Lurenda Abbey


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Thomas Simon Henry was born February 2, 1798, in Drumbess Twp., County Cavan, Ireland, and died September 20, 1879, in Port Oshawa, Whitby East, Home Dist., Durham Co., Ontario, Canada, at age 81. He is the son of John Henery of Ireland, and Nancy Biggar of Ireland. Rev. Thomas Henry was an Elder in the Canadian Christian Church.

Elizabeth "Betsey" Davis was born September 1, 1800, in Unknown, and died November 12, 1829, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Ontario, Upper Canada, at age 29. She is the daughter of George Davis and Eunice Trull.

Thomas Henry and Elizabeth "Betsey" Davis were married July 30, 1817, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Thomas Henry and Elizabeth "Betsey" (Davis) Henry had six children:

  1. Nancy Henry: Born April 6, 1819, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died April 14, 1819, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada (age Infant).
  2. John Henry: Born March 17, 1820, in Oshawa Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died 1885 (about age 65). Married to Elizabeth Nancy "Betsy" Haight: Born 1818 in Unknown; Died 1877 in Unknown (about age 59).
  3. William Henry: Born March 26, 1822, in Oshawa Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died September 23, 1846 (age 24).
  4. George Henry: Born April 10, 1824, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died March 6, 1892 (age 77).
  5. Thomas Simon Henry: Born July 5, 1826, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada; Died 1910 (about age 84).
  6. Ebenezer Elijah Henry: Born September 19, 1828, in Oshawa Twp., Ontario Co., Upper Canada; Died Sunday, February 8, 1915, at his home, Leavenworth, Leavenworth Co., KS (age 87). Buried in Mount Muncie Cemetery, Lansing, Leavenworth Co., KS. Married (1) June 26, 1851, in Dix, Chemung Co., NY, to Harriett E. Mills: Born 1834 in Dix, Chemung Co., NY; Died October 24, 1892, in Leavenworth, Leavenworth Co., KS (about age 58). Married (2) 1894 in Leavenworth, Leavenworth Co., KS, to Alice (Hook) Putney: Born Alice Hook: Born July 14, 1838, in Waldron, Sussex Co., England; Died December 30, 1911, in Leavenworth, Leavenworth Co., KS (age 73). E. E. was a prominent photographer.

Elizabeth "Betsey" (Davis) Henry died November 12, 1829, in Unknown at age 29.

After Elizabeth "Betsey" (Davis) Henry died, Thomas Henry married a Spinster, Lurenda Abbey.

Lurenda Abbey was born May 24, 1808, in Hope Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada, and died March 25, 1888, in Port Oshawa, Whitby East, Home Dist., Durham Co., Ontario, Canada, at age 79. She is the daughter of Nathaniel Abbey of Dutchess Co., Province of New York, and Mary "Polly" Winters of Dutchess Co., Province of New York.

Thomas Henry and Lurenda Abbey were married November 2, 1830, in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Thomas Henry and Lurenda (Abbey) Henry had ten children:

  1. Eliza Jane Henry: Born July 29, 1831, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Upper Canada; Died December 17, 1867, in Oshawa Twp., Durham Co., Ontario, Canada (age 36). Married to Thomas Guy III: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.
  2. James Orrin Henry: Born August 18, 1832, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Upper Canada; Died November 13, 1917 (age 85). Married to Adalaide C. Hall.
  3. Phineas Workman Henry: Born July 18, 1835, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Upper Canada; Died July 20, 1900 in Drayton, Ontario, Canada (age 65). Married 1861 in Ontario, Canada, to Emilinea Hall: Born February 21, 1841, in Upper Canada; Died March 3, 1921, in Drayton, Ontario, Canada (age 79).
  4. Albert Nathaniel Henry: Born January 18, 1837, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Upper Canada: Died August 16, 1917 (age 80). Married Unknown to Harriet Guy: Born 1843; Died 1866 (about age 23).
  5. Elizabeth Ann Henry: Born April 17, 1839, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Upper Canada; Died January 6, 1928 (age 88). Married about 1864 to Edward Dearborn: Born 1837; Died April 10, 1901 (about age 64).
  6. Joseph Gorman Henry: Born December 11, 1841, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Canada West; Died March 1, 1926 in Upland, San Bernardino Co., CA (age 84). Married November 5, 1878, in Canada to Alberta Maxwell Gamsby: Born 1850 in Canada; Died January 22, 1935, in San Bernardino Co., CA (age 84). Buried in Bellevue Cemetery and Mausoleum, Ontario, San Bernardino Co., CA.
  7. Jessie Ezra Henry: Born January 10, 1844, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Canada West; Died September 30, 1930 in Hatzie, BNC, Canada (age 86). Married 1868 in Ontario, Canada, to Arvilla Gamsby: Born about 1850 in Canada; Died Unknown.
  8. Clarissa Ann Henry: Born August 23, 1846, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Canada West; Died September 14, 1927 (age 81). Married December 26, 1868, in Canada to Cassius Lee Stone: Born about 1850 in Canada; Died Unknown.
  9. William Thomas Henry: Born July 27, 1849, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Canada West; Died December 6, 1922 (age 73).
  10. Lurenda Jane "Jennie" Henry: Born May 29, 1852, in Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Canada West; Died October 27, 1935, in Oshawa, Durham Co., Ontario, Canada (age 83). Married January 1, 1872, to John Luke McGill: Born about 1850 in Canada; Died February 21, 1923, in Canada (about age 73).



