the Bay of Quinte, and around the Niagara Peninsula. While Quebec had been established as a British colony with the Treaty of Paris (1763) and the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the majority of the population remained French-speaking. The English settlers, however, brought with them their own political and religious ideals, and tensions soon arose between the two groups. One key issue was that of land ownership. The Province of Quebec had established a seigneurial system that awarded parcels of land to nobles and religious communities, who then allotted pieces of the land to tenants in return for farming the land. Used to the freedoms they had held in the Thirteen Colonies, the new settlers wanted instead to own their lands in their own right. Similarly, they pushed for representative government, a British system of parliament, and British civil law. Religion was another point of tension. While the Roman Catholic Church was the established Church in Quebec, the new settlers looked to establish their Protestant Church.

In the years prior to the division of Quebec into the Canadas, Britain had hopes that floods of English settlers would anglicize Quebec. Prior to the Loyalist wave, the floods did not materialize. The Quebec Act of 1774 had restored the Catholic Church in Quebec, and the old French civil law, reversing the Royal Proclamation of 1763. The Canadiens were not ready to give up their recently restored privileges.

A New Province

The solution arrived at was the division of Quebec. The British Constitutional Act of 1791 officially divided Quebec into the primarily French-speaking Province of Lower Canada, and the primarily English-speaking Province of Upper Canada. Each province established its own government, with an appointed lieutenant-governor, executive council, legislative council, and elected representative assembly. While Lower Canada retained the seigneurial system, language, and religious institutions of Quebec, John Graves Simcoe, the first lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada, was determined that the new province would be a model of British society.

Defining “Upper” And “Lower”

The territory of Lower Canada extended west from the Ottawa River to the Great Lakes, south of Rupert's Land. Lower Canada extended east from the Ottawa River to the mouth of the St. Lawrence River, including what is now Labrador.

The terms “upper” and “lower” refer to the relative location of each province along the St. Lawrence River, which hints at the importance of rivers as highways for travel in the period. Upper Canada was located nearest the source of the St. Lawrence, “upriver”. In contrast, Lower Canada was closest to the mouth of the St. Lawrence, “downriver” (traveling with the current).

Upper Canada

With the establishment of Upper Canada, the seigneurial system of Quebec was abolished in favor of British freehold land tenure. Established as the official Church of the province, the Anglican Church received preferential treatment, for instance being granted large tracts of land as clergy reserves, "for the support and maintenance of a Protestant Clergy.”

Simcoe established British civil law and trial by jury, established the provincial capital at York (Toronto), and left a legacy of road building and town planning. Promises of free land drew more immigrants to the province. By 1811, the population of new settlers was almost 90,000.

In the early nineteenth-century, control of the province fell to the “Family Compact,” a small Conservative group, loyal to the British Crown. They were chosen from the friends of the lieutenant-governor and appointed to prominent roles within the government. The Family Compact was known for its corruption, granting government positions in return for favors of financial or political support, and preferential treatment of friends and supporters. But they were also “progressive industrialists,” promoting building programs and public works. But their aggressive hold on power, confined to a select elite few, fed political tension.

The War of 1812 was a defining moment for Upper Canada, which generated patriotic myths and heroic figures such as Laura Secord, Sir Isaac Brock, and Tecumseh. The war also strengthened ties with Britain, and immigrants flowed from Britain into Upper Canada in place of the American immigrants whom the war had halted.

As Upper Canada grew, it struggled economically, and by the 1820s had fallen into chronic debt. The province also lacked in infrastructures such as schools, hospitals, and local government. The government’s failings and corruption all contributed to the 1837-1838 rebellion. Early attempts to push through political reform, led by those such as Robert Baldwin, were moderate and unsuccessful. William Lyon Mackenzie took charge of the reformers in 1837 and left them into armed revolt against the government. The rebellion was defeated, but reform would follow.

Lower Canada

The Act of 1791 did not put an end to tensions in what was now, Lower Canada. While the majority of the population remained French-speaking, the British imposed English as the official language. The House of Assembly was divided between the English-speaking Tory Party, and the French-speaking Canadian Party, the House majority. Similarly, two political papers, The Quebec Mercury and Le Canadien voiced the interests of the English merchants and the Canadiens, respectively. Gradually, English began to take over as the language of business; by 1831, 45% of Quebec City’s population was English-speaking, and by 1842 they made up 61% of Montreal’s population.

Lower Canada appeared to thrive as the population boomed, growing from 110,000 in 1784 to 330,000 in 1812. Fur trade and commercial agriculture continued to dominate the economy. The timber trade grew rapidly after 1806 as demand rose, in part to meet the needs for shipbuilding. By 1832, however, the economy was in crisis. The declining price of furs and wheat resulted in a sharp decline in production, and many farmers were reduced to subsistence farming. The Province fell into chronic deficit importing wheat from Upper Canada. By the early nineteenth century, overpopulation had led to land scarcity and an increasing rural population, fueled in part by British immigrants, which contributed to class struggle.

These events and conflicts helped to fan the growing nationalism sentiments which came to a head in the Patriot insurrection of 1837-1838. The subsidy crisis, attributed to the “château clique”, the problem of customs duties between Upper and Lower Canada, and rising ethnic tensions all added fuel to the fire. Tensions boiled over in 1837 and rebellion broke out, “Patriots” taking up arms against the English army. Poor organization proved fatal to the rebellion, and the English response was swift and decisive. In response to the rebellion, Sir John Colborne appointed a special council to govern Lower Canada in place of the House Assembly until 1841.

The Act Of Union

In 1838, Lord Durham, sent to report on the rebellions in Upper and Lower Canada, condemned the “political cliques”, the Family Compact and château clique”. He advocated for the establishment of responsible government and the amalgamation of Canadas into a single Union, as well as the assimilation of the French Canadiens. In 1841, the Act of Union officially united the two Canadas into the single Province of Canada.