James Blake Sr.


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James Blake Sr. was born about 1755 in Washington Co., MD, and died September, 1845, in Woodberry Twp., Bedford Co., PA, at about age 90. He is the son of Unknown Blake, and Unknown. 

Sarah Unknown was born about 1770 in Unknown, and died about 1798 in Pennsylvania, at age Unknown. She is the daughter of Unknown.

James Blake Sr. and Sarah Unknown were married before 1789 in Unknown.

James Blake Sr. and Sarah (Unknown) Blake had six children:

  1. Elizabeth Blake: Born May 11, 1789, in Woodbury, Bedford Co., PA; Died before 1845 in Pennsylvania. Married to Unknown Reighart: Born Unknown; Unknown.
  2. Thomas Blake: Born February 29, 1792, in Washington Co., MD; Died February 20, 1830, in Washington Co., MD (age 37). Married (1) June 28, 1808, in Salem Lutheran Church, Lebanon, PA, to Mary "Polly" Mosier: Born Unknown in Unknown; Died Unknown. Married (2) November 29, 1828, in Washington Co., MD, to Ann Morrison: Born Unknown; Died Unknown.
  3. James Blake Jr.: Born January, 1793, in Pennsylvania; Died 1859 in Huston Twp., Blair Co., PA (about age 66). Buried in Rodman Cemetery, Roaring Spring, Blair Co., PA. Married (1) about 1814 in Unknown, to Sarah Ann Unknown: Born 1795 in Pennsylvania; Died before 1847 in Pennsylvania. Married (2) about 1844 in Pennsylvania, to Sarah Gates: Born about 1829 in Pennsylvania; Died before 1879 in Pennsylvania.
  4. Henry Blake: Born February 26, 1795, in Pennsylvania; Died July 28, 1851, in Greenupsburg, Greenup Co., KY (age 56). Married December 1, 1830, in Greenupsburg, Greenup Co., KY, to Martha Ann Hockaday: Born February 14, 1814, in Madison Co., KY; Died July 17, 1837, in Greenup Co., KY (age 23).
  5. Simon Blake Sr.: Born November, 29, 1796, in Washington Co., MD,; Died June, 1849, in Martinsburg, North Woodberry Twp., Blair Co., PA (age 52). Married (1) May 28, 1816, in Washington Co., MD, to Jane Wade: Born 1800 in Washington Co., MD; Died February 13, 1822, in Washington Co., MD (about age 22). Married (2) about 1823 to Nancy "Nannie" Unknown: Born 1801 in Pennsylvania; Died after 1870.
  6. Isaac Blake: Born about November 30, 1798, near Lebanon, PA; Died about 1798 in Pennsylvania (age Infant).

After Sarah died, James Blake Sr. married Ann Burdine.

Ann Burdine was born about 1785 in Pennsylvania, and died about 1834 in Pennsylvania, at about age 50. She is the daughter of Unknown.

James Blake Sr. and Ann Burdine were married about 1799 in Pennsylvania.

James Blake Sr. and Ann (Burdine) Blake had two children:

  1. Burdine Blake Sr.: Born January 13, 1800, in Washington Co., MD; Died August 26, 1874, in Martinsburg, Blair Co., PA (age 74). Buried in Fairview Cemetery, Martinsburg, Blair Co., PA. Married (1) December 14, 1818, in Washington Co., MD, to Mazey Ann "Mary" Simpkins: Born February, 1794, in Hagerstown, Washington Co., MD; Died April 1, 1867, in Martinsburg, Blair Co., PA (age 73). Buried in Fairview Cemetery, Martinsburg, Blair Co., PA. Married (2) November 3, 1867, in Martinsburg, Bedford (now Blair) Co., PA, to Barbara Mary/Margaret/Elizabeth (Weir/Wyre) Stiffler: Born November 22, 1879, in Martinsburg, Bedford (now Blair) Co., PA (age 56). Buried in Claysburg Reformed Cemetery, Claysburg, Blair Co., PA.
  2. Maria Blake: Born about 1804 in Pennsylvania; Died 1804 in Pennsylvania.

After Ann (Burdine) Blake died, James Blake Sr. married Mary "Polly" Unknown.

Mary "Polly" Unknown was born about 1786 in Pennsylvania and died August, 1876, in Pennsylvania at age 90. She is the daughter of Unknown.

James Blake Sr. and Mary "Polly" Unknown were married about 1835 in Pennsylvania.

James Blake Sr. and Mary "Polly" (Unknown) Blake had no children.




TIMELINE


Ogle Co. Portrait and Biographical Album, by Chapman Bros., Chicago, IL, 1886

William S. Blake, a farmer of the Township of Mt. Morris, came to Ogle County in 1869. He was born in Blair Co., Pa., April 25, 1821. Burdine Blake, his father, was a farmer, a native of Washington Co., Md., and was of German extraction. His ancestors, who were farmers, came to this country prior to the period of the Revolution, and settled in the same county which has been named as the native place of the father of Mr. Blake. Burdine Blake learned the trade of a moulder, and was occupied in that business in Washington Co., Md. He operated as mechanic until he married. He formed a matrimonial alliance with Miss Mary Simpkins, Dec. 15, 1818. She was a native of Washington Co., in the State of Maryland, and was of American parentage. Her ancestors were Scotch. After their marriage they removed to the part of Pennsylvania which is now included in Blair County, and where their nine children, seven sons and two daughters, were born. One of the latter is deceased. Mr. Blake is next to the eldest of the first family of children, his father having married after the death of the first wife, which occurred April 1, 1867. Mrs. Barbara Stiffler became his second wife Nov. 3, 1867. She is now deceased. She had been married, and by her first husband was the mother of several children, but none by the second marriage. The father was a local preacher in the interests of the Methodist Church, and lived in Blair county until his death, which transpired Aug. 26, 1874. He was born in 1800.

Mr. Blake was educated in the common schools, and was married in the county in which he was born, May 18, 1843. Miss Catherine Gearhart became his wife. She was born in Washington Co., Md., Oct. 28, 1824. Her parents, Daniel and Elizabeth (Mong) Gearhart, were both natives of the same county, and of unmixed German descent. Her father was a mechanic. The lives of both were passed from first to last wholly within their native county. They were members of the German Lutheran Church. Of seven children, of which Mr. and Mrs. Blake have been the parents, only three survive. Laura is married to Scott Kennedy, of Mt. Morris. He is a mechanic and an Elder in the Christian Church. Millard F. married Miss Jennie Angell, and they live at Mt. Morris; he is a carpenter by trade and is also an Elder in the Christian Church. Franklin is living in Iowa and is a telegraph operator.

Mr. and Mrs. Blake resided in Pennsylvania until 1853, when they went to Washington Co., Md., and Mr. Blake operated there as a farmer until 1869, when he removed to Ogle County. In 1870 he purchased a farm which contained 120 acres, and has since been its owner and occupant. The dwelling occupied by the family is a fine brick structure, and the barns on the farm are of a suitable character, and in keeping with the other buildings on the place.

Mr. Blake is a Republican of decided principles, and has served in several local offices, being now a School Trustee. He and his wife are active workers in the interests of the Christian Church, in which he is a Deacon.


James Blake Sr. was born about 1755 in Lancaster Co., PA.

Sarah Unknown was born about 1770 in Unknown.

James Blake Sr. and Sarah Unknown were married before 1789 in Unknown.

The 1790 U. S. Census shows James Blake is the head of household living in Rapho Twp., Lancaster Co., PA. There are 2 males 16 and over; 1 male under 16; and 2 females.

This township at that time lay along the northern boundary of the county and included the first low range of mountains of the Appalachian chain. Tax records list James Blake as a "founderer" which was an important and skilled job in the iron furnaces which dotted South Mountain from Berks County to the Maryland border. A high grade of iron ore was mined in this area from earliest days to the present time. As mines developed we find the "iron master" taking his skilled workers from place to place, so a study of the movement of the Blake family follows along the line of furnaces from the Mt. Hope Furnace Lancaster Co., where his record first appears, to the furnace in Drumore township near the Susquehanna river, thence to Maryland and back again to Pennsylvania in Franklin, Huntingdon and Blair Counties.

Sarah (Unknown) Blake died about 1798 in Pennsylvania at age Unknown.

James Blake Sr. and Ann Burdine were married about 1799 in Pennsylvania.

James and his first wife, Sarah (maiden name unknown), had five children according to the family record: Elizabeth, Thomas, James, Henry, Simon. There appears in the Salem Lutheran Church record of Lebanon, PA, the baptism of an Isaac Blakes on Nov. 30, 1798 whose parents were James Blakes and wife. No further record of this child has been found, neither do we find a census record for James for the year 1800 so it may be assumed that wife and child may have died and that he was living with his five children with relatives in Pennsylvania or Maryland. He must have remarried shortly after Sarah's death for Ann is the mother of Burdine who was born Jan. 13, 1800. Another child of this marriage, Maria, died in 1804.

The census of 1810 finds James Blake in Drumore Township. In 1815 he buys land from George Withers, iron master, for a consideration of $4,208.00, sells some of it in 1823 as a resident of Woodbury Twp., Bedford Co., but he is listed as a non-resident taxpayer in Drumore Twp., from 1816 to 1828. During this period he was probably working in the furnaces of Huntingdon Co. for we find him and his son, James in Woodbury township of that county for the 1820 census. These two Woodbury townships should not be confused with each other; Woodbury of Huntingdon Co., and North Woodbury of Bedford are now in Blair Co.

Ann (Burdine) Blake died before 1834 in Pennsylvania, at age Unknown.

James Blake Sr.  and Mary "Polly" Unknown were married about 1835 in Pennsylvania.

The Deeds and Orphans Court Records show that James and his sons James, Simon and Burdine with their families were living in Blair County in the vicinity of Martinsburg by 1830. James' will provided that his wife, Polly, was to receive yearly rental or full possession of lot and two houses in Martinsburg as long as she remained a widow. At her death or marriage said property was to be sold and proceeds to be divided equally between "my three sons: James, Simon, and Burdine. Eldest son, James, to have farm on which I now reside, about 70 acres, also desk. Burdine to have 20 acres of woodland adjoining and lying between his other land and that of son Simon Blake, also silver watch. Son Henry Blake now of Kentucky to receive $1,000.00 to be paid him by Simon in consequence of farm sold to him by me, $150.00 annually until the whole is paid. Grandson John Righart $100.00 to be paid by Simon one year after date. Grandchild Ann Blake daughter of son Thomas $50.00; grandchild Sarah Blake daughter of Thomas Blake $75.00 also my bureau." This will was probated Aug. 28, 1845.

The 1840 U. S. Census shows Birdine Blake (age 40 to 50) is living in North Woodbury, Bedford Co., PA. Living with him is his wife (age 40 to 50). Also living there are their children: 2 males 5 to 10, and one male 10 to 15, and 1 male 15 to 20, 2 females 5 to 10, 1 female 10 to 15, and 1 female 15 to 20. James Blake (age 70 to 80) is living next door with his wife (age 50 to 60). Also in the household are: 1 male 10 to 15; 1 female 15 to 20, and 1 female 20 to 25.

James Blake Sr. died 1845 in Woodbury Twp., Bedford Co., PA, at about age 90.


James Blake, late of Woodberry Township. Will dated August 6, 1834; probated October 8, 1845. Wife, Polly; Children: James, Simon, Burdine, Henry now in Kentucky; grandson John Righart; Granddaughters: Ann Blake and Sarah Blake, daughters of Thomas. 

Executors: Son Burdine and Friend Samuel Hoover. 

Witnesses: James Stevens, John McKiernan 

(Source: Bedford County, Pennsylvania, Will Book - Volume II & III, Page 336)


The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 28, 1850 shows Sarah Miller (age 41) born in Pennsylvania is living in Martinsburg Borough, Blair Co., PA. Living with her is Columbus Miller (age 1) born in Pennsylvania. Also living there are: Polly Blake (age 64) born in Pennsylvania; and Simon Blake (age 26) born in Pennsylvania. Leigh Larson note: Polly is the third wife of Simon's grandfather, James Blake, and is therefore Simon's step-grandmother.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 28, 1850 shows Nancy Blake (age 49) born in Pennsylvania with real estate worth $2,500 is living in Martinsburg Borough, Blair Co., PA. Living with her are the following, all born in Pennsylvania: Samuel Blake (age 19) a Farmer; Elizabeth Blake (age 15); Eston Blake (age 9); and Nancy Blake (age 6). Nancy is the widow of Simon Blake, who died in 1849. All these Blake children are hers.

The adjacent household also has some Blakes, all persons born in Pennsylvania:

Mary "Polly" (Unknown) Blake died August, 1876, in Pennsylvania, at age 90.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on October 26, 1850 shows Samuel Blake (age 40) born in Pennsylvania is a Spinner living in Allegheny Twp., Blair Co., PA. Living with him is Margaret Blake (age 34) born in Pennsylvania. Others in the household, all born in Pennsylvania, are: Emily Blake (age 23); Sarah Blake (age 17); Harriet A. Blake (age 12); Josephine Blake (age 9); Wilber B. Blake (age 7); Bascom Blake (age 5); Samuel B. Blake (age 3); and Charles E. Blake (age 6/12).

 

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on June 9, 1860 shows Sam'l. Blake (age 50) born in Pennsylvania with personal estate worth $150 is a Car Builder living in North Ward, City of Altoona, Blair Co., PA. Living with him is Margaret Blake (age 44) born in Pennsylvania. Others in the household, all born in Pennsylvania, are: Weler B. Blake (age 17) a Car Builder's Apprentice; Bascom Blake (age 15); Sam'l. Blake (age 13); Charles E. Blake (age 6/12); and Howard Blake (age 4).

 

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 17, 1870 shows Bascom Blake (age 24) born in Pennsylvania with real estate worth $1,200 is a Carpenter living in the 4th Ward, City of Altoona, Blair Co., PA. Living with him is his Jennie Blake (age 24) born in Pennsylvania, who is Keeping House. Also living there are children, all born in Pennsylvania: Harry Blake (age 3); and William Blake (age 1).

 

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 8, 1880 shows Baskom M. Blake (age 35) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents is a Carpenter living at 1302 5th Avenue, City of Altoona, Blair Co., PA. Living with him is his wife Margaret J. Blake (age 33) born in Pennsylvania to Ireland and Pennsylvania-born parents, who is Keeping House. Also living there are their children, all born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents: Harry Blake (age 12); William Blake (age 10); Jennie Blake (age 9); Ellie Blake (age 7); Baskom Blake (age 5); and Samuel Blake (age 3).


James Blake and (9) Ann………………….

There has been found no record for the birth date of James Blake other than the 1830 Federal Census of Woodbury township, Bedford Co., PA. He and his third wife, Polly, appear to be living in the home of his son Burdine and at that time he was between 70 and 80 years of age. His will was probated in Bedford County Aug. 28, 1845. Place of burial is not known. No dates at all are known for Ann (9) except that the 1820 Census for Woodberry Twp., Huntingdon Co. places her in the age group 26-45. Her maiden name is not known but inasmuch as her first child was named Burdine (4), which is most unusual as a given name, it is believed that it might also be her family name. Ann died prior to 1834 when James wrote his will in which he names his wife, Polly.

James Blake appears in the 1790 Federal Census as a resident of Rapho Twp., Lancaster Co., PA. This township at that time lay along the northern boundary of the county and included the first low range of mountains of the Appalachian chain. Tax records list James Blake as a "founderer" which was an important and skilled job in the iron furnaces which dotted South Mountain from Berks County to the Maryland border. A high grade of iron ore was mined in this area from earliest days to the present time. As mines developed we find the "iron master" taking his skilled workers from place to place, so a study of the movement of the Blake family follows along the line of furnaces from the Mt. Hope Furnace Lancaster Co., where his record first appears, to the furnace in Drumore township near the Susquehanna river, thence to Maryland a back again to Pennsylvania in Franklin, Huntingdon and Blair Counties.

James and his first wife, Sarah (maiden name unknown), had five children according to the family record: Elizabeth, Thomas, James, Henry, Simon. There appears in the Salem Lutheran Church record of Lebanon, PA, the baptism of an Isaac Blakes on Nov. 30, 1798 whose parents were James Blakes and wife. No further record of this child has been found, neither do we find a census record for James for the year 1800 so it may be assumed that wife and child may have died and that he was living with his five children with relatives in Pennsylvania or Maryland. He must have remarried shortly after Sarah's death for Ann is the mother of Burdine who was born Jan. 13, 1800. Another child of this marriage, Maria, died in 1804.

The census of 1810 finds James Blake in Drumore Township. In 1815 he buys land from George Withers, iron master, for a consideration of $4,208.00, sells some of it in 1823 as a resident of Woodbury Twp., Bedford Co., but he is listed as a non‑resident taxpayer in Drumore Twp., from 1816 to 1828. During this period he was probably working in the furnaces of Huntingdon Co. for we find him and his son, James in Woodbury township of that county for the 1820 census. These two Woodbury townships should not be confused with each other; Woodbury of Huntingdon Co., and North Woodbury of Bedford are now in Blair Co.

Deeds and Orphans Court Records show that James and his sons James, Simon and Burdine with their families were living in Blair County in the vicinity of Martinsburg by 1830. James's will provided that his wife, Polly, was to receive yearly rental or full possession of lot and two houses in Martinsburg as long as she remained a widow. At her death or marriage said property was to be sold and proceeds to be divided equally between "my three sons: James, Simon, and Burdine. Eldest son, James, to have farm on which I now reside, about 70 acres, also desk. Burdine to have 20 acres of woodland adjoining and lying between his other land and that of son Simon Blake, also silver watch. Son Henry Blake now of Kentucky to receive $1,000.00 to be paid him by Simon in consequence of farm sold to him by me, $150.00 annually until the whole is paid. Grand­son John Righart $100.00 to be paid by Simon one year after date. Grandchild Ann Blake daughter of son Thomas $50.00; grandchild Sarah Blake daughter of Thomas Blake $75.00 also my bureau." This will was probated Aug. 28, 1845. Polly died in August, 1876 at the age of 80.

The children of James and Sarah Blake were:

Elizabeth b. May 11, 1789 Mar. _______ Righart

Thomas b. Feb. 29, 1792; d. 1830 Mar. 1) Polly Mosier 2) Ann Morrison. Burdine was the executor of his will which is recorded in Washington Co., Md.

James b. Jan. 1793; d. 1859 Mar. Sarah

Henry b. Feb. 26, 1795

Simon b. Nov. 29, 1796; d. 1849 Mar. 1) Jane Wade May 28, 1816-; 2) Nancy

 

The children of James and Ann Blake:

Burdine (4)

Maria d. 1804

 

(16)          . . . . Blake and . . . (17 ).

 

The immediate ancestors of James Blake have not been identified. They were of English descent and family tradition has it that they descended from the family to which Admiral Blake belonged. Admiral Robert Blake was a naval hero under Oliver Cromwell. There is also the story that an ancestor, was attached to the court of Queen Caroline. Another story is that there is a Blake window in Winchester Cathedral. More recent and positive evidence is the recollection of Viola and Ida Blake of an English lawyer visiting in their home when they were children who was looking for a Blake descendant to return to England to participate in the settlement of an estate. Their father, Simon (2) was not interested. The West Virginia branch of the family have the story that several brothers came to this country before the Revolution to evangelize for the Methodists. This is credible as there is a strong religious bent in many of the lines ‑ almost to the point of fanaticism. Ministers, missionaries and devoted church workers are found in each generation. In general the family has been affiliated with the Methodist Church.

 

Blake families were found early in the settlement of America, notably in Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts and in the south - states of Virginia, Maryland and the Carolinas. Descendants of widely separated lines located on the Eastern Shore and Western Shore of Maryland, and today the name is common in the Baltimore area. The ancestry of the Rev. Dr. Eugene Carson Blake leads back to this area and the family claims descent from both William Blake, the poet, and the admiral's family (Admiral Blake himself was not married). Further search on the family might be made in Ireland as one branch was settled there on extensive estates during the time of Prince John in the twelfth century. It is possible that Robert Coleman, the iron master of Pennsylvania who came from Ireland brought the family over to this country, as they seemed to be skilled iron workers.

 

One county history in Maryland states that the James Blake family was of German origin which is incorrect. They may have settled among the Germans there and intermarried with them. Research indicates that James Blake if his father was not an immigrant, belonged to a Virginia or Maryland family.

 

(18)  ……… . Burdine and . . .(19 ).  

 

If Ann's maiden name was Burdine the geographical distribution of families of that name in 1790 was the same as that of Blake. There were a number in Virginia at that time. Variations in spelling of this name  are Burden, Berdine, Beardin, Berden, etc.

 


 

 

The Time line is questionable.

Sir William Blake>(I believe there is a missing family member here)>William Blake d. circa 1834>He had six sons; Thomas, William, Berdine/Burdine, (who also became a preacher) Simon, Easton and Samuel

My great grandfather on my Father's side, instead of coming from Holland, was from England. His name was William Blake and he was the son of Sir William Blake, who once was a great warrior and played an important part in saving
England from Invaders who might have conquered England but for the good generalship of Sir William Blake. he and his armies kept the country from being overrun by invaders, and he was rewarded by the Crown of England with a gift of a great amount of land, of which most of it lay where the city of London now stands. Sir William had two sons; William and Bascm. His son William was a minister, but he didn't like the ways of the Church of England and decided to come to the New Land and start a church to suit his way of thinking. He and his brother left England and came to the New Country about 1700. William settled in Massachusetts, while Bascom settled at Philadelphia.

William started a church in Massachusetts called the Quaker Church, of which there are several branches today; The dunkards, Mennonites, and others.
William had learned all about the foundry business in England, so he decided to start a cast iron foundry in this country. He and a friend left Massachusetts and came to Pennsylvania and settled at what is now Woodbury, Bedford County, and there started a cast iron foundry, making stoves, iron kettles, ploughshares, and all kinds of cast iron implements that were needed in those early days. He continued preaching and helping to run the iron foundry until his death, about he year 1834. He had six sons; Thonas, William, Berdine/Burdine, (who also became a preacher) Simon, Easton and Samuel; who was my Father. Five of these boys enlisted in the army during the Civil war and were mustered in at the place now called Loysburg, Bedford County, but at that time was the town of Pattonsville. Thomas and William never returned from the war. Whether they were killed in action, or what happened to them, no one ever knew. Easton had learned the foundry business in his Father's foundry, and on coming back from the war, decided to start a Foundry in Huntingdon. He built his foundry on the east bank, about 200 yards about the mouth of Stone Creek, which empties into the Juniata River. The foundry continued to run and turn out castings until Easton Blake's death, about the year 1888. when it was shut down, and some years later it was disbanded.

My father, Samuel Blake, was a plasterer by trade. He married Mary Putt at Martinsburg about the year 1864 after he had come home from the Civil War. They had nine children; six boys and three girls.

There was Frank, Oliver, (myself -- Miles), Simon, Charles, Samuel, Savilla, Margaret and Elizabeth. Of the six boys only two had children. The elder one, Frank, had two girls, no boys; and myself, Miles, five girls and one
boy, Ralph, who is married to Arvilla Frederick. My son has no children, so you see, of the William Blake that migrated from England, Ralph Blake is the last of his descendants in this line.
Written by:
Miles M. Blake
549 Wharton Ave. Lakemont
Altoona PA




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http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=beschuck&id=I8481http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=beschuck&id=I6686
ID: I6686
Name: Simon S Blake
Surname: Blake
Given Name: Simon S
Sex: M
Birth: 29 Oct 1829 in Martinsburg, Blair, Pennsylvania 1
Death: 5 Mar 1904 in Richland Center, Richland, Wisconsin 1
Burial: Oak Ridge Cemetery, Orion, Richland, Wisconsin 2
_UID: EE374B01AE2B3B40A97704E78C3A1501ACFC 3
Change Date: 15 Sep 2004 at 15:58:47

Marriage 1 Mary Magdalena Ambrose b: 30 Apr 1836 in Ligonier, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania
Married: 18 Jan 1855 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin 4Children
Sylvester Fremont Blake b: 10 Jul 1856 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Ida Elmira Blake b: 17 Sep 1858 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Viola Genoa Blake b: 14 Apr 1861 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Mary Estelle Blake b: 14 May 1863 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Salome Caroline Blake b: 28 Jul 1865 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
John Ambrose Blake b: ABT 1865 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Cora Jane Blake b: 30 Oct 1869 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Grant Burdine Blake b: ABT 1871 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Dora Belle Blake b: 22 Jan 1873 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Edna Pearl Blake b: 5 Sep 1876 in Orion, Richland, Wisconsin
Sources:
Title: The Blake-Ambrose Family History
Author: Irma Ruth Mason Anderson
Note:
(Mrs. Arvid E. Anderson) 144 Kenneth St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060, January 1966
Page: P 3, 54
Date: Jul 2000
Title: The Blake-Ambrose Family History
Author: Irma Ruth Mason Anderson
Note:
(Mrs. Arvid E. Anderson) 144 Kenneth St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060, January 1966
Page: p 3, 54
Date: Jul 2000
Title: The Blake-Ambrose Family History
Author: Irma Ruth Mason Anderson
Note:
(Mrs. Arvid E. Anderson) 144 Kenneth St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060, January 1966
Page: pg 3
Note: Original sources used by Irma Ruth for this family are: (1) "History of Crawford & Richland Counties, Wisconsin", Union Pub. Co., Springfield, Ill., 1884 pp. 917, 918, 1131, 1132, 1143; (2) civil War service and disability pension record. General Service Administration, National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Text: As a youth Simon's experiences were many and varied. Until he was fourteen he was in school or helped his father on the farm. Then he tried his hand at learning the trades of merchant tailor, blacksmith and axmaking, but finally engaged in teaching. When he was seventeen he tried to enlist in the service of the U.S. for the Mexican War. As he was underaged and his parents withheld their consent, he returned to axmaking until he was 21. In the fall of 1852 he visited relatives in Ironton, Ohio then went on to Arkansas where he worked in the lumbering business for seven months. Returning to Pennsylvania he taught school for a four-month winter term.
It is not certain that Simon's brothers, Thomas and Charles, accompanied him to Richland County, Wisconsin when he went there to take up land in 1854, but it was not long before them, as well as his sisters' families - The Brennemans and Hamiltons - joined him. Land at $1.25 an acre enticed many from the east to settle in this part of the frontier. At this time the Ambroses arrived from Indiana. The land was still virgin forest so these first settlers established their homes in the same fashion their fathers ha made homes in the forests of Pennsylvania by clearing the land, building log cabins and planting crops.
Simon entered 120 acres of land on Sections 17 and 18 of the town of Orion then went to work in the village as a clerk in a store. Quite possibly it was there he met Mary Ambrose now a girl of nineteen, and he lost no time in proposing. They were married the following January. He left the store in the fall and taught a 3-month term of school at Pleasant Hill in the town of Eagle. The next spring they settled on his land on Oak Ridge and continued to live there until their latter years when they moved to the town of Richland Center.
They had three small children - Sylvester, Ida and Viola when Simon responded to the call of Abraham Lincoln and enlisted in the 25th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry for a term of three years. He was wounded at Decatur, Georgia in July 1864 on Sherman's march to the sea. He used to tell his children how the ladies from the plantation mansion brought him food and water until he was taken from the battle field to the field hospital. As his wound was serious he was sent from there to the Harvey General Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin and remained there until he received a disability discharge on March 20, 1865.
Simon Blake was interested in public affairs and held several town offices. In politics he was a Republican, and Viola would often be his companion in attending political rallies. He was deeply religious and helped to establish the Methodist church at Oak Ridge. This log church is no longer in existence but nearby in the cemetery Simon and Mary Ambrose Blake lie buried.
Mary Magdalena Ambrose was nine years old when her parents moved from the old homestead near Ligonier, Pennsylvania to Clinton County, Indiana. They settled on land near Fussiaville and remained there until 1854 when they migrated with their relatives, the Kanables, to Wisconsin.
Mary is remembered as a quiet, unassuming person busy with the cares of raising a family of ten children two of whom died in infancy. She seldom attended church as she was usually preparing dinner for the preacher who still had one, perhaps two, appointments yet to make. Their home was not a home fo plenty, bu they were hospitable and willing to share - a characteristic of most frontier people.
Date: Aug 2000
Title: The Blake-Ambrose Family History
Author: Irma Ruth Mason Anderson
Note:
(Mrs. Arvid E. Anderson) 144 Kenneth St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060, January 1966
Page: p 3
Date: Jul 2000
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Burdine Blake + Mazie Ann Simpkins d/o William and Ruth (Wallen/Walling, the daughter of Colonel James WALLING and Mary MALLOT WALLING) Simpkins>Simon Blake + Mary Magdalena Ambrose
I am not related, just sharing.
http://genforum.genealogy.com/simpkins/messages/354.html

Simpkins in Washington Co. MD 1790-1830
Posted by: Patty Simpkins Cartwright Date: June 02, 2000 at 20:09:48
of 1012

I am looking for material on William and Ruth Wallen/Walling SIMPKINS she was the daughter of Colonel James WALLING and Mary MALLOT WALLING..
Ruth and William SIMPKINS married 20 March 1780 Washington Co. MD listed on the 1790 Washington Co. MD. Ruth was born c1763 Frederick, Co. MD. William was born c1757.
I am trying to find how this SIMPKINS tree ties on to my family in Kentucky/West Virginia.

Can anyone tell me the names of their children, etc. Parents/brother/sisters to William Simpkins ? Did they have a son Charles?
Ruth Walling was a cousin to my James Walling [ Walden-Walling-Wallen] 1840-1850 Estill Co. Kentucky. This James was married to Rutha McCUBBINS Walling. My 4th G-GParents, they were in TN 1830.

Thankyou,
Patty
Patsc3@aol.com

Re: Wm. SIMPKINS of MD b. c. 1755-1757
Posted by: Ron Cofiell Date: July 12, 2000 at 18:29:04
In Reply to: Simpkins in Washington Co. MD 1790-1830 by Patty Simpkins Cartwright of 1012

William SIMPKINS may have been born c. 1755, and he d. 1831. He was son of John and Mary (GORSUCH) SIMPKINS. John was b. 3/19/1721/22 in Baltimore Co., MD and d. 1772 in Loudoun Co., VA. John was still in Balto. Co. in Feb. 1767 when he gave his age as 45 in a deposition (Balto. Co. Land Records, Liber B #P, folio 418). John was son of John and Priscilla SIMPKINS; Mary was daughter of Thomas and Jane (ENSOR) GORSUCH. Wm.'s siblings were John (b. 12/25/1746), Susannah (b. 2/2/1748), Priscilla (b. 12/29/1750), and possibly Rachel (m. ___KELLY).

Re: Wm. SIMPKINS of MD b. c. 1755-1757
Posted by: Patty Simpkins Cartwright Date: March 09, 2001 at 18:34:39
In Reply to: Re: Wm. SIMPKINS of MD b. c. 1755-1757 by Ron Cofiell of 1012

Dear Ron,

Can you share more on William Simpkins' brothers and sisters on who they married and where they lived?

William Simpkins born 1757 md, 1780 Washington Co. Maryland to Ruth WALLEN/ WALLING she was born in Fredrick Co. MD 1763.
They went to Washington Co. MD.

I don't have anything more on William's siblings: John born 1746, Susannah b 1748, Priscilla 1750 and maybe Rachel.

I am still working on where William and Ruth's children lived and who they married.
I have only what is on the Simpkins Family Gen. Forum.. which is very helpful, just need to try to put it all together.

I do appreciate all the help you and others have given me.
Thankyou,
Patty
Patsc3@aol.com

Re: Wm. SIMPKINS of MD b. c. 1755-1757
Posted by: Jim jbennett@execpc.comDate: June 10, 2001 at 15:16:34
In Reply to: Re: Wm. SIMPKINS of MD b. c. 1755-1757 by Patty Simpkins Cartwright of 1012

Patty,
William and Ruth Simpkins had a daughter,
*******Mazie Ann born February 1794 in Washington
Co, MD. She married *******Burdine Blake and moved
to *****Blair Co, PA. William and Ruth are my
gggg-grandparents.
##############
http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?burdine,blake::simpkins::367.html
Re: Wm. SIMPKINS of MD b. c. 1755-1757
Posted by: Ron Cofiell Date: July 14, 2000 at 01:15:12
In Reply to: Re: Wm. SIMPKINS of MD b. c. 1755-1757 by Patty Simpkins Cartwright of 1012

I don't have anything more on SIMPKINS in VA or KY. I would like to find out about Wm. SIMPKINS' father, John, who died in Loudoun Co., VA in 1772. (The citations are VA Wills and Administrations, p. 386; and VA Historical Mag., v. 26, p. 217, neither of which I have seen.) For instance, when did he move there from MD? Was his wife Mary (nee GORSUCH) still alive at that time? Did he travel to VA in a caravan with other families from Balto. Co.?

****Wm.'s daughter Mazey Ann (1794-1867) m. Burdine BLAKE in 1818 in Washington Co., MD. According to Mrs. A.E. ANDERSON (probably Irma Ruth Mason ANDERSON, c. 1981), the other children of Wm. and Ruth (WALLING) SIMPKINS were Thomas, John W., Sarah Guyton, Ruth A., Mary Woltz, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Darius (m. Rowena KADLE), and Nancy Spencer. I do not see a Charles listed

 

 

 

 

 

The Shoup and Putt family history shared
by Jan Putt Neville.

Re-typed for Shoup and Putt family by Jane Curci

This is 1954 and is the hundredth year of the borough of Saxton, in the community of the once thriving place where I was born in the year of 1872.
I am now in my 81st year. Miles M. Blake

See Faust and Brumbaugh's Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the 18th Century to
The American Colonies.
Sebastian and Elspeth had issue:
Elizabeth bapt 1734;
Hans Heinrich bapt 1735; (Could this be our Sarah (Shoup) Putt's father,
Henry?)
Anna bapt 1739 Sissach;
Sebastian (see above) who m Margit Teegard[en] and who d 1792-1793 Saxton,
Bedford Co PA + Fockler's Cemetery; and maybe others.
===================================
The brief history that Janet Putt Neville shared with us confirms that the author born in 1872 (119 years ago, approximately 100 years after Sarah was born) names Sarah as the wife of Henry Putt.