TIMELINE


   

Dorcas (Abbey) Henry and Lurenda (Abbey) Henry

   

Elder William Henry and Elder Thomas Henry

Shown above is a side-by-side comparison of the Abbey sisters, who married Henry brothers. The family resemblances are quite obvious.


Elder Thomas Henry and Lurenda (Abbey) Henry Museum picture, Henry House, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada.


The Province of Ulster is composed of nine counties: Antrim, Armagh, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry, and Tyrone comprise Northern Ireland, while Cavan, Donegal, and Monaghan are part of the Republic of Ireland.

Ontario was known as: "Upper Canada" from December 26, 1791, to February 10, 1841; "Canada West" from February 10, 1841, to July 1, 1867; and "Ontario" after July 1, 1867.

Between 1885 and the early 1980's Durham County went through considerable changes. Manvers Township became part of Victoria County, Cavan and South Monaghan Townships became part of Peterborough County, and Hope Township became part of Northumberland County.

When Ontario County was abolished in the 1970's, the Townships of Thorah, Brock, Scott, Uxbridge, Pickering, Reach, Whitby and Scugog became part of Durham County.

Thomas Henry, an Elder in the Canadian Christian Church, was born February 2, 1798, in Drumless Twp., County Cavan, Ireland.

Elizabeth "Betsey" Davis was born September 1, 1800, in Unknown.

Lurenda Abbey was born May 24, 1808, in Hope Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada.

Thomas Henry and Elizabeth "Betsey" Davis were married July 30, 1817, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Upper Canada.

Elizabeth "Betsey" (Davis) Henry died November 12, 1829, in Whitby Twp., Durham Co., Ontario, Upper Canada, at age 29.

Thomas Henry and Lurenda Abbey were married November 2, 1830, in Port Hope, Durham Co., Upper Canada.

The 1851 Canadian Census shown Thos. Henry (age 53 at next birthday) born in Ireland, and with Christians religion, is a Farmer, and is living in a one story stone house, Whitby Twp., Ontario Co., Canada West. Living with him are the following, all born in Upper Canada and with Christians religion: Lorinda Henry (age 45 at next birthday); Jas. O. Henry (age 20 at next birthday), a Labourer; Phinas W. Henry (age 17 at next birthday), a Lobourer; Albert N. Henry (age 15 at next birthday), a Labourer; Elizabeth Ann Henry (age 13 at next birthday); Joseph G. Henry (age 11 at next birthday); Jessey E. Henry (age 9 at next birthday); Calrisa A. Henry (age 6 at next birthday); and William T. Henry (age 2 at next birthday). Also living there is: Mary Camson, born in Upper Canada, and with Church of England religion, a Servant; (age 18 at next birthday).

The 1861 Canadian Census shown Thos. Henry (age 62 at next birthday) born in Ireland, and with Christian religion, is a married Farmer, and is living in Whitby East, Ontario Co., Canada West. Living with him are the following, all born in Canada West and with Christian religion: a married female, Lurenda Henry (age 57 at next birthday), a Spinster; an unmarried female, an unmarried male, Thomas Henry (age 26 at next birthday), a Lobourer; an unmarried male, Albert Henry (age 25 at next birthday), a Labourer; an unmarried female, Elizabeth Henry (age at next birthday) a Labourer; an unmarried male, Joseph Henry (age 20 at next birthday) a Labourer; an unmarried female, Jesse Henry (age 17 at next birthday) a Labourer; an unmarried female, Clarissa Henry (age 15 at next birthday) a Labourer; an unmarried male, Wm. Henry (age 12 at next birthday) a Labourer; an unmarried female, Jane Henry (age 9 at next birthday) a Labourer; and an unmarried female, Mary Cameron (age 18 at next birthday), born in Canada West, and with Church of England religion, a Labourer.

The 1861 Canadian Census shown Mary Abby (age 80) born in the United States is a widow and is living in the Henry household, South Waterloo, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Co., Canada West.

The 1871 Canadian Census shown Thos. Henry (age 72 at next birthday) born in Ireland, and with Christian religion, is a Minister, and is living in Whitby East District, Ontario South District, Ontario Co., Canada. Living with him are the following, all born in Ontario, Canada, and with Christian religion: Lunrenda Henry (age 63 at next birthday); William T. Henry (age 21 at next birthday, a Farmer; Jane L. Henry (age 18 at next birthday); Alberta Henry (age 7 at next birthday); and Mrytle Henry (age 5 at next birthday).

Thomas Henry died September 20, 1879, in Port Oshawa, Whitby East, Home Dist., Durham Co., Ontario, Canada, at age 81.


Elder Thomas Henry (1798-1879)

Thomas Henry, "Christian minister, York pioneer, and soldier of 1812" was a pioneer of the Christian Church movement in Canada. Beginning in 1825, Bro. Henry came under the influence of the teachings of the Campbells, and was soon a strong advocate for the restoration movement in Ontario. A farmer and lay preacher, "Bishop" Henry established 17 congregations in and around Oshawa, Ontario, but his influence reached far beyond that harbor town.  He traveled extensively throughout Ontario, Upstate New York, and northeastern Ohio, sharing the Restoration message. Rev. Henry put his faith into action, assisting run away slaves in the underground railroad. He both harbored the fugitive slaves, and sometimes crossed Lake Ontario to New York to carry them into freedom in Canada. Six of Father Henry's twelve sons moved their young families to Southern California, carrying the Christian message with them, and establishing the village of Ontario, California. Spiritual and biological descendants of Mr. Henry are to be found in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), The United Church of Christ, and the United Church of Canada. Thomas Henry is the Great Great Grandfather of our pastor, Dr. Don Baird.


The 1881 Canadian Census shown William T. Henery (age 30 at next birthday) born in Ontario, and with Ch. Christian religion, is a Farmer, and is living in Whitby East District, Ontario South District, Ontario Co., Canada. Living with him are the following, all born in Ontario, Canada, and with Christian religion: a female, Eliza Henery (age 22 at next birthday); and Lurinda Henery (age 73 at next birthday.

Lurenda (Abbey) Henry died March 25, 1888, in Port Oshawa, Whitby East, Home Dist., Durham Co., Ontario, Canada, at age 79.


Lurenda (Abbey) Henry Museum picture, Henry House, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada.

Reverend Thomas Henry

Original photograph of Lurenda (Abbey) Henry

Painting portrait of Lurenda (Abbey) Henry, Henry House, Oshawa, Canada. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Dawn Henry.

Possibly Lurenda Abbey.


Christian Church And An Episode Of 1837, ( Originally Published 1921 )

Elder Thomas Henry

At Darlington in the year 1825 was held the first Christian Conference, in the Province of Ontario. Several years previously Christian Ministers from the State of New York, took a friendly interest in the religious welfare of this district. Visits had been paid by Elders McIntyre, Church, Goff, Blodjet, and Shaw; the latter with Elder Baily organized the church at Darlington, and of this church, Elder Thomas Henry became one of twenty-eight members: His close connection with, and his untiring efforts in behalf of, the Christian Church from 1825, till his death in 1879, includes not only the history of the church, but his own biography as well. In 1818, Elder Henry removed from Toronto to Oshawaon-the-Lake, where he became a homesteader on Lot No. 7, Broken Front. He was born Feb. 2nd, 1798, in County Cavan Ireland. With his father, he came to America in 1811, landing in New York, but having as his destiny, Muddy York, Ontario. Shortly after his arrival, the war of 1812-14, broke out between England and the U.S.A. Thomas Henry, then Only 16 years of age, enlisted and served with the British under General Brock. In 1875, when he had reached his 79th birthday, he was rewarded by his country, in the same way as all other survivors of Queenston and Lundy's Lane, by receiving a gratuity of $20.00 from the Parliament of Canada. In a memoir of Elder Henry, written by his daughter in Law, Mrs. P. A. Henry in 1880, we get an interesting item in regard to the rebellion of 1837.

