Edward Armstrong Jr.




Edward Armstrong Jr. was born before 1773, in British America, and died Unknown, in Township of Grantham, Lincoln Co., District of Niagara, Upper Canada. He is the son of Edward Armstrong Sr. of Unknown, and Catherine "Caty" Unknown, of Unknown.  

Phoebe Mallory??? was born Unknown, and died Unknown, at age Unknown.

Edward Armstrong Jr. and Phoebe Mallory were possibly married about 1802, in Augusta Twp., Leeds Co., Province of Upper Canada.

Edward Armstrong Jr. and Phoebe (Mallory) Armstrong had Unknown children.




TIMELINE


   

All of the children of Edward Armstrong Sr., and most of the children of Thomas Armstrong, Sr., U. E. Loyalists, were eligible to receive a land grant based upon their fathers' loyalty to the King of England. Thomas Armstrong Jr. was Expunged from the U. E. Loyalist List in 1804 - 1805.


http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/maps/index.aspx

ogs.on.ca

https://leedsandgrenville.ogs.on.ca

https://sites.rootsweb.com/~onleedsg/research-census.html


Map of Ontario, Canada, in 1791.


Edward Armstrong Jr. was born before 1773, in British America.


In May, 1799, John H. Armstrong assigns to his beloved brother Edward Armstrong Jr., all of his lands in Elizabethtown Twp., Leeds Co.


   

On September 24, 1784, Edward Armstrong Sr., his wife, and three children were entitled, through a drawing, to three hundred acres of land, in Lot No. 17, 2nd Concession, North.


The November 5, 1787, Land Patent Granted to Edward Armstrong and family for 400 acres of land, 200 acres of which are from a bounty from Lord Dorchester.


The  April 8, 1801, Census for Elizabethtown Twp., Leeds Co., Province of Upper Canada, shows the Oliver Graham Family, consisting of Mary Graham, Oliver Graham Jr., Martin Graham, Mary Graham, Hannah Graham, John Graham, Sarah Graham, William Graham, and Parmelia Fletcher. Living in the Edward Fletcher Jr., family are Rachel Fletcher, and children, John Fletcher, Allen Fletcher, Archibald Fletcher, Archibald Fletcher, and Jane Fletcher.


       

The May 15, 1802, Census for Elizabethtown Twp., Leeds Co., District of Johnstown, Province of Upper Canada, shows Edward Armstrong is living by himself. John Fletcher and Margaret "Maggie" (Armstrong) (Allen) Fletcher, Theodorius Allen and Pamelia Fletcher are living in Family No. 114, Elizabethtown Twp., Leeds Co., Province of Upper Canada. Fletcher children, Allen Fletcher, Archibald Fletcher, and Jane Fletcher are living in Family No. 114. The Oliver Graham Family, consisting of Mary Graham, Oliver Graham Jr., Martin Graham, Mary Graham, Hannah Graham, John Graham, Sarah Graham, William Graham. Alexander Fletcher (adult), Rachel Fletcher (adult), John Fletcher (child), Allin Fletcher (child), Archibald Fletcher (child), and Jane Fletcher (child). Archibald Fletcher (adult lives alone.


           

The 1803 Census for Elizabethtown Twp., Leeds Co., Province of Upper Canada, shows Catherine "Caty" (Adams???) Armstrong is living alone in Family No.158. John Fletcher, his wife, Margaret "Maggie" (Armstrong) (Allen) Fletcher, Adolphus Armstrong, James Armstrong, Theodora Allen, Weston Allen, Susannah Allen, and Parmelia Fletcher, are living in Family No. 205. West Allen, Hannah Allen, and Abel Allen, are living in Family No. 106. Edward Armstrong Jr. and Phebe Armstrong are living in Family No. 97.


   

The 1804 Census for Elizabethtown Twp., Leeds Co., Province of Upper Canada, shows John Fletcher, his wife, Margaret "Maggie" (Armstrong) (Allen) Fletcher, Margaret's mother, Catherine "Caty" (Adams???) Armstrong (misnamed Fletcher), Matthew Allen (misnamed Fletcher), Susannah Armstrong "Sally/Anne" Allen (misnamed Fletcher), and Matthew Allen (misnamed Fletcher), are living in Family No. 205.


           

On June 26, 1807, Edward Armstrong Jr. of Niagara Township, a Blacksmith, signs the Loyalist agreement and requests 200 acres of land.


   

On May 12, 1808, Edward Armstrong Jr. of Niagara Township, a Blacksmith, requests that the name of his late father, Edward Armstrong Sr., be inserted on the U. E. List. The request was Recommended.


Indeed a very large proportion of the land was shut away altogether from the use of actual settlers.

1. There was first the Crown reserves – one-seventh of all the lands; these had a mark on them like a blur made with the end of a finger dipped in pale red ink. These were sold or granted about that time to the Canada Company, and were open for settlement by purchase.

2. Then there was another seventh of the land, with a dusky blur on them, made as if with a finger-tip dipped in common black ink.
These were the clergy reserves, and at that time might be leased, but not bought.

3. Besides the above, there were in all the townships lots with the letter D written upon them, some in single two-hundred-acre lots, and sometimes in blocks of several hundred or a thousand acres. These, we are told, belonged to certain great estates of favoured persons in different parts of the country and deeded to them; and they were always the best lands, but they were “taboo” to the settler.

 

Grantham Township,

Lincoln County

The following description of Grantham Township and its villages is quoted from the Illustrated Historical Atlas of the Counties of Lincoln and Welland, Ont. Toronto: H.R. Page & Co., 1876.

Township of Grantham

The Township of Grantham is bounded on the north by Lake Ontario, on the east by the Township of Niagara, on the south by a small portion of the Township of Stamford, and by the Township of Thorold (Welland County) and on the west by the Township of Louth. This Township has about 23,415 acres, and its soil is suitable for raising the usual crops; and apples, pears, peaches, and the various berries do unusually well, as they, in fact, do through the whole extent of the Counties of Lincoln and Welland.

The Township was first settled during the year 1784, when members of Butler’s Rangers who were discharged during that year, commenced to clear up land to make homes in the township. Many of those who received land from the Government considered it worth little, or nothing and bartered away their sites for mere trifles, and those who look over the map of Grantham which was made about 1784, or the year after, will notice the large tracts of land which some persons owned, and which, in many instances, were bought for sums almost too low to be called a price.

Grantham Township at the present is flourishing in every way, and its school system and churches are equal, and in many respects superior, to those of the other townships.

The British Constitutional Act of 1791 officially divided the old colony of "Province of Quebec" into the primarily French-speaking "Province of Lower Canada," and the primarily English-speaking "Province of Upper Canada." Upper Canada was located upriver, closest to the source of the St. Lawrence river.

In 1841, the Act of Union officially united the two Provinces into the single Province of Canada, with the creation of Canada East and Canada West.

Ontario was known as: "Upper Canada" from December 26, 1791, to February 10, 1841; "Canada West" from February 10, 1841, to July 1, 1867; and "Ontario" after July 1, 1867.

Canada was founded on July 1, 1867. On this date, the colonies of Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia linked to form the sovereign dominion of Canada in a process called confederation. At this time, Upper Canada and Lower Canada became Quebec and Ontario. Therefore the new confederation comprised of four provinces: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario. The confederation led to a territorial evolution leading to the incorporation of other parts of British North America into the newly formed entity of Canada to form what is today contemporary Canada. Newfoundland and Labrador was the last province to be incorporated into the confederation in 1949. For a period of many years since Confederation, Canada has undergone many territorial changes and expansions, eventually forming the current union of ten provinces and three territories.

The formation of Canada and attainment of its independence was a gradual process. Despite the existence of a responsible government in Canada, the United Kingdom continued to claim sovereignty over the land until the end of the World War I. The 1931 passing of the statute of Westminster recognized Canada as equal with the United Kingdom but the country was denied the power to amend its constitution. Dependence on the British parliament in Canada was removed in 1982 after patriation of the constitution. Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II being the head of state.