Christopher William Searl


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Christopher William "Bill" Searl was born October 27, 1848, near the future Village of Bowmanville, Darlington Twp., Durham Co., Canada West, and died February 3, 1933, in Salt Creek, Natrona Co., WY, at age 84. Buried in Douglas Park Cemetery, Douglas, Converse Co., WY. He is the son of John Searl of Broadoak (Braddock) Parish, County Cornwall, England, and Elizabeth "Eliza" Bailey of Ireland.

Mary C. Silver was born May 7, 1848, in Waterford, Bellamacabron, Ireland, was Baptized April 15, 1849, in Newcastle Church, Newcastle Parish, Knocknaree, Ireland, and died December 29, 1925, at her home, Douglas, Converse Co., WY, at age 77. Buried in Douglas Park Cemetery, Douglas, Converse Co., WY. She is the daughter of Patrick Silver Jr. and Catherine Moroney, both of Ireland.

Christopher William "Bill" Searl and Mary M. Silver were married August 28, 1878, in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk Co., IA.

Christopher William "Bill" Searl and Mary M. (Silver) Searl had four children:

  1. Clara Mae Silver Searl: Born October 20, 1879, in the Village of Janesville, Jackson Twp., Bremer Co., IA; Died March 21, 1952, in Douglas, Converse Co., WY (age 72). Married November 21, 1899, in Springhill, Albany Co., WY, to Emmett M. Newell: Born December 2, 1869, in Union Twp., Black Hawk Co., IA; Died January 6, 1951, in Douglas, Converse Co., WY (age 81). Clara was the postmaster in Esterbrook for 20 years. Both are buried in Douglas Park Cemetery, Douglas, Converse Co., WY.
  2. Matilda Emma Searl: Born October 6, 1891, Sibley, Osceola Co., IA; Died July 22, 1958, in a hospital in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX (age 66). Married about 1907 in Wyoming to John Walter Stanton: Born April 4, 1884, in Springfield Twp., La Porte Co., IN; Died April 28, 1953, in Anson General Hospital, Anson, Madison Co., TX (age 70).
  3. Francis Edson Searl: Born February 5, 1887, in Le Sueur, Le Sueur Co., MN; Died January 22, 1970, in Dallas, Polk Co., OR (age 82). Buried in Dallas Cemetery, Dallas, Polk Co., OR. Married about 1915 in Wyoming to Katherine Elizabeth Dowson: Born September 1893 in Denver, Arapahoe Co., CO; Died November 22, 1974, in Polk Co., OR (age 81). Buried in Dallas Cemetery, Dallas, Polk Co., OR.
  4. Unknown Son Searl: Born Unknown; Died Unknown (about age Infant).



TIMELINE


Christopher William "Bill" Searl and Mary M. (Silver) Searl are buried in Douglas Park Cemetery, Douglas, Converse Co., WY. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


Catherine (Moroney) Silver and Mary M. Silver

Christopher William "Bill" Searl and Mary M. (Silver) Searl, about age 34.

Mary M. (Silver) Searl, age 70.


Mary C. Silver was born May 7, 1848, in Waterford, Bellamacabron, Ireland.

Christopher William Searl was born October 28, 1848, near the unincorporated Village of Bowmanville, Darlington Twp., Durham Co., Canada West.

The 1851 Canadian Census shows John Syrell (age 30) born in England with Bible Christian religion is a Laborer living in a Log Home in Darlington Twp., Durham Co., Canada West. Living with him is Eliza Syrell (age 26) born in Ireland is a Spinster with Bible Christian religion. Also living there are four Syrell children, all born in Canada with Bible Christian religion: Cat. Mat. Syrell (age 7), a House Maid; John H. Syrell (age 6), a House Boy; Chris. Wm. Syrell (age 4), a Small Boy; and Eliza Ann Syrell (age 2), an Infant.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on September 1, 1860, shows John Searles (age 40) born in Ireland with real estate of $800 and personal estate of $530 is a Farmer living in Franklin Twp., DeKalb Co., IL. Living with him is Eliza Searles (age 27) born in Canada, a Housekeeper. Also living there are seven Searles children, all born in Canada except for Mary, who was born in Wisconsin: Matilda Searles (age 15); John Searles (age 13); Christopher Searles (age 11); Eliza A. Searles (age 9); Thomas Searles (age 7); Robert Searles (age 6); and Mary Searles (age 3).

The Patrick Silver family emigrated to the U. S. A. in 1864, departing Liverpool, England, on aboard the S. S. Thornton and arriving in the Port of New York on June 13, 1864.


Pat Silver Lab age 50
Cath Silver Wife age 33
Mary Silver Child age 11
Kate Silver Child age 10
Peggy Silver Child age 9
Ellen Silver Child age 3
Honora Silver Child age Infant

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 6, 1870, shows Patrick Silver (age 60) born in Ireland is a Day Laborer living in the 3rd Ward, Cedar Falls, Black Hawk Co., IA. Living with him is Catharine Silver (age 41) born in Ireland, who is Keeping House. Also living there are his five children: Kate Silver (age 18) born in Ireland, a Domestic Servant; Maggie Silver (age 16) born in Ireland, a Domestic Servant; Ellen Silver (age 11) born in Ireland; Michael Silver (age 4) born in Iowa; and John Silver (age 0/12, May) born in Iowa.

Christopher William Searl and Mary M. Silver were married August 28, 1878, in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk Co., IA.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 1, 1880, shows Wm. Searls (age 31) born in Canada to English and Irish-born parents is a Laborer living in the Village of Janesville, Jackson Twp., Bremer Co., IA. Living with him is his wife, Mary Searls (age 30) born in Ireland to Irish-born parents, who Keeps House. Also living there is his daughter, Clara Searls (age 7/12) born October 1879 in Iowa to Canadian and Irish-born parents.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 1, 1880, shows Patrick Silver (age 64) born in Ireland to Irish-born parents is a Farmer living in Jackson Twp., Bremer Co., IA. Living with him is his wife, Katharine Silver (age 50) born in Ireland to Irish-born parents, who Keeps House. Also living there are his four unmarried children, all born to Irish-born parents: Kate Silver (age 27) born in Ireland; Ellen Silver (age 21) born in Ireland; Michael Silver (age 14) born in Iowa; and John Silver (age 10) born in Iowa. Also living there is Michael's grandson: John Richardson (age 7) born in Iowa to Irish-born parents.

The 1885 Minnesota State Census taken on May 1, 1885, shows C. Wm. Searls (age 36) born in Canada to foreign-born parents and having lived in Minnesota for 11 years and having lived in this district for 11 years is a Laborer living in the 1st Ward, City of Le Sueur, Le Sueur Co., MN. Living with him is his wife, M. C. Searl (age 43) born in Ireland to foreign-born parents, who is a Housewife. Also living with him are two children, both born in Iowa to foreign-born parents: Clara M. Searls (age 4); and Matilda E. Searles (age 0).

The 1895 Minnesota State Census taken on June 9, 1895, shows C. W. Searl (age 44) born in Canada to foreign-born parents is living in the Borough of Le Sueur, Le Sueur Co., MN. Living with him is Mary M. Searls (age 35) born in Ireland to foreign-born parents. Also living with him are three children, all born to foreign-born parents: Clara Searl (age 14) born in Iowa; Emma Searle (age 11) born in Iowa; and Eddie Searle (age 7) born in Minnesota.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 26, 1900, shows Emmett M. Newell (age 29) born December 1870 in Iowa to Ohio-born parents is a Stock Farmer renting his farm and is living in Laramie Peak District, Albany Co., WY. Living with him is his wife of 0 years, Clare Newell (age 21) born October 1879 in Iowa to English Canadian and Irish-born parents. Also living there are two Boarders. Several other Newell families live nearby.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 18, 1910, shows Christopher Searl (age 59) born in English Canada to English-born parents and a Naturalized citizen is a Section Foreman Carpenter renting his own home and is living in the Village of Manville, Converse Co., WY. Living with him is his wife of 32 years, Mary Searl (age 59) born in Ireland to Irish-born parents, with both of the children born to her still alive. Living next door is Francis E. Searle.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 18, 1910, shows Francis E. Searl (age 28) born in Minnesota to English Canadian and Irish-born parents is an unmarried Oil Well Driller owning his own home free of a mortgage and is living in the Village of Manville, Converse Co., WY.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on May 7, 1910, shows Emmett M. Newell (age 39) born in Iowa to Ohio-born parents is a Stock Farm Farmer owning his own farm free of a mortgage and is living in Laramie Peak District, Albany Co., WY. Living with him is his wife of 10 years, Clara M. Newell (age 31) born in Iowa to English Canadian and Irish-born parents. Also living there is his daughter, Evelyn M. Newell (age 9) born in Wyoming to Iowa-born parents. Several other Newell families live nearby.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 26, 1920, shows Christopher W. Searl (age 68) born in English Canada to English and Irish-born parents is a House Carpenter owning his own home free of a mortgage and is living in South Douglas Precinct, Converse Co., WY. Living with him is his wife, Mary M. Searl (age 68) born in Ireland to Irish-born parents and having emigrated in 1864 and a Naturalized citizen. Living next door is the Edson F. Searle family.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 26, 1920, shows Edson F. Searl (age 31) born in Minnesota to English Canadian and Irish-born parents is a Stationary Engineer owning his own home with a mortgage and is living in South Douglas Precinct, Converse Co., WY. Living with him is his wife, Katharine E. Searl (age 26) born in Colorado to Illinois and New York-born parents. Also living there is his son, Kenneth L. Searl (age 1-9/12) born in Wyoming to Minnesota and Colorado-born parents.

Mary C. (Silver) Searl died December 29, 1925, at her home, Douglas, Converse Co., WY, at age 77. Buried in Douglas Park Cemetery, Douglas, Converse Co., WY.


Birth: May 7, 1848, County Waterford, Ireland

Death: Dec. 29, 1925, Douglas, Converse County, Wyoming, USA

Mary M. Searl, long-time resident of Douglas, died at her home Tuesday afternoon. Her health had been failing for over a year and for the past six months she was confined to her bed most of the time. Mary Silver Searl was a native of County Waterford, Ballemacabra, Ireland, the daughter of Patrick and Catherine (Maroony) Silver. She came to America with her parents in 1860 and after living with them awhile in New York state, they moved to Cedar Falls, Ia., where she grew to womanhood. On August 28, 1878, she was married at Waverly, Iowa to C. W. Searl, a native of Canada. In 1884 she and her husband moved to La Sueur, Minn. where she lived until June 1, 1900 when she and her family moved to Douglas where she has lived until the time of her death. She leaves to mourn her loss, her husband, C. W. Searl; two daughters, Mrs. Emmett Newell of Esterbrook and Mrs. Emma Stanton of Del Rio, Texas; one son, Ed of Oakley, Kan. Also two brothers, Mike Silver of Waterloo, Ia. and John Silver of Cedar Falls, Ia.; and a sister, Mrs. Ellen Hannar of Davenport, Ia. A strange happening is that the other sister, Mrs. Frank Newell passed away eleven days ago at her home in Esterbrook. (Information was obtained from her obituary in the Douglas Budget Jan. 7, 1926; mortuary and cemetery records.)


The 1930 U. S. Census taken on May 30, 1930 shows Francis Searl (age 42) born in Minnesota to English Canadian and Irish-born parents and first married at age 27 is a Rail Road Section Foreman living in Election District 3, Natrona Co., WY. Living with him is his wife, Catherine D. Searl (age 36) born in Colorado to Illinois and New York-born parents and first married at age 21. Also living there are his two sons, both born to Minnesota and Colorado-born parents: Kenneth Searl (age 11) born in Wyoming; and Wayne Searle (age 3-11/12) born in Kansas. Also living there is Francis' widowed father: Christopher Searl (age 81) born in English Canada to English and Irish-born parents and first married at age 35 and having emigrated in 1857 and a Naturalized citizen.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 2, 1930 shows Emmett M. Newell (age 56) born in Iowa to Ohio-born parents and first married at age 26 is a Farmer owning his own farm and is living in Laramie Peak District, Albany Co., WY. Living with him is his wife, Clara M. Newell (age 50) born in Iowa to English Canadian and Irish-born parents and first married at age 20, who is a Post Master at a Post Office. Also living there is his daughter, Evelyn M. Newell (age 9) born in Wyoming to Iowa-born parents. Also living there is a widowed Hired Man. Several other Newell families live nearby.

Christopher William Searl died February 3, 1933, in Salt Creek, Natrona Co., WY, at age 84. Buried in Douglas Park Cemetery, Douglas, Converse Co., WY.


OLD RESIDENT OF WYOMING CALLED

C. W. Searl First Came to State in 1864

C. W. Searl, for many years a resident of Douglas and Manville, was claimed in death after a brief illness, at the home of his son, Ed, in Salt Creek, February 3. The body was shipped to Douglas Friday and funeral services were held Saturday afternoon from the Hoffman Chapel, conducted by Rev. Clayton Judy of the Congregational church. Interment was made in the Douglas cemetery. Christopher William Searl was born in Bowman, Canada, October 27, 1848, being 84 years old at the time of his death. When he was six years old he moved with his parents to Fon Dulac, Wis., where he lived for a few years until the family moved to Rockford, Ill., where he received his schooling. When 16 years old he came to Wyoming and worked as a government freighter for three years. Then he entered the employ of the Union Pacific during its construction days and was in Wyoming for several years, when he returned east and married Miss Mary Silver in 1878. She, his faithful wife and companion, passed on six years ago. Four children were born to this union, one son who died in infancy. Mrs. Emmett Newell of Esterbrook, Mrs. Emma Stanton of Del Rio, Tex., and a son, Ed, of Salt Creek, still survive him. A sister, Mrs. Brown, is also living, in Minneapolis, and two brothers in Iowa. In 1900 Mr. Searl moved back to Wyoming and was employed by the Northwestern railroad for 15 years and remained here until the time of his death. He was a Wyoming pioneer and had many thrilling experiences during the frontier days. He was a good husband and father and loyal to his many friends. He left an example of true living and his passing has removed another good citizen from this earth.


EARLY DAY RANCHER DIES AT SALT CREEK

FUNERAL HELD HERE FRIDAY FOR LATE FATHER OF MRS. NEWELL

C. W. Searl for many years a resident of Douglas and Manville was claimed in death after a brief illness at the home of his son, Ed, in Salt Creek, Wyoming, Wednesday night, February 3rd. The body was shipped to Douglas Friday from the Gay Mortuary in Casper and funeral services were held Saturday afternoon from the Hoffman Chapel, conducted by Rev. Judy of the Congregational church. Interment was made in the Douglas cemetery. Christopher William Searl was born in Bowman, Canada, October 27, 1848, being 84 years old at the time of his death. When he was six years old he moved with his parents to Fon Dulac, Wis., and lived a few years till the family moved to Rockford, Ill., where he received his schooling and grew up to young manhood. When he was 16 years old he came to Wyoming and worked as a government freighter for three years. Then he entered the employ of the Union Pacific during its construction days and was in Wyoming for several years, then he returned east and married to Miss Mary Silver in 1878. She, his faithful wife and companion, passed on six years ago. Four children were born to this union, one son who died in infancy, Mrs. Emmett Newell of Esterbrook, Wyo., Mrs. Emma Stanton of Del Rio, Texas, and a son Ed of Salt Creek, Wyoming still survive him. A sister, Mrs. Brown, is also living, in Minneapolis, Minn. and two brothers in Iowa. In 1900 Mr. Searl moved back to Wyoming and was employed by the North Western Railroad for 15 years. He remained in Wyoming until the time of his death. He was a Wyoming pioneer and told many thrilling experiences during the frontier days. He was a good husband and father and loyal to his many friends. He left an example of true living and his passing has removed another good citizen from this earth.