"The years of the Rebellion will never be forgotten by me. We suffered much on account of our liberal views, and peace principles. I was well acquainted with Vim. Lyon McKenzie ; he was a staunch reformer and a friend to his country. At the commencement of the disturbance he published a paper in Toronto. On account of his liberal views, and some exposures of the Family Compact, he was beset by a mob of their sons, and, I am sorry to say, a son of Archbishop Strachan was among them. They came in the night, broke open his office, and threw his type and press into the lake; but his friends soon got him another press and more type. This cruel act served to bring him before the public, and he was elected member of Parliament. I supported him from principle. I was well acquainted with Lount and Matthews and stood near when they were executed at Toronto as leaders of the Rebellion. I was a witness for Dr. Hunter when he was tried for treason, and the foreman of the jury, told me afterwards it was my evidence that saved him. Having been at his house on the evening of the fight in Toronto, I was able to clear him from being there. 1 was not only a friend to British law and order, but I had much sympathy for many who unwisely took up arms against it."

That is what Mr. Henry says of himself, in connection with the Rebellion, but he does not record, and probably at the time it would not have been safe to record, the many deeds of kindness and Christian charity, performed on behalf of those unfortunate men, who upon the suppression of the outbreak became outlaws and outcasts from home. His house was a refuge and safe asylum for them. Being a native of Ireland, and having taken no active part in the disturbance, he was comparatively free from suspicion. His horse, barn, and even cellar, were often occupied by those who dared not be seen abroad ; here they were concealed, fed and comforted, until an opportunity could be found for them to cross the lake, and take refuge on Republican soil. More than once, his sons and his lonely team met the lonely wanderers at appointed places along the shore of the marsh or lake, and brought them to a safe retreat. And again have the same agents conveyed them to out of the way places, where 'they could embark on some American vessel bound for the "other side."

Many of these incidents were interesting and some quite exciting. John, the eldest son, a wide awake youth of seventeen, the principal actor on such occasions, was in his element; had he been older he might, in spite of parental advice, have been among the agitators.

At one time, about a dozen refugees were concealed in a house some three miles from Oshawa Harbor. Somebody gave John to understand that his services were needed in that direction on a particular night. Without his father's knowledge, he took the team, put all the bells on the horses he could get drove to the place, got the men in the sleigh, drove back through Oshawa about midnight, and had his men on board a schooner before daylight without molestation ; when if he had gone quietly, he would have been suspected, and probably arrested. The schooner was waiting for them in the marsh, that stretches back from the lake at Port Oshawa.

One night after the family had retired, Dr. Hunter, of whom we have spoken, presented himself at Elder Henry's door. He was cautiously admitted, and soon told his trouble in hurried whispers. Fresh evidence of his disloyalty had been obtained, and the officers of the law were on his track. Elder knew well he could do nothing for him outside of the house without awakening suspicion. He therefore conducted him to the room where his sons were in bed. John took in the situation at once and in an incredibly short time was dressed, and had left the house with the medical man, who dared not remain there an hour. They crossed the fields like two shadows, and were soon lost to sight in the wood skirting the marsh. John was familiar with every nook and tree of that wood, and guided the doctor by a circuitous route to a shanty on the border of the marsh, where an old man lived alone. The doctor was soon disposed of in bed, and as it was some time until daylight, the young man sat down to think. It was the latter part of March, and considerable ice was still in the marsh. A vessel that had wintered there was being prepared for sailing. The captain and owners of the vessel, Jesse Trull, was John's uncle, and though he dared not make his business known to his uncle, the relationship would furnish him an excuse for being there. He knew his uncle to be favorably disposed to his cause, yet he felt that he would not risk concealing a refugee on his vessel, which would be thereby subject to confiscation. But the mate, an eccentric man called Billy Barrow, he knew he could depend on for assistance. When daylight came, John went down to the boat, but there a new danger presented itself. Sergeant Martin, a government officer, had been stationed there on purpose to keep refugees from going on board. With a quickness of perception and promptness of action, remarkable in one of his age, the youth took of his coat and went to work with the men, who were clearing away the ice from around the boat. He was soon accosted by Sergeant Martin, who demanded what he was doing there.

"Helping my uncle get his boat off !" was the ready answer.

He worked all day, took his meals with the crew on board, and at night went to the cabin with Billy Barrow. Mr. Trull did not stay on board at night so the two had the cabin to themselves. They had little chance of communication during the day, but they now talked the matter over in whispers, and laid their plans for Hunter's escape. When all others were asleep, John stole away to the shanty, carrying supplies to another morning, another challenge from Sergeant Martin, and another day's work for John. They had hoped to get the boat ready to sail that day, but night came, and it was evident the programme of the last two days was to be repeated.

That night, when John went to carry supplies to his man, he went farther ; and before his return a little red skiff was snugly concealed behind a point nearly a half-mile west from the harbor. The third day drew to a close, and the schooner was free from the ice, and floated out into open water ready to sail in the morning, as soon as she could obtain a "clearance."

Between 12 and 1 o'clock that night, two figures instead of one emerged from the shanty, and proceeded cautiously towards the point where the red skiff was concealed. It was a wild, dark night, but the young man's accustomed feet led the way, and the doctor followed with nervous tread. They reached their 'destination safely, and found the skiff where he had left it. They looked out over the water, and for a moment stood silent, almost irresolute. It was a fearful venture. The wind was blowing almost a gale, breaking the water into yeasty waves, mixed with fragments of floating ice. The case was urgent. The dauntless young man launched his boat among the seething waves, and ordered the doctor to lie flat in the bottom; for the boat was barely safe for two on calm waters, and he knew that with his unaccustomed companion erect in it, they would surely be swamped. The gentleman at first demurred at this arrangement, but being bluntly informed that he must obey orders or he would be left to look after himself, submitted; and the frail craft was soon tossing among the breakers. Clouds of inky blackness enveloped the sky, and entirely hid the schooner from their view, but the intrepid oarsman held on his way steering half by guess, until a fiercer gust of wind made a rift in the clouds, and gave him a glimpse of the masts of the vessel, towards which he steered. As they passed the outlet of the marsh, cakes of ice were floating seaward, and a large piece came in contact with the little skiff, threatening to capsize it. The doctor made a move to rise but an assurance from John, that a blow from his oar would quiet him if he did not keep quiet, caused him to lie still, until they drew up on the leeward side of the vessel, and the little red skiff was made fast to a rope, which John knew would be hanging in a convenient place near the stern of the boat. Shortly after this, two dark figures might have been seen climbing into the schooner, if any one had been there to see them. As it was, only the wind and waves were around them, and the dark clouds above. They stood on the stern deck, and a dark hole, just about large enough to admit a man's body, was before them. This led down into a small dark place only a few feet square, where odds and ends which it was desirable to have out of sight, were usually thrown. Billy Barrow had prepared this place for their passenger. John taking his hand helped him lower himself into his snug quarters, and then putting on the "hatch," was soon after in the berth with the mate, to whom he dared to communicate his success only by a nudge, which was answered in the same way. After waiting until certain that no one had been disturbed Billy Barrow crept softly on deck, and proceeded to put large bolts into the corners of the "hatch," in holes previously bored for them ; to give it an appearance of great security. Then he closed the cracks with oakum and pitch, having previously prepared a place for ventilation from the freight room.

In the morning all was activity on board the boat. About nine o'clock, John Trull, Militia Captain, and brother to the boat owner, came on board to search the vessel. The duty was strictly performed, but as no contraband goods or men were found, the captain got his "clearance;" landsmen, came ashore, the schooner weighed anchor, and sailed away with Dr. Hunter towards the "other side." We know nothing more of his adventure, than that he reached the Republic in safety.


The Thomas Henry House

Thomas Henry, a local minister and active participant in the development of early Port Oshawa, moved his family into this stone house in 1850 where he lived until his death in 1879. The home remained in the Henry family until 1920 at which time the house and land were purchased by R. Samuel and George McLaughlin. They in turn sold the property to the town for $1. Henry House is portrayed as a period home typical of the lifestyles and customs of the Henry Family from the 1850s to the 1890s.


PDF file of Memoir Thomas Henry

PDF file of Thomas Henry Descendants