This is 1954 and is the hundredth year of the borough of Saxton, in the community of the once thriving place where I was born in the year of 1872.
I am now in my 81st year. Miles M. Blake
Also LDS records show that Sarah Shoup married Henry Putt.
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/frameset_search.asp
Sarah SHOUP
Sex: F Event(s):
Misc: Abt. 1765
Bedford, Pennsylvania Parents:
Father: Henry SHOUP
Mother: Mrs. Henry SHOUP
=====================================
A HISTORY….

of the rise and fall of a little community that was located, partly in Huntingdon County and partly in Bedford County, along the upper Juniata River, known as the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River.

In order to introduce this history, we will have to go back to about the Year 1730. At this time there lived a family in Holland by the name of Shoup, and they had a son named Henry. This family was very poor, as they made a
living by farming, and it was pretty tough going to eke out a living, as their Farms were very small. Henry, being grown to manhood and not seeing much chance of getting ahead in his native country, had heard of the new land of America and decided to try his luck there. He had also heard that a man by the name of Penn had a large grant of land, called Penn's Woods or Pennsylvania, and that he had sent out word that anyone who wanted to come and settle on this land, was welcome to take up land without any charge.

Young Henry was looking for adventure and a place to settle to start a life of his own. He married the girl of his choice and they started on their honeymoon for America to find a home in Pennsylvania that they had heard so much about. After several weeks on the water they landed at Philadelphia, and looking around, found that about all the land close around there had been taken up. They bought a camping outfit and started for the Susquehanna River, and finally came to where the Juniata empties into the Susquehanna.
They got a canoe and started to navigate the Juniata, and they pushed their way upstream, catching fish and shooting game to eke out their meals. They finally came to the South Branch of the Juniata, now called the Raystown Branch. Here they pushed their way up stream, where they found the fine fishing--catching many large salmon, pike and other fish, with plenty of wild game in the forests close along the stream. They made their way on upstream to where a small stream emptied into the Raystown Branch, so they
stopped there to look around, and they came to the conclusion that here would be an ideal spot to settle down. There seemed to be plenty of rich land; the stream was alive with several species of fish; and in the forests there was an abundance of wild game. This was an important factor, as they would practically have to live on fish and game, along with a few berries and wild fruits, until they would get their ground ready to plant. They soon found a likely looking spot not far from the stream (which was later called Shoup's Run) with plenty of good pure drinking water, and here decided to build their future home.

First, they would build a rough cabin to live in, until they could build a better house. For many weeks and months they were very busy and happy, building their cabin; cutting the logs and dragging them by hand to the site
of the cabin. They didn't have a horse, or yet even an ox, which was mostly used for that kind of work, and also for cultivating the new soil after it was cleared. After a lot of hard work, and not much pleasure, they finally had a rough cabin built. They were very proud and satisfied, and happy that now they had made a start in a life of happiness and contentment.

In the meantime they had heard of a settlement on the West side of the Mountain, which is now called Tussey Mountain. The South Branch of the Juniata River runs along close to the foot of the Tussey Mountain. Mr. Shoup decided to cross the Tussey Mountain into what is now called Morrison's
Cove, and see if he could buy a horse or a yoke of oxen. His wife was to go with him, as he refused to let her alone at the cabin while he was gone. One morning they started to walk across the Tussey Mt. at a point now known as
Raver's Gap. (The Raver's Gap Road crosses the Tussey Mt. about three miles Southwest of Saxton and comes out at Woodbury in Morrison's Cove.) At that time there were bands of roving Indians in this part of Pennsylvania.
Although they had been driven west of the Allegheny Mts., they often came back across the mountains in small bands to make raids on the farmers' stock; sometimes to kill some of the settlers and rob them of whatever valuables they had, then escape back across the mountains. Mr. Shoup, knowing there might be Indians hiding in the mountain, made sure to take his rifle and plenty of ammunition with him. He and his wife traveled all day and got to Woodbury late that night without seeing any Indians, however. They stayed
that night in Woodbury and the next day started out to buy a horse or yoke of oxen. After doing a lot of traveling and inquiring, they finally purchased a yoke of oxen that a man had brought from Maryland and drove the oxen back to
Woodbury.

At that time Woodbury was about the only Trading Post in this part of the state where you could buy produce and farming implements....


(I BELEIVE THE FOLLOWING PART TO BE GENERAL HISTORY)...

CONTINUED BOTTOM OF PAGE 7

Mr. and Mrs. Shoup kept working hard to make themselves a home, and seemed to be happy and satisfied with what they accomplished, although they always had to be on the alert on account of the Indians, who often made raids from west
of the Alleghenies. There were quite a few other settlers scattered along the east side of the Tussey Mountain in what is now called Woodcock Valley, and along the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River. Mr. Shoup visited these
settlers and discussed the necessity of building a Fort in order to have a place to protect themselves in case the Indians made a raid in this section.

All the settlers agreed that it was a good idea and they set a day to hold a meeting at the home of Mr. Shoup to discuss ways and means, and a site on which to build the Fort. The meeting took place and all agreed to build a
log Fort on a piece of land not far from Mr. Shoup's cabin. This site was on part of the land on which Mr. Shoup had settled and started to improve, and was situated about one-fourth mile, north west of Mr. Shoup's cabin along a slight raise of ground, about two hundred yards from the east bank of the River. There was a spring of water just at the bottom of this raise, which was most important, on account of having drinking water within the Fort in case of a siege. This Fort was almost directly north, about two hundred feet from the Borough line of what is now Saxton. The new road that leads out of the Borough to the north, runs almost directly through the center of what was the stockade of the old Shoup Fort.

In building the Fort, the settlers took turns cutting logs and hauling them to the site of the Fort. .....Etc.

About the last Indian raid that was made in this valley was about the year 1785. This was when Captain Phillips, with seven or eight of his scouts had come across the Tussey Mountain from the Cove at a point near where the State Road leading from Fredericksburg, intersects with the Woodcock Valley Road..... etc.

The Shoup's had several children by this time; the first a girl, and they named her Sarah; then two boys, Henry and John.

In Holland, Mr. Shoup's family had neighbors by the name of Putt, who also had a son named Henry. Young Henry had often heard his parents talk of the Shoup's who had gone to America, so he planned that when he grew up and had saved enough money to make the trip, that he would go to America also. When he was in his early twenties, he left for the new country, found his way to the Juniata Valley and the home of Mr. Shoup, and went to work on his farm. Eventually he married Mr. Shoup's daughter, Sarah. Mr. Shoup gave them a piece of his land along Shoup's Run on which to build their home.

Henry Putt was mechanically minded and knew a great deal about milling, as his father in Holland had owned a Grist Mill and was a Millwright. This new settlement was badly in need of a Mill to grind their grain, which they found would grow very easily in this country. Young Putt picked a spot along the stream where he thought would be a good location to build a Mill, and where he could turn the water form the stream into the Mill with the least amount of work; also with the least danger of the Mill being washed out in time of floods. The spot that he chose was at a point about one hundred feet east of the bridge that spans the stream and is crossed by the highway that leads from the Borough of Saxton through Puttstown (which was named for Mr. Putt) and on into Coalmont, Dudley, Broadtop City and over the Broadtop Mt.
Incidentally, the new road passes directly over the spot where the old mill used to stand.

Mr. Putt built a dam about three hundred feet up stream from the site of the Mill. Then a trench or millrace was dug to carry the water from the dam to the Mill. He then built what they called a head gate.

Etc....... I have skipped several pages

Henry Putt became the father of seven boys, whose names were: Henry Putt II, Michael, Abel, Jacob, Jonathon, Abraham and William. (William Putt was the writer's Grandfather.)

Mr. Putt built up a great trade in the milling business, and he had to find an outlet for the sale of his flour and feed, as there weren't enough people in the vicinity at that time to consume his surplus. He conceived the idea
of shipping his surplus flour to Baltimore, which by that time was becoming a good market. But, to get his flour to Baltimore, which by that time was becoming a good market.

Etc..........I skipped several pages

Mr. Putt and his sons kept on in the milling business, and every spring they would make a grip to Baltimore with an ark load of flour. I heard my Grandfather, William Putt, tell about one trip in particular that they made to Baltimore. He said that when they got to Harrisburg, where the Juniata empties into the Susquehanna, and where they always camped for the night, they tied up close to the point where the two rivers come together, and they
were getting ready for their evening meal, when a funny thing happened.
There was another party of men bringing an ark load of flour down the Susquehanna, and they had tied up on the opposite side of the point of land between the two rivers. One of the Putt boys, Abraham, by name, was a powerful, big man, weighing around three hundred pounds, and had arms as
Large as a six inch stove pipe. He was the largest of the seven brothers, but was the biggest coward of them all. As he was getting ready for supper, and was rolling up his sleeves to wash his arms and hands, he happened to glance
toward the point of land that lay between the two rivers, He saw the whole gang of men that belonged to the crew of the other boat, coming full tilt toward the Putt gang, but when they saw this mountain of a man rolling up his sleeves, they thought he was getting read to meet them, and they didn't like the looks of the big arms, so they backed out and ran. So the biggest and the most cowardly of the Putt clan scared the entire Susquehanna crew, and he
didn't even know at the time what it was all about, but the Putt boys were never bothered after that.

The Putts kept on in the milling business, but branched out into wagon making. The first wagon they made was called the tar skein wagon, because they used pine tar to grease or lubricate the wooden skein or spindle....

Etc....I am skipping several pages ….

This particular section of the Juniata Valley grew to be quite a settlement by 1800. The little village on Shoup's Run Branch of the Juniata had become quite large, and could boast of a Grist Mill, Saw Mill, Cider mill, Cooper's Shop, Wagon-making Shop, Saddler's Shop and later on, about 1850, one of Henry Putt's sons built another Grist Mill about one mile west of the old Grist Mill. This mill stood about exactly on the spot where now stands the Pennsylvania Electric Plant. This mill was run for several years and then burnt down--never to be rebuilt. Shortly after that, another Mill was built about one-half mile southwest of the one that burnt, and was owned and operated by a man by the name of Isaac Little; and this Mill continued to operate until the present time. It was one of the first mills to be changed from the old type Burr Mill to the new roller type of mill.

Etc...Several pages skipped....

The branch road that was built to Dudley and other points southeast of Dudley was named the Shoup's Run Branch of the Huntingdon and Broadtop Railroad, in honor of Mr. Henry Shoup who first settled the little community of Puttstown.
....

Etc....Several pages skipped....

And now, coming to a conclusion of this short history of all these happenings in connection with this community, I, the writer, would like to explain a little more of my family history. As I have explained before, my great-grandfather on my Mother's side was Henry Shoup, who settled the little community of Puttstown and Saxton. They, too, have nearly all disappeared out of the picture.
#####
My great grandfather on my Father's side, instead of coming from Holland, was from England. His name was William Blake and he was the son of Sir William Blake, who once was a great warrior and played an important part in saving
England from Invaders who might have conquered England but for the good generalship of Sir William Blake. he and his armies kept the country from being overrun by invaders, and he was rewarded by the Crown of England with a gift of a great amount of land, of which most of it lay where the city of London now stands. Sir William had two sons; William and Bascm. His son William was a minister, but he didn't like the ways of the Church of England and decided to come to the New Land and start a church to suit his way of thinking. He and his brother left England and came to the New Country about 1700. William settled in Massachusetts, while Bascom settled at Philadelphia.

William started a church in Massachusetts called the Quaker Church, of which there are several branches today; The dunkards, Mennonites, and others.
William had learned all about the foundry business in England, so he decided to start a cast iron foundry in this country. He and a friend left Massachusetts and came to Pennsylvania and settled at what is now Woodbury, Bedford County, and there started a cast iron foundry, making stoves, iron kettles, ploughshares, and all kinds of cast iron implements that were needed in those early days. He continued preaching and helping to run the iron foundry until his death, about he year 1834. He had six sons; Thomas, William, Berdine, (who also became a preacher) Simon, Easton and Samuel; who was my Father. Five of these boys enlisted in the army during the Civil war and were mustered in at the place now called Loysburg, Bedford County, but at that time was the town of Pattonsville. Thomas and William never returned from the war. Whether they were killed in action, or what happened to them, no one ever knew. Easton had learned the foundry business in his Father's foundry, and on coming back from the war, decided to start a Foundry in Huntingdon. He built his foundry on the east bank, about 200 yards about the mouth of Stone Creek, which empties into the Juniata River. The foundry continued to run and turn out castings until Easton Blake's death, about the year 1888. when it was shut down, and some years later it was disbanded.

My father, Samuel Blake, was a plasterer by trade. He married Mary Putt at Martinsburg about the year 1864 after he had come home from the Civil War. They had nine children; six boys and three girls.

There was Frank, Oliver, (myself -- Miles), Simon, Charles, Samuel, Savilla, Margaret and Elizabeth. Of the six boys only two had children. The elder one, Frank, had two girls, no boys; and myself, Miles, five girls and one
boy, Ralph, who is married to Arvilla Frederick. My son has no children, so you see, of the William Blake that migrated from England, Ralph Blake is the last of his descendants in this line.

There is supposedly a great fortune lying in the Bank of England form the sale of the property that was given to Sir William Blake for helping to save the Crown of England. This fortune is supposed to be as much as thirty-million dollars or more, and is laying there waiting for the Blake heirs to claim it, but up to the present time, no one has been aggressive enough to lay claim to it.

This ends my story of the rise and fall of a once thriving and prosperous community in the upper Juniata Valley. This is 1954 and is the hundredth year of the borough of Saxton, in the community of the once thriving place where I was born in the year of 1872. I am now in my 81st year.

--The End----
Written by:
Miles M. Blake
549 Wharton Ave. Lakemont
Altoona PA
=============
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

* Sebastian Schaub, lace-maker, Hans Heinrich Schaub, his father, a widower.

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

Elsbeth Tschudin, his wife. Their children: Elisabeth, bapt. Jan. 5, 1734,
Hans Heinrich, Oct. 23, 1735. The birth of another daughter Anna, bapt. May
7, 1739, proves that they did not go.*

proves that they did not go.*

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

Martin Tschudi, lace-maker.

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

Rosina Schaffner from Tenniken, his wife.

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

Their children:

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

1. Barbara, bapt...............................Oct. 26, 1732

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

2. Anna, bapt. March 18, 1736

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

3. Elisabeth, bapt. Dec. 8, 1737

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies
Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

Expects to have about 100 pounds left.

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Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies:
Volume 2
ZÜRICH TO CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1744
INTRODUCTION
THE CANTON OF BASEL AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS INHABITANTS IN THE COUNTRY
DISTRICTS

Tenniken
 

 

 

 

 

Jane, Carole--
In the year 1982, Leda (Blake) Brennan submitted the history that Miles Blake had written to share with Jon Baughman.
I glanced over Jon's reprint of it. It was different in some places and much longer. Jon said it was an original copy that Leda sent him and he had not changed any of it. One of the places that differed was when Miles launched into the history of Henry Putt.
I quote, "In "Switzerland" , Mr. Shoup's family had neighbors by the name of Putt who also had a son by the name of Henry. .....when he was in his early twenties, he left for the country, found his way to the Juniata Valley and the home of Mr. Shoup, and went to work on his farm. Eventually he married Mr. Shoup's daughter Sarah. Mr Shoup gave them a piece of his land along Shoup's Run on which to build their home.
When I related to Jon that there was a conflict about Holland, he said that he probably boarded the ship in Holland because that was where most of them were sent. I then told him about William listing his father as having been born in Germany (on the census record) and Jon said
that sounded plausible because Germany at that time had no name and was not named Germany until sometime during or before or after World War I. He then related that there were three separate places under the sovereignty of Charlemagne's three sons.
I do not understand why the copy I sent you both mentioned
"Holland" on it, yet this copy says "Switzerland". Jon also said that when the influx of immigrants got to be too much for England (those who were leaving for the new country, America,) they were sent to different places to embark on their journey.
I have no doubt that the story told about Henry and Sarah is
true; why would our ancestors just pick Sarah Shoup as his wife? I had not known Leda Brennan was related until I
saw her obituary in the paper where she died and it listed
the Blake's. She gave this story to Jon in 1982. Jon printed the history and gave the credit to Leda for submitting it and the opening credit Leda as having ties to the Shoups and Putts. He had forgotten about this article which was covered in at least 6 issues in a continuing series.

 

 

 

 

From the story written by Shoup/Putt Descendant.

About the last Indian raid that was made in this valley was about the year 1785. This was when Captain Phillips, with seven or eight of his scouts had come across the Tussey Mountain from the Cove at a point near where the State Road leading from Fredericksburg, intersects with the Woodcock Valley Road..... etc.

The Shoup's had several children by this time (1785); the first a girl, and they named her Sarah; then two boys, Henry and John.

Shoup>Sarah; then Henry; John;
Henry Putt+Sarah Shoup>Henry Putt II, Michael, Abel, Jacob, Jonathon, Abraham and William~(William Putt was the writer's Grandfather)>Mary + Samuel Blake

In Holland, Mr. Shoup's family had neighbors by the name of Putt, who also had a son named Henry. Young Henry had often heard his parents talk of the Shoup's who had gone to America, so he planned that when he grew up and had saved enough money to make the trip, that he would go to America also. When he was in his early twenties, he left for the new country, found his way to the Juniata Valley and the home of Mr. Shoup, and went to work on his farm.

Henry Putt became the father of seven boys, whose names were: Henry Putt II, Michael, Abel, Jacob, Jonathon, Abraham and William. (William Putt was the writer's Grandfather.)

Mary Putt Blake is William's daughter.

[There was Frank, Oliver, (myself -- Miles), Simon, Charles, Samuel, Savilla, Margaret and Elizabeth. Of the six boys only two had children. The elder one, Frank, had two girls, no boys; and myself, Miles, five girls and one
boy, Ralph, who is married to Arvilla Frederick. My son has no children, so you see, of the William Blake that migrated from England, Ralph Blake is the last of his descendants in this line.]

Household Record 1880 United States Census
Samuel BLAKE Self M Male W 40 PA Works On R.R. PA PA
****Mary A. BLAKE Wife M Female W 34 PA Keeping House PA PA
Franklin BLAKE Son S Male W 15 PA Laborer PA PA
Oliver BLAKE Son S Male W 13 PA Laborer PA PA
Margaret A. BLAKE Dau S Female W 10 PA PA PA
Miles M. BLAKE Son S Male W 7 PA PA PA
Simon BLAKE Son S Male W 4 PA PA PA
Simon BLAKE Brother S Male W 50 PA Works On R.R. PA PA

Source Information:
Census Place Hopewell, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania
Family History Library Film 1255134
NA Film Number T9-1134
Page Number 231D

####
A few doors away is the Abram Putt family (William's son)
Household Record 1880 United States Census
Abram PUTT Self M Male W 34 PA Laborer PA PA
Barbara L. PUTT Wife M Female W 34 PA Keeping House PA PA
Ida J. PUTT Dau S Female W 5 PA PA PA
Iva M. PUTT Dau S Female W 3 PA PA PA

Source Information:
Census Place Hopewell, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania
Family History Library Film 1255134
NA Film Number T9-1134
Page Number 232A
####
Then comes George Putt (William's son)
Household Record 1880 United States Census
George W. PUTT Self M Male W 41 PA Laborer PA PA
Margaret PUTT Wife M Female W 38 PA Keeping House PA PA
Lillie M. PUTT Dau S Female W 10 PA At Home PA PA
James A. PUTT Son S Male W 7 PA PA PA
**** Annette REED Niece S Female W 8 PA PA PA
Source Information:
Census Place Hopewell, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania
Family History Library Film 1255134
NA Film Number T9-1134
Page Number 232A
####
Lives near by but cannot be certain of relationship
Household Record 1880 United States Census
Levi PUTT Self M Male W 53 PA Laborer PA PA
Ann PUTT Wife M Female W 45 MD Keeping House MD MD
Mariah PUTT Dau S Female W 14 PA At Home PA PA
David MAGEE SSon S Male W 13 PA Laborer PA MD
Ida B MAGEE SDau S Female W 15 PA At Home PA MD
Source Information:
Census Place Hopewell, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania
Family History Library Film 1255134
NA Film Number T9-1134
Page Number 231D
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Household Record 1880 United States Census
*****William PUTT Self W Male W 82 PA GER PA
Miles PUTT Son S Male W 44 PA Laborer PA PA
David PUTT Son S Male W 32 PA Laborer PA PA
Silas PUTT Son S Male W 29 PA PA PA
Andrew PUTT Son S Male W 26 PA PA PA
Elizabeth PUTT Dau S Female W 28 PA PA PA
Source Information:
Census Place Hopewell, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania
Family History Library Film 1255134
NA Film Number T9-1134
Page Number 231D
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Altoona Mirror, Altoona, PA, Saturday, July 23, 1904

Bascom Blake, Jr., of this city, while hitching up a horse yesterday afternoon, had his eye blackened. When reaching down in front of the animal to pick up some object, the horse raised up one of his fore feet, its knee striking him in the eye.