Ontario was known as: Upper Canada from 10 Jun 1791 to 10 Feb 1841; Canada West from 10 Feb 1841 to 1 Jul 1867; and Ontario after 1 Jul 1867.

Between 1885 and the early 1980s Durham County went through considerable changes: Manvers Township became part of Victoria County; Cavan and South Monaghan Townships became part of Peterborough County; and Hope Township became part of Northumberland County.

When Ontario County was abolished in the 1970s, the Townships of Thorah, Brock, Scott, Uxbridge, Pickering, Reach, Whitby and Scugog became part of Durham County.


The First 200 Years,

A Brief History of Darlington Township

Darlington Township was first settled by Europeans in 1794, with the arrival of three United Empire Loyalist families from the U.S. - the Conants, the Burk’s and the Trull’s.

It was John Burk who settled in Lot 14, where the town of Bowmanville would eventually take shape. Because of the excellent water power of the two creeks in the area, many mills were built in the early days of settlement, giving a good basis for the community. Located as it was (and still is) on the Danforth Road (today’s Highway #2) businesses flourished with the trade that travelled the road - both goods and people. Bowmanville, the first community to form in the township, became the seat of township government. It was not until 1854, when Bowmanville became incorporated as a town, that the seat of township government was transferred to Hampton, a mill town just north of Bowmanville on the same creek.

In the 1830's settlement from Great Britain began in earnest. Prior to this, the majority of settlers came from the U.S. and the eastern parts of Ontario (sons of United Empire Loyalists who had received grants in that area). In 1831 Great Britain finally allowed skilled labour to emigrate, and so in the 1830's we see towns begin all over the township with millers, blacksmiths, carriage makers, etc. settling in the area.

Some of the early settlers were retired army personel - most, commissioned officers from disbanded regiments. Some were disbanded from British Army Regiments (regulars) while others were disbanded from Provincial Corps. Though both types of regiments were in actual fact regular army, the Provincial Corps were made up of men recruited in Canada to serve only on Canadian soil, while the British regiments were recruited in Britain to serve where ever their King might need them. For genealogical purposes, it is sometimes handy to know the difference. But keep in mind that just because an ancestor was in a Provincial regiment did not preclude him from being born in Britain.

The usual local port of entry for settlers to Darlington was at Port Hope, also in Durham County, and many Darlington families arrived at Port Hope in the 1830's and 40's leaving traces in the history of Hope Township, though brief their stay there may have been.

Records of the township indicate many professions - smiths of all kinds, hotel keepers, shop keepers, carpenters, brick layers, weavers - but by far, the most common profession was that of farmer. Most farmers of Darlington were Yeoman farmers, in that they owned their own land. Less than half were tenants. In other townships in Durham County those figures change.


MIGRATION OF THE SILVER FAMILY

FROM  BALLYMACARBRY TO IOWA USA

By Gary H. "Joe" Searl, Grandson of Mary Silver

Mary Silver was born in a cabin located on the north side of the Knockacoola Townland in 1849, near BALLYMACARBRY. She died 77 years later in 1926 in Wyoming, USA, not long before my own birth in 1931.  Until recently I knew only that she was born in County Waterford and arrived in the US as a young adult.  Now with the access to records available at the National Library in Dublin, the Waterford Heritage Center and a plethora, of online records in Ireland and the US, it is now possible to track her family from the early 19th century through today.  Such records, when combined with local and family stories, enhance our understanding of the migration process. Both joy and frustrations are experienced in such a search as questions are raised and answered and new questions arise that remain unsolved.

Who were the Silvers?  The name evokes an occupational origin in England and is in fact common there but there were no Silvers in any Anglo-Norman list or recorded in the Cromwell invasion.  Not until the 17th century does a Silver name appear in any records I discovered.  During that century, in western Waterford, two Silver “gents” appear in Tallow Parish: Maurice Silver at Ballyhander and Richard Silver in Killmore.  Maurice left a will in 1628, and Richard is recorded in the 1659 Census. While they didn’t live in the same townland, it is likely they were related and could be the ancestors of Patrick Silver in Knockacoola.  The date of the census and the designation of ‘gent’ raise a question as to how Richard  survived the Cromwell confiscation if he was of Catholic and of old English origin.  If he was protestant, there had to be a change in religion as my great-grandfather Patrick in the 19th century was Catholic. It is possible that a Silver man married a Catholic woman and any children followed the beliefs of the mother.  While not likely a common event at the time, it did happen.  It is also possible that Richard Silver had yet to be forced to move beyond the Shannon River as did many other Catholics who defied Cromwell’s governing. Many Silvers in the 19th century lived in Galway

Several Silvers were listed in the Kiloran (now Fourmilewater) parish records in the 19th century (see end notes) and that is where Patrick Silver Sr. and Patrick Silver Jr. are listed in Griffith’s Valuation as tenants sharing 30 acres in Knockacoola Townland.  Patrick Silver Sr. was buried in the Kilcreggane cemetery in 1849 at age 60.  No other records have been found for him, but his son Patrick Jr. leaves a more complete document trail.  He was born about 1810 in Ireland and died in Iowa, USA soon after 1886.  He married Catherine Moroney in Ireland before the famine ended. Such a late marriage suggests that he might have been a widower, but there is no record to support that theory. In 1849 Patrick Jr. and his wife Catherine were living together in a separate dwelling but sharing the land with his elderly father. As Patrick was already close to 40, he had considerable life events to influence his way of thinking.

Before the Great Famine of the late 1840s, Patrick had already witnessed several calamities including the famines of 1822, 1830-1834, and 1836.  Patrick also lived through the big wind of 1839.  A Clonmel newspaper describes the event:

            In the Main street and Irishtown piles of chimneys were blown down —the roofs of houses partially carried away —and trees, which has stood the fury of the tempest for centuries, torn from their roots and scattered a considerable distance. (C.H.) "At intervals, during the night, heavy rain fell in torrents, (but no rain in Cashel!) which was blown so impetuously against the windows that several of them were dashed in and much damage ensued. We have had some heavy falls of snow and hail since yesterday, succeeded by a partial frost. It is feared that the county districts have suffered much from the storm." (T.C.)

With 30 acres Patrick was able to escape the blinding poverty of day laborers and small farmers. The finical security that much acreage provided would have given him a great deal more freedom and opportunity.  What was his everyday life like? What pathways to weekly and occasional activities were used?  What and where were these activities?  Until a chapel was built in Fourmilewater in1826, mass was conducted in a structure near the cemetery at Kilcreggane.  This would be just a short (a bit over a mile) distance downhill from Knockacoola.  Shopping for most household items could have been at nearby Newcastle, which held fairs. Walking was also an option as my reading of 19th century Ireland suggests that a five or six-mile walk was not considered a burden.  It is at Newcastle fairs where faction fighting occurred.  I do wonder if my great-grandfather Patrick engaged in such endeavors as a ”shanavest” fighting with caravats.  Knockacoola  means corner of a hill and is referred today as cold lands placing a limit on tillage.  I have yet to determine where the market for the farm products might have been other than the fairs.  So did the Silvers have a horse and carriage to take journeys to Clonmel?

During the great famine population changed little in Knockacoola with the 1841 population of 69 reduced to 66 a mere ten years later.  Kilroran Parish lost 1755 of its 4772 people during the same decade. One loss in Knockacoola was the death of Patrick Silver Sr.  His son, Patrick Silver Jr., was already married to Catherine Moroney at the time and famine was still crippling Ireland. The importance of their 1849 marriage is that the fortunes of Patrick were sufficient to take on the responsibilities of a family.  Catharine was about 20 years younger than her husband.  How did they link up?  Did they meet at a crossroads dance?  At church or a fair?  Was there a matchmaker involved?   There is no record of her birth at the Waterford Heritage Center.  The Moroney name was common in the area with families near by in Knockatrellane and  Curtiswood.  Catherine was also illiterate and family stories in Iowa reported that she spoke broken English

Patrick and Catherine’s family soon expanded to five daughters and a single son who died before departure to Iowa.  The three oldest girls, Mary, Kate, and Maggie all could read and write English and must have attended the national school. The national archives in Dublin describe the Bennett’s  Church building as measuring 17 ½ x 40 feet.  A visual inspection reveals a fireplace on each end. The school in 1857 had a total enrollment of 138 pupils with an average daily attendance of 77.  The pupils were  taught by William Keeting (age 26) and an assistant.  All female children learned needlework.  Before Ellen, the youngest daughter started school, the Silver family left Ireland for Iowa.

After surviving the famine, why did the Silver family leave Ireland in 1864? And why go to Iowa?  Three years of terrible weather blanketed Ireland starting in 1860.  The Clonmel Chronicle of June 16, 1860, reports ceaseless torrents, rivers swollen to the bank, flooded roadways, and an acre of potatoes carried away.  The next two years were among Ireland’s wettest and driest. Patrick had already experienced several famines, a cholera epidemic, the big wind, and the rise of political activism of ‘Young Ireland.’  He certainly had heard news of murders and executions and, during his last year in Ireland, the murder and pretrial hearing at Ballymacarbry.  

Iowa seemed to be the intended destination.  Family stories tell of relatives in Dumont, only 25 miles from Cedar Falls, but no contact was maintained as descendants of the Dumont connection have no knowledge of relatives in Cedar Falls. But the Dumont heritage dates to John and Alice Silver who lived in Cedar Falls during the 1860 US Census and had moved to Dumont by 1870.  Not far from Cedar Falls is New Melleray Abbey founded by monks from Mt. Melleray in Waterford.  Patrick would have been part of the massive labor force drawn from every nearby parish to help build walls at Mt. Melleray in the early 1830s.  One of the sponsors for a Silver child lived near Mt. Melleray.  Was Patrick attracted to Iowa because he had heard about the landscape and the chance of opportunity resulting from communication with someone in Iowa that might have been passed on through the local gossip network? Or is it merely a coincidence? 

The Silver family departed from Liverpool to New York City on the sailing ship Thornton with over 700 other passengers. The six week journey ended June 13 at the Castle Garden Reception Center in New York City. Just outside the building the Silvers were reminded that the American Civil War was still going on as they could see recruiters for the Union Army seeking more soldiers. As they boarded a train to Iowa, the family consisted of Patrick, Catherine, and their five daughters with toddler Honora the youngest. Family stories in Iowa tell of Honora dying on the journey to Iowa.  Her mother insisted she be buried in Iowa and kept the body until arrival.  While walking from one train station to another in Chicago, a man on a carriage noted the family’s despair and gave them some money. If Honora died on the train from New York to Chicago, the family would have been visibility distraught.  After a short train trip from Chicago, the Silvers arrived in Iowa.

The Silvers new life started in Cedar Falls with Patrick working as a laborer and sometime stonemason.  He may have learned enough about stone work from his brief experience at Mt. Melleray or he could have helped build the bridges for the railroad through Clonmel.  Two sons were added to the family while living in Cedar Falls. Michael was born in1866, joined by John in 1870. My grandmother Mary was out of the house and her activities and location remain unknown until her marriage in 1878.  Her sisters all lived with their parents with Kate and Maggie working as domestics while 11-year-old Ellen attended school.

The Silver family moved north of Cedar Falls to Finchford by 1880, and Patrick returned to farming. The censuses of several different years show daughters getting married, suffering widowhood, and marrying again. After the year 1900 the daughters become scattered beyond Iowa to Illinois and Wyoming. Kate was widowed three times and lived out her last years in Waterloo, a city next to Cedar Falls. Ellen was widowed twice and lived her last years in Peoria, Illinois, with her son.  The two Silver sons stayed close to home.  Michael never married, but John had four sons and left numerous descendants in Iowa and elsewhere. In my own case, my grandmother Mary did not marry until she was 29. She wed Christopher William Searl, born 1848 in Canada to an English father and an Irish mother.  Mary must have met “Bill” when she was visiting her parents near Finchford.  Bill was a section crew foreman on a nearby railroad.  They lived a few miles away in Janesville for several years, moved to Minnesota, and finally to Wyoming where my father completed high school and, years later, I was born.  Mary’s sister Maggie married a man who once lived in Finchford but had moved to the same part of Wyoming where Mary and Bill Searl lived to in 1900.  All this migration resulted in enough distance so that descendants in Wyoming and Iowa had no knowledge of each other.

There are a few surviving folktales associated with Patrick.  In Ireland there is the story of the family dog predicting the famine.  And it was said that some were hesitant of going to the Silver lands as they might never be seen again.  In Iowa, Patrick told people that he had changed his name from Murphy as there were too many with that name.  He might have been told too many times that he wasn’t really Irish with a name like Silver.

 The Silver migration is a very common story of Irish success in America but differs from the stereotype of hard-drinking ghetto Irish living in such large cities as New York and Boston.  The descendants of Patrick and Catherine engaged in a variety of pursuits and lived comfortably though scattered from the middle of the US to the west coast.

Searching for my Irish ancestry has been most gratifying as I have communicated with long-lost cousins and have been able to visit the location of my grandmother’s birth.  I have enjoyed the friendliness of the Irish people, who have helped me in so many ways including: Larry and Kathleen Walsh, the present owners of the Silver lands; Michael Hallinan, who hosted me for an evening in Clontarf; and the endless help from Michael Desmond of Dear Park.  To all the Irish I have had the pleasure of meeting who have given me a thousand welcomes, I want to give back a thousand thanks.

END NOTE

I have included the parish birth records with all local Silver names and other people associated with the family.


 

 

Edson F. Searl, Le Suere?

Francis Edson Searl born February 5, 1887, in Le Ruene, MN, 6 years, 1st Sgt, Nation G.; died January 22, 1970 in Dallas, Polk Co., OR.

 

Name: Clara M Newell
Age in 1910: 31
Estimated birth year: abt 1879
Birthplace: Iowa
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Father's Birth Place: Canada English
Mother's Birth Place: Ireland
Spouse's name: Emmett M
Home in 1910: Laramie Peak, Albany, Wyoming
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Female
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Emmett M Newell 39
Clara M Newell 31
Evelyn M Newell 9

 

 

 

Name: Clara M Newell
Home in 1920: Laramie Peak, Albany, Wyoming
Age: 40 years 
Estimated birth year: abt 1880
Birthplace: Iowa
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Spouse's name: Emmit M
Father's Birth Place: Ohio
Mother's Birth Place: Ireland
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Sex: Female
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Image: 245
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Emmit M Newell 50
Clara M Newell 40

 

Name: Clara M Newell
Home in 1930: Laramie, Albany, Wyoming
Age: 50
Estimated birth year: abt 1880
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Spouse's name: Emmett M
Occupation:
Education:

Military Service:

Rent/home value:

Age at first marriage:

Parents' birthplace:
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Emmett M Newell 56
Clara M Newell 50
Herbert D Gazlay 68