Albert Gebauer


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Albert Gebauer was born Unknown in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, and died about 1855 in Prussia at age Unknown. He is the son of Unknown.

Dorothea Wiehle was born about 1819 in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, and died 1876 - 1880 in Elizabeth Twp., Lawrence Co., OH, at age Unknown. She is the daughter of Wiehle.

Albert Gebauer and Dorothea Wiehle were married about 1842 in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia.

Albert Gebauer and Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer had three children:

  1. Helen Margaret Gebauer: Born October 7, 1844, in Olan, Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, Germany; Died July 31, 1925, in Watertown, Jefferson Co., WI (age 80). Buried in Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs, Greene Co., OH. Married May 20, 1874, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH, to William Penn Baker: Born January 14, 1839, on a farm south of the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH; Died July 1, 1907, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH (age 67). Buried in Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs, Greene Co., OH.
  2. Anna Gebauer: Born about 1848 in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, Germany; Died after 1870 in Unknown.
  3. Rosalind "Rosa" Gebauer: Born about 1855 in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, Germany; Died Unknown. Rosa Margaret (Gebauer) Weiss died October 31, 1910, in Hamilton, Butler Co., OH.

Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer, now a widow, with her three children, immigrated to the United States about 1857.

Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer then married Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. was born November 26, 1825, in Spremberg, Brandenburg, Germany, and died after 1876, probably in Lawrence Co., OH, at about age 50. He is the son of Unknown.

Augusta Pauline Louise Wiehle was born about 1833 in Germany, and died May 10, 1856, in Portsmouth, Scioto Co., OH, at about age 33. She is the daughter of Johann Gottlieb "George" Wiehle (born September 20, 1795, in Silesia, Prussia, Germany; died October 12, 1870, in Portsmouth, Scioto Co., OH), and Amelia Kocke (born Unknown in Breslau, Silesia, Germany; died about 1839 in Breslau, Silesia, Germany). Johann Gottlieb "George" Wiehle lived in Harrison, Scioto Co., OH, in 1860, and is buried in Mead Cemetery, Morgan Twp., Scioto Co., OH.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. and Augusta Pauline Louise Wiehle were married Unknown.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. and Augusta Pauline Louise (Wiehle) Gerhardt had no children.

Johann Gottlieb "John" Wiehle Jr. (age 30) and Caroline Wilhelmine Henriette Sohn (age 25) were married August 30, 1857, in Niederbarnim, Brandenburg, Germany.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. then married a widow, Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. and Dorothea (Whiele) Gebauer were married January 2, 1863, in Lawrence Co., OH.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. and Dorothea (Whiele) (Gebauer) Gerhardt had one child:

  1. Charles George Gerhardt: Born January 24, 1864, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH; Died December 23, 1923, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH (age 59). Buried in Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs, Greene Co., OH. Married June 10, 1903, in Greene Co., OH, to Ella Mae Holverstott: Born September 1, 1869, in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH; Died of Pneumonia, January 9, 1946, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH (age 76).



TIMELINE

Johann Gottlieb "John" Wiehle was born January 30, 1817, in Kontschwitz, Kreis Ohlau, Silesia, Prussia, Germany, and died July 17, 1888, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA, at age 71. He is the son of Johann Gottlieb "John" Wiehle of Preuben, Germany, and Anna Maria "Amelia" Kocke of Germany. Buried in Mount Vernon Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA.

Johanna Christina Gebauer was born January 15, 1819, in Silicia, Kontschwitz, Prussia, and died November 2, 1900, in Washington, DC, at age 81. Buried in Mount Vernon Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA.

Johann Gottlieb "John" Wiehle and Johanna Christiana Gebauer were married October 14, 1845, in Silesia, Prussia.

Johann Gottlieb "John" Wiehle Jr. (age 30) and Caroline Wilhelmine Henriette Sohn (age 25) were married August 30, 1857, in Niederbarnim, Brandenburg, Germany.

Albert Gebauer was born Unknown in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia.

Dorothea Wiehle was born about 1819 in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. was born November 26, 1825, in Spremberg, Brandenburg, Germany.


Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. Birth Record.


Augusta Pauline Louise Wiehle was born about 1833 in Germany.

Albert Gebauer and Dorothea Wiehle were married about 1842 in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia.

Helen Margaret Gebauer was born October 7, 1845, in Olan, Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, Germany.

Gottlob Wiehle (age 32), Christ. Gebauer (a female, age 29), Max Wiehle (age 2) and Robert Wiehle (age 11), arrived November 14, 1848, in the Port of New York, NY, from Bremen, Germany, on aboard the Barque Wieland.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on July 27, 1850, shows Isaac Baker (age 43) born in Pennsylvania with Real Estate of $1,500 is a Farmer living in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is Eliza Baker (age 41) born in Ohio. Also living there are seven children, all born in Ohio: George Baker (age 18), a Farmer; Louisa L. Baker (age 16); John H. Baker (age 13); William Baker (age 11); Brinton Baker (age 8); Joseph Baker (age 6); and Hesther Baker (age 9/12).

Albert Gebauer died about 1855 in Prussia, at age Unknown.

Augusta Pauline Louise (Wiehle) Gerhardt died May 10, 1856, in Portsmouth, Scioto Co., OH, at about age 33.

Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer (age 36) born in Wuttemberg, departed from Le Havre, France, aboard SS Admiral, and arrived November 14, 1856, in the Port of New York, NY.


Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer Immigration Record.


The 1860 U. S. Census taken on June 8, 1860, shows Isaac Baker (age 52) born in Pennsylvania with real estate of $2,550 and personal estate of $400 is a Farmer living in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is Eliza Baker (age 51) born in Ohio. Also there are five children, all born in Ohio: George Baker (age 28) with real estate of $500, a Blacksmith; Joseph Baker (age 17); Hester Baker (age 10); Sarah Baker (age 8); and Charles Baker (age 4).

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on August 1, 1860, shows Gotleib Gerhart (age 34) born in Prussia, and with personal estate of $300 is a Furnace Laborer, and is living in Vernon Twp., Scioto Co., OH. Living with him are: Dorothea Gerhart (age 41) born in Prussia; Helen Gabauer (age 15) born in Prussia; and Anna Gabauer (age 12) born in Prussia.

Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. and Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer were married January 2, 1863, in Lawrence Co., OH.


Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. and Doretha Wieler were married January 2, 1863, in Lawrence Co., OH. Marriage Index, Book 8, Page 5, December 1862 - April 1866


The Civil War Draft Report dated July 18, 1863, shows Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr., age 63, born in Germany, is a Blacksmith, and is living in Elizabeth Twp., Lawrence Cop., OH.


The Civil Ward Draft Record for Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr.


Charles George Gerhardt was born January 24, 1864, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH.


The Ironton Register, Ironton, Lawrence C., OH, March 12, 1868

PROBATE COURT

We take the following from the Court's record for the past week:
Ezra E. Adams filed first account as Guardian of S. J. Argo's heirs.
Gottleib Gerhardt of Germany was naturalized.
C. M. Golden and Arvilla Spicer, filed first account as administrators of Wm. H. Spicer, deceased.


The 1870 U. S. Census taken on July 8, 1870, shows William P. Baker (age 30) born in Ohio with real estate of $500 is an unmarried Painter and is living in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. He is living in the household of a Retired Merchant, Nathaniel Benedict.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 5, 1870, shows Isaac Baker (age 62) born in Pennsylvania with real estate of $7,000 and personal estate of $870 is a Farmer and is living in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is Eliza Baker (age 61) born in Ohio, who is Keeping House. Also there are three children, all born in Ohio: Joseph Baker (age 26), a Journeyman Plasterer; Esther Baker (age 20), who is Helping Mother; and Charles Baker (age 15), who Works on the Farm.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 23, 1870, shows Gottlieb Garhart (age 44) born in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, and with real estate of $2,500 and personal estate of $400 is a Farmer, and is living in Elizabeth Twp., Lawrence Co., OH. Living with him are: Dora Garhart (age 31) born in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, who Keeps Up House; Helen Garhart (age 24) born in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, who Helps Mother; Anna Garhart (age 21) born in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, who Helps Mother; Rasa Garhart (age 9) born in Silesia (Slazen), Prussia, who Helps Mother; and Charles Garhart (age 6) born in Ohio.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 5, 1870, shows George Baker (age 38) born in Ohio with personal estate of $580 is a Farmer and is living in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is Eliza Baker (age 30) born in Ireland, who is Keeping House. Also there are three children, all born in Ohio: Mary Baker (age 3); William Baker (age 2); and Elizabeth Baker (age 2). Mary Scarlett (age 12) born in  Ireland, also lives in the household.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 2, 1870, shows Anthony Russell (age 44) born in Connecticut with real estate of $20,000 is a Printer and is living in the 5th Ward, City of Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH. Living with him is Hellen Russell (age 32) born in New York, who is Keeping House. Also living there are the following children, all born in Ohio: Mary Russell (age 11); Willis Russell (age 9); Ellen Russell (age 4); and Fanny Russell (age 1). Also living there are: Frances Willmington (age 28) born in Ohio; Florence Willmington (age 12) born in Ohio; Julia Sellcamp (age 12) born in Iowa; and Anna Gebauer (age 22) born in Prussia, a Domestic Servant.

William Penn Baker and Helen Margaret "Marie" Gebauer were married May 20, 1874, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH.

Dorothea (Wiehle) (Gebauer) Gerhardt died 1876 - 1880 in Elizabeth Twp., Lawrence Co., OH, at age Unknown.

Johann Gottlieb "John" Wiehle Jr. died about 1885 in Ohio, at about age 61.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 28, 1880, shows William P. Baker (age 40) born in Ohio to Pennsylvania and Ohio-born parents is a married House Painter, and is living in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him are: his wife, Helen M. Baker (age 34) born in Silesia to Silesia-born parents;  his son, Albert M. Baker (age 2), born in Ohio to Ohio and Silesia-born parents; his daughter, Gertrude P. Baker (age 4/12) born in Ohio to Ohio and Silesia-born parents; and his brother-in-law, Charles Gerhardt (age 15) born in Ohio to Silesia-born parents.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 1, 1880, shows Geo. Baker (age 48) born in Ohio to Pennsylvania and Ohio-born parents is a Farmer living in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is his wife Lizzie Baker (age 40) born in Ireland to Irish-born parents who is Keeping House. Also there are his four children, all born in Ohio to Ohio and Irish-born parents: Marietta Baker (age 13); Lizzie Baker (age 12); Wm. Baker (twin) age 12); and Geo. W. Baker (age 9). The Isaac Baker family lived next door.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 1, 1880, shows Isaac Baker (age 72) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents is a Farmer living in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is his wife Eliza Baker (age 71) born in Ohio to Virginia-born parents who is Keeping House. Also there are: Joseph Baker (age 36) born in Ohio to Pennsylvania and Ohio-born parents, who is a Plasterer.


The 1890 Veterans Schedule for William Penn Baker.


The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 7, 1900, shows William P. Baker (age 61) born May 1839 in Ohio to Unknown and Ohio-born parents is a House Painter owning his own home on North College Street, Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is his wife of 26 years, Helen Baker (age 55) born October 1844 in Prussia to Prussian-born parents and having emigrated in 1857. Also living there are their two unmarried children, born in Ohio to Ohio and Prussian-born parents: Albert M. Baker (age 22) born December 1878 a College Student; and Gertrude P. P. Baker (age 20) born February 1880 a College Student. Also there is William's unmarried brother-in-law, Charles G. Gerhardt (age 36) born January 1864 in Ohio to Prussian-born parents who is a Carpenter.

Charles George Gerhardt and Ella Mae Holverstott were married June 10, 1903, in Greene Co., OH.


Charles George Gerhardt and Ella Mae Holverstott Marriage Record.


William Penn Baker died July 1, 1907, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH, at age 67. Buried in Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs, Greene Co., OH.


The Xenia Daily Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Tuesday, July 2, 1907

WILLIAM P. BAKER PASSES AWAY.

Death Summons Life Long Resident of Yellow Springs and Vicinity.

William Penn Baker, a lifelong resident of Yellow Springs and the vicinity, died at 10:15 o'clock Monday night of uremic poisoning after an illness of several weeks. Mr. Baker, who was aged 68 years and two months, was born on a farm two miles south of Yellow Springs, and was the son of Isaac and Eliza Baker, pioneer residents of Greene county. He had lived in Yellow Springs since his childhood, and for many years followed the occupation of a painter. He is survived by his widow and two children, Alfred, who is now in South America, and Miss Gertrude, a teacher in the Yellow Springs schools. Three brothers, Clinton, of Dayton; Joseph, of Kansas; and Charles also survive. Mr. Baker was a veteran of the Civil War, and was a member of Burkholder G. A. R. Post in Yellow Springs. He was a member of the Presbyterian church in Yellow Springs, and for a number of years a trustee in the church. The funeral services will be held at the home Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by the Rev. George Black. The burial will be made in Glen Forrest cemetery.


DEATH CLAIMS W. P. BAKER OF YELLOW SPRINGS

He was 68 Years Old and Had Spent His Life in the Village.

Xenia, O., July 2, 1907.

William Penn Baker, a lifelong resident of Yellow Springs and the vicinity, died at 10:15 o'clock Monday night of uremic poisoning after an illness of several weeks. Mr. Baker, who was aged 68 years and two months, was born on a farm south of Yellow Springs, but had lived in Yellow Springs since his boyhood. He has been occupied as a painter for a number of years. He is survived by his widow and two children, Alfred, who is now in South America, and Miss Gertrude, a teacher in the Yellow Springs schools. Three brothers, Clinton, of Dayton; Joseph, of Kansas; and Charles also survive. Mr. Baker was a veteran of the Civil War, and was a member of the Burkholder G. A. R. Post, in Yellow Springs. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church in Yellow Springs, and for a number of years a trustee in the church. The funeral services will be held at the home Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, in charge of the Rev. George Black. The burial will be made in Glen Forest cemetery.


The Xenia Daily Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Friday, July 5, 1907

The funeral of William P. Baker was largely attended Wednesday afternoon. Rev. Geo. D. Black officiated at the services. Mr. Baker was an old pioneer painter and paper hanger and for years he did nearly all of that kind of work here. He was a splendid workman and could be trusted implicitly to do the work, and consequently found steady employment. He was a prominent member of the G. A. R., under whose auspices the funeral took place. The interment was in Glen Forest cemetery.


William Penn Baker Widow's Pension Card.


The 1910 U.S. Census taken on April 29, 1910, shows Marie H. Baker (age 64) born in Germany to German-born parents and emigrating in 1865 with 2 of her 4 children still alive is a widowed head of household owning her home on North College Street, Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with her is her unmarried daughter, Gertrude P. Baker (age 30) born in Ohio to Ohio and German-born parents, who is a School Teacher.

Robert R. Wiehle died November 18, 1913, in Ironton, Lawrence Co., OH, at age 75. Buried in Woodland Cemetery, Ironton, Lawrence Co., OH.


The Portsmouth Times, Portsmouth, Scioto Co., Saturday, November 22, 1913

OBITUARY

Robt. Wiehle

Robert Wiehle, one of the pioneer residents of Ironton, and well known soap manufacturer, answered his final summons at 4:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at his home near Sixth and Pine streets, after an illness which dates from September 1, when he was stricken with paralysis. The deceased was born in Bresslau, Germany, December 14, 1836, and consequently would have been 76 years old next month. The surviving children are: Oscar, William, Paul Edward, Elmer and Mrs. Fred Henderson. The deceased was a devoted member of the German Reformed church.


The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 15, 1920, shows LeRoy M. Bickett (age 36) born in Ohio to Ohio-born parents is a superintendent at a rubber factory who his renting his home at 604 Farwell Street, 18th Ward, City of Milwaukee, Milwaukee Co., WI. Living with him is his wife, Gertrude Bickett (age 39) born in Ohio to Ohio and Prussian-born parents. Also living there are his two daughters, both born in Ohio to Ohio-born parents: Helen Bickett (age 7); and Ruth Bickett (age 3). Also living there is Le Roy's widowed mother-in-law, Helen Baker (age 75) born in Prussia to Prussian-born parents.

Charles George Gerhardt died December 23, 1923, in the Village of Yellow Springs, Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH, at age 59. Buried in Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs, Greene Co., OH.


Charles George Gerhardt Death Certificate.


Helen Margaret "Marie" (Gebauer) Baker died July 31, 1925, in Watertown, Jefferson Co., WI, at age 79.


Watertown Daily Times, Watertown, Jefferson Co., WI, July 31, 1925

Mrs. Helen Baker Taken By Death This Morning

Mrs. Helen M. Baker, widow of William Penn Baker and mother of Mrs. L. M. Bickett, 700 Clyman Street, died early this morning at St. Mary's hospital where she had been confined for one week. Mrs. Baker had been in ill health for some time and about six weeks ago she suffered injuries in a fall and this, together with the infirmities of old age, contributed to her death. The decedent's maiden name was Helen M. Gebauer and she was a native of Prussia, Germany, having been born there October 7, 1844. She came to this country with her mother when she was a child of twelve years and they settled near Irontown, Mich. Four years ago she came to Watertown and since then had made her home with her daughter. Her husband preceded her in death eighteen years ago. Besides Mrs. Bickett she is survived by one son, Albert M. Baker, of Wakefield, Mich., and by six grandchildren. The remains will be taken to Yellow Springs, Ohio, for interment, there being no services here. Mrs. Bickett, in her bereavement, has the sincere sympathy of the community and of her friends. Leigh Larson note: Irontown is in Vernon Twp., Scioto Co., OH, not Michigan.


The Xenia Evening Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Saturday, June 23, 1928

EIGHT LOTS BOUGHT BY ANTIOCH COLLEGE

Eight lots located in the residential district of Yellow Springs, belonging to the estate of Charles Gerhart, late of Yellow Springs, have been sold to Antioch College for $3,200. Sale of the lots to the college for $400 each was confirmed by Probate Court Friday in the case of Ella Gerhart, as administratrix of the estate, against Floyd Gerhart and others. The lots were appraised at $300 each. The court also approved appraisal of six additional lots and a dwelling house belonging to the estate at $3,200 and ordered sale made. Four of the eight lots sold to the college face Center College St., and the four remaining four face South College St. The lots are vacant and adjoin college property. It is believed the sole motive of the college in purchasing the property is in order to preserve an open site for the possible future erection of new buildings.


The Xenia Daily Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Monday, January 23, 1967

OBITUARIES

WILLIAM GERHARDT

YELLOW SPRINGS - Services for William Gerhardt, 60, of Comfort Inn, Xenia Ave., who died Saturday at 1:30 a. m. at Greene Memorial Hospital, Xenia, will be conducted Tuesday at 1 p. m. at Jackson, Lytle and Coffman Funeral Home here. Friends may call at the funeral home tonight from 7 to 9 and burial will be in Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs. A native of Yellow Springs, he was the son of Charles and Ella Gerhardt. He had been an employe of Antioch College for many years. Survivors include a brother, Floyd Gerhardt of Beechwood, N. Y., and a sister, Mrs. Helen Mason of Everett, Wash. Rev. Charles Rader of St. Paul's Methodist Church in Springfield will be in charge of the services.


XENIA TOWNSHIP. - 471

Brinton Baker, dealer in saddles and harness, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1807. Thomas and Sarah, his parents, were both born in Pennsylvania, and immigrated to Ohio in 1812, and have since made this county their home. It is said the first saw mill in the county was built by them. Brinton, the subject of this sketch, was married, in 1831, to Miss Eliza Hivling, of Xenia, Ohio. Six children were born to them, Abraham H., Sarah, John A., Joshua S., Eliza J., and an infant. Abraham, the only one living, is in partnership with his father, was educated in Xenia, and has spent his life here. Mr. Baker was reared by Quaker parents, and is a very moral man. He served as county treasurer from 1852 to 1857, and has been a county infirmary director for fifteen years. He has always been, and is to-day, one of the energetic business men of Xenia. Abraham is now living on the same lot on which he was born. In 1865 he was married to Miss Sallie A. J. Miller, of Frederick City, Maryland, and is the father of three children, Mary E., John A., and Rachel J., all of whom are living with their parents. When the war broke out, he was one of the first to respond, and after its close came home with an honorable discharge, and resumed his labors at his trade. He and his father today are in the foremost rank in their business.


1831 - Business was carried on in Jamestown by about 10 families who were engaged in conducting 2 taverns, 2 general stores, 1 tannery, 2 liquor shops, 2 cake shops.  Provisions for the stores were obtained in Dayton.  School being kept in brick building in what is now the old part of Jamestown Cemetery.  It had a brick floor, puncheon benches without backs and a large open fireplace in each end; Peyton Short was the teacher.  Subjects being Geography, English Grammar and the three R's.  July 26th the Ceasarcreek Associate Presbyterian Church was formed, Elders; David Brown, James Moore, John Duncan, and James Irwin.  Charter Members; John Ireland, Josiah and Margaret Espey, John & Margaret Collins, George & Martha Junkin, Mary Anne & Margaret Irwin, Euphemia Brown, Andrew Harper, Christianna & Mary Ann Duncan, Anthony, Martha, Thomas & Ann Cannon, John and Margaret Bickett, Hugh and Janet Campbell, Mary Moore, Elizabeth Dean, Archibald & Nancy Grieve, Lancelot Junkin, Jr. & Sr., Rosanna Ginn, Catherine Wilson, James & Elizabeth Struthers, Nancy West, Mary Currie, J. C. Webb & Mary Woodburn

RECORD OF THE DEAN FAMILY OF IRELAND

Not unlike many other families, we trace the record of the Deans through trials, vicissitudes and poverty back across the sea to the Province of Ulster, Ireland and to the wilds of the Highlands of Scotland, a country rich in the production of liberty loving men and women. Many such dared to leave their native country, crossed the story Atlantic and cast their lot in the wilds of America, infested by hostile enemies and accompanied by privation and discouragements of almost every description. Only the bold spirits, like Daniel Dean, who had the courage to fight for their rights, as a rule survived the ordeal.

To such we owe the credit of having made America a safe place in which to live. Amid the pioneer work of conquering and surmounting difficulties of seeming impossibilities, Daniel Dean began his career in this country.

The ancestors of the Dean family were strictly of the Coventer faith. Daniel Dean, one with whose history we are familiar and who resided and died not more than a mile from this place, was born in the village of Tubermore in the Province of Ulster, Ireland, October 20, 1766. He immigrated to America in the year 1784 at the age of 18 years. His father, G. R. Dean and his two uncles, James and David, were soldiers in the Revolutionary War. He sent back to Ireland for his mother in the year 1790. He was a weaver by trade, prospering well in his trade. He resided for a time in Pennsylvania, then immigrated to Virginia where he was married to Miss Jannett Steele, a Scotch-Irish girl, of Augusta County, Virginia. The young couple immigrated to Kentucky near Mount Sterling where he was engaged in milling for many years, becoming quite well off in that business. He had a family of eleven children, but falling out with the institution of slavery, he determined to immigrate to Ohio, locating in Greene County in the year 1812 on Caesar's Creek where he purchased 2,000 acres of land -- this farm being a part of the same tract.

The names of his eleven children are as follows: Robert Dean, who was a soldier in the war of 1812 and who married Elizabeth Campbell; Mary C. married James Moore; Jannett S. married Hugh Campbell; Elizabeth married James Campbell; Margaret married John Bickett; William married Catherine Shook and was a soldier in the Mexican War; James married Elizabeth Pendray; Joseph married Hannah Boggs; Anna married Walter Parry; Daniel married Jane Campbell; and Julia married James Hopping. All settled down and lived in Greene County, except two -- James and Elizabeth -- who immigrated to Indiana and resided near Muncie, that state. Of these eleven children, they averaged eleven children each. They have since grown into a great multitude.

During the Civil War, 36 enlisted in the Union Army, most of them serving three years and over and out of the 36 who enlisted, 35 returned alive. Dean Perry lost a leg at the battle of Perrysville, Ky. Three of the others were slightly wounded, and James Moore died with disease at Wartrall, Tennessee and of the 36, ten are yet alive.

Of this large family of near 500, more than three-fourths are members of the Christian Church, and 90 percent are total abstainers from the use of intoxicating drink.

This reunion is the centennial anniversary of the immigration of the ancestor Daniel Dean and his family from Kentucky to Ohio. They landed in this county in September, 1812, and camped on the banks of a small stream near the site which afterward became the Dean Cemetery. Eating their first breakfast on a large flat rock, about 20 feet in circumference and perhaps two feet in thickness, which served very well for a table. This rock still remains as a relic and a monument to the memory of our ancestors.

The early history of the immigration of Daniel Dean to Ohio is so intimately associated with his brother-in-law Henry Barnes, who also immigrated from Kentucky near the same time, that we thought it would be well to give a part of his history which is so closely connected with Daniel as to make this sketch more interesting when taken together.

Daniel Dean first came to Ohio in 1808 with Henry Barnes, as did Joshua and Caleb, spying out the land. It was upon this visit that Daniel purchased this 2,000 acres of land, but soon became involved in a suit over the title which cost him $1,500 to perfect his title, which he did not succeed in doing for about three years thereafter, which delayed his removal to this County.

Henry Barnes, being an excellent mechanic, and so became a useful associate and friend of Daniel and their mutual friendship was never betrayed by either, but continued a strong support to each other during life. Barnes came to this County in 1808 with Daniel and located in Xenia, which then had only a few houses. He owned about one-fourth of the present site of the City. He built many houses in Xenia assisted by Daniel Dean, Dean furnishing the timber while Barnes did the work. Parts of some of the buildings yet remain that they built. Barnes was a strong man in other respects - he was a man of some education - was a surveyor. He was a man of General Jackson's type. He was a member of a company of Indian Hunters in Kentucky, and had been engaged in many Indian hunts in Kentucky. On his immigrating to Ohio his military character was soon recognized, and he was placed as Captain over a company of militia at his new home, and this State being full of treacherous Indians one can well see that such a man as Captain Barnes would be considered a very valuable citizen. Barnes continued to reside in Xenia until his death. He was a member of the M. E. Church, and a Christian man. He had seven children. Henry, who was during the Civil War Sheriff of Greene County and also the Treasurer of Greene County two terms; Dean, John, Andrew, Mrs. Hannah Buckles and Mrs. Eliza J. Clemans and Mrs. Elizabeth Davis, all of which families married and had large families -- valuable members of society.

To show the determination of the mother, wife of Captain Barnes, there was an emergency which required her presence back in Kentucky. She mounted her horse with her little child less than a year old, and rode back to Kentucky alone, a distance of 150 miles, back to her old home.

When Daniel Dean came to Ohio he brought with him four wagons - two four-horse teams and two two-horse teams. One of these teams belonged to Captain Barnes. On their way to Cincinnati a stray dog came to them, and as they had no dog he was encouraged to remain, which turned out to be a very valuable asset to the family. Many interesting stories were told of the value of this dog and one of Daniel's horses whose name was Jolly. They gave the name of Range to the dog. A story was told of the dog that after they had passed through Cincinnati, which was a very small village, and took the trail or road toward Greene County, and after they had gone about 15 miles, night came on and they were compelled to camp in the wood. Much fear was entertained of the Indians. At about midnight Range began to raise the alarm of the approach of an enemy. There were four men who had guns. All arose and remained up until daylight. It was supposed that the dog had in fact discovered Indians approaching attempting to steal their horses. After the arrival of the family, and for two or three days thereafter, Range was heard baying something a few hundred yards from camp not far from what is now the family cemetery. James and William took their rifles and went to see what Range had found. On reaching the point, they saw Range baying a bear. It was up on its hind feet challenging Range to a fisticuff which Range declined to accept and while in this posture, William shot him and this bear meat was relished by the family much to the credit of Range.

Another story is told of Captain Barnes and Daniel. A month or so after reaching Ohio they started out to find some friends who settled near the present site of Clifton, both riding horseback; Daniel riding Jolly a noble horse, and the dog Range following after them. On finding this settlement they were cordially received, and their company being genial and entertaining they were induced to remain with them a little too long. On starting home they had not gone far when a cloud came up and they were enveloped in darkness, and soon became bewildered and lost. Not knowing what direction to take, they finally decided to let Jolly have the reins, trusting to his instinct to take them to the camp, Range still following behind. As soon as Jolly was given the reins, he turned about and Captain Barnes objected saying he knew Jolly was going in the wrong direction. But Daniel insisted that Jolly's judgment had been good on other occasions and he could trust him. Jolly set out in a fast walk. It began to storm and thunder furiously. After they had gone quite a distance at about midnight they missed Range, and after a while they heard him barking. He did not like a storm, and during such times he would come to the door of the camp and bark until he was admitted. As soon as Jolly heard the dog bark he started out in a lope and soon reached camp. Grandma, fearing that they were lost, would not let Range in so that he would continue to bark and thereby assist the lost men to find the camp. Jolly went direct to camp and did not betray the trust placed in him.

Daniel Dean was a member of the Associate Presbyterian Church from early life. His wife Mrs. Jannett Dean was a member of the first Missionary Society organized in Greene County. Daniel Dean was an ardent abolitionist; he hated the institution of slavery and enjoyed the distinction of being the first member of that church who was ever arraigned before the session of the church for denouncing his minister for praying for the institution of slavery in which he gained a signal victory, and that same church still exists and prospers and is to be congratulated on being the first church in Greene County to hold a temperance meeting, all members attending, which resulted in a resolution that all members of that church thereafter refrain from the use of intoxicating liquor except in sheep washing and harvest time. This is amusing now, but the great benefit to the temperance cause as a result of that meeting cannot be estimated.

Daniel Dean died in 1842 at the age of 77 years. He was a man of worth, a respected citizen of his community and an upright Christian gentleman. His remains rest in the Dean Cemetery, by the side of his wife Jannett. A suitable monument marks the spot. He was a very liberal man in his dealings with his neighbors, exacting but what was right and just. In his will, which is on record in the Probate Court of this county, he requested that no suit should ever be brought against any person indebted to his estate, and this was fully carried out by his executors, John Bickett and Walter Parry, his two sons-in-law.


 

 

Name: Joseph  Newton Dean

Rank: Unknown

Company: B

Jerry Dean's great-grandfather, Joseph Newton Dean, was a son of Joseph and Hannah Boggs Dean on August 22, 1844, near Xenia (Greene County), Ohio. As a teenager, he enlisted in Co. B of the 40th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regm't. at Camp Chase (Franklin County) Ohio in December 1861. He fought with Gen. Garfield at the Battle of Prestonburg, KY, and participated in many other engagements including Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, the siege of Atlanta, Kennesaw, Franklin, Tenn., Jonesborough and Lovejoy Station. Of Irish Presbyterian stock (Tobermore, Ireland), his ancestor Daniel Dean (b. 10-20-1766) had migrated to Pennsylvania from Ulster in 1784. After 1790, he and his mother relocated to the Virginia Tideater, where Daniel wed Jannett Steele, and they ultimately settled near Mount Sterling, Kentucky. Fierce Covenanter Presbyterian abolitionists, the Deans 'voted with their feet' and relocated north, across the Ohio in 1812 into Greene County, Ohio. There, the Deans operated 2,000 acres of farmland on Cesar's Creek near Xenia. After son Joseph's unit mustered out at Nashville in 1864, he graduated first from Iron City Commercial College in Pittsburgh, then from Cincinnati Law School. He wed Lydia Cleaver, became a prominent attorney and probate judge, and the couple had a son, my grandfather, Walter Parry Dean, who became a lawyer. W. P. Dean, in turn, had two sons Walt and Joseph Edward, and two daughters, later Mrs. Dorothy Webb and Mrs. Katherine Stewart. J.W. and his Arkansas-born wife, nee Nola Beard, lived briefly in Concinnati, then in North Little Rock, Ark. where they had a daughter, Joana Jo Dean, and me, Walter Jeryl (Jerry) Dean. I now have two grown sons, David, 32, of Bloomington, Ind., and Daniel Wm., an architect with the former E. Fay Jones firm in Fayetteville, Ark. My wife Regina and I also have daughters Megan Katherine, 3-3-1992, and Amanda Elizabeth, 5-12-1994


 

From: SSanfordG@aol.com (by way of Nancy Trice <trice@usroots.com>)
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 1997 09:26:07 -0400
Subject: KY-F: Moores: Winchester, Ky

The follow in a copy of a letter  on file at the Library in
Winchester KY

Dr. Nathan Worth Brown
316 Michigan Street
Toledo, Ohio

                    September 30, 1930

Mr. George F. Doyle, Registrar,
         George Rogers Clark Chapter, S.A.R.,
              Winchester, KY

Dear Sir:

I hope you will not consider it an imposition if I make an inquiry regarding a very early resident of Winchester, Ky. My son-in-law, William Christian Moore, is descended from James Moore (1788-1845) who married Mary Campbell Dean (1795-1857), the daughter of Daniel Dean (1765-1843) and Jeannet Steele (1768-1841).  The latter came from Augusta County, Va.  James Moore was married in 1811 and came from Winchester or its vicinity to Greene County, Ohio in 1812.  James Moore had the following sons Samuel, James G., Daniel M., William Henry, and Thomas.  William Henry (1820-1890), the grand-father of my son-in-law, married Harriet Wilkerson b. 1827. James G. married Mary Sipe in 1834 and moved to Indiana.
Samuel married Rachel Ewing and went to Indiana.  I am, however, interested in the ancestry of James Moore (1788-1845) who came to Ohio from Ky.  There are several Moore families in that part of Kentucky and although I have examined many records I have been unable to ascertain to which the said James Moore belongs.  It is possible that in your chapter records you may have the information which I desire.  It may be that you can refer me to some other resident of Winchester who will have this information.  In either case I shall be under deep obligation to you for any effort you may make in my behalf.  I am extremely anxious to secure this information in order that my son-in-law may become a member of S.A.R.

With kind regards,

Sincerely yours,
(signature)
 N. Worth Brown


 

MIAMI TOWNSHIP Dills

J. D. Hawkins, merchant, Yellow Springs, was born in Maryland, April 25, 1832, and is a son of Abram and Anna (Kuhn) Hawkins, both natives of Maryland. They had a family of eight children, five of whom are living. The subject of this sketch came to Ohio in 1852, walking nearly all the way from Cumberland, Maryland, and after landing in Ohio, commenced working for Hon. Aaron Harlan, and cut and put up about three hundred cords of wood, the first winter in Ohio; he then worked in the warehouse of Stewart Brothers for one year, and on December 8, 1853, was married to Miss Louisa Baker, daughter of Isaac Baker, and niece of Brinton Baker, of Xenia, who bore him four children, all dying in 1863, within one week; their names were, Albert M., Anna E., Eddie W., and Harry. He enlisted in Company D, Captain Tully's Forty-Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel U. S. Gilbert, for three years, and was honorably discharged. Is a member of the Masonic order, and also of the Independent Order Odd Fellows. Voted the Democratic ticket in 1853-4-5; after that, when the Republican party was born, he has voted that ticket solid. Through his unswerving energy, faithfulness to business, and honest, square dealing, he has gained a reputation worthy the confidence and support of all good, honest people. He is now engaged in the dry goods business at Yellow Springs, and is doing his full share of the business of the place. Has filled the office of corporation treasurer for twelve years, and that of township treasurer for three years, and, in the writer's judgment, is today well qualified and worthy to fill any office in the county within the gift of the people.


Jim Carpenter, March 9, 2017

Leigh –

Hi.  I’m Jim Carpenter, the “cousin” that my cousin Yana referred to in her e-mail.  Yana and I have been collaborating for years on the Wiehle family tree.  Her Dad was sort of the Wiehle family historian and has quite a lot of paper documents from his research over the years; and I have a full access membership to Ancestry.com, so I have a lot of digital documentation.  Together, I think we make a pretty good team!

After Yana forwarded your e-mail to me, I looked at your website and so I am passing familiar with your Wiehle and Gebauer info.  Back in the early 2000s, Yana and I were only vaguely aware of the “Ohio Wiehles”, but, over time, I have managed to contact and share info with three or four of their descendants.  Frankly, in most cases I knew more about their ancestors than they did.  Part of that was due to Yana’s Dad having gone to Portsmouth, Ohio many years ago and gleaned some info from the Portsmouth UCC Church records (the German language “Lutheran” church (which is referred to as “Reformed” in Germany)).  The UCC Church is where Yana and my great-great grandfather (Rev Johann Gottlieb Wiehle) preached from 1852-1856.  As Yana noted, because there seemed to be so many Wiehles with the same names, we refer to him as “Rev Johann”.

While Yana and I now know quite a bit about the Ohio Wiehles, we know nothing about the Ohio Gebauers.  So, seeing your info on your great grandmother was an eye opener for me.  I had noted the “Gabauer” girls in previous searches on Ancestry.com, but did not have any connecting link and so have never entered them in my A.com db.  I have done that now, but, as so often seems to happen with the Ohio Wiehles, there are several pieces of info that don’t seem to track.  I hope that between the three of us we can resolve some of those apparent inconsistencies.  BUT, I do not intend to grapple with the whole tree at one time.  Rather, I want to deal with it one piece at a time, so, for this e-mail, I am going to focus on the roots in Germany.

Our family history says that Rev Johann (and his wife, Johanna Christiana Gebauer) went to the German language church in Portsmouth because he had “relatives” there (maybe his wife did, too?) – and that once he got there he called himself “George” because there was already another Johann Gottlieb Wiehle there and he wanted to avoid confusion.  Frankly, our research shows that there were TWO other Johann Gottliebs there, hence the need to use nicknames to tell them apart.  I have a photo of a headstone in a Scioto County cemetery that locates one “Yohn G” Wiehle (that’s the literal inscription).  Based on the info I got from the current Ohio Wiehles, Yana and I are convinced that Yohn G is Rev Johann’s father – and that the vast majority of Wiehles in Portsmouth at that time were half-brothers/sisters to Rev Johann (i.e., Yohn G’s children via Amelia Kocke).  BUT, there is an exception – Johann Gottlieb Wiehle #3.  Based on various records I have seen, he is referred to as “John G”, so that’s what we call him.

I have ASSUMED that John G MUST be related to Yohn G or why else would he be in Portsmouth?  So, I have ASSUMED that he is a nephew – i.e., he is a son of an unnamed brother of Yohn G’s.  Based on your website info, I am now going to make two other assumptions: Dorothea Wiehle Gebauer is a sister to John G and Albert Gebauer was a brother to Johanna Christiana Gebauer.  This is probably too tidy an assumption to be correct, but for now, it works since it explains a Portsmouth connection for all these people.

Our Wiehles were from the southern-central part of Silesia (note: the German word for this area is “Schlesien”, not Slazen).  Rev. Johann (and most of his half brothers/sisters) were born in the village of Kontschwitz.  At the time, Schlesien was a German state (it’s now part of Poland due to WW II) and Kontschwitz was located in the County (German = Kreis) of Ohlau (not Olan).  So, the Wiehles were from Kreis Ohlau.  I have to assume that the Gebauers lived nearby because back in those days people didn’t travel very far from their birthplaces.  So, I do not think that Dorothea Wiehle Gebauer was from Wurttemberg (Western Germany) because it is nowhere near Silesia (Eastern Germany).  Yes, the shipboard manifest says that’s where she came from, but that’s not necessarily her birth place.  It could just be some kind of civil registration used as a point of origination (Germans and their detailed documentation, you know).  And, I’m not convinced that this is “your” Dorothea because, where are Helen and Anna?  Why is Dorothea listed as “Gerhard” if she isn’t yet married to Mr. JG Gerhardt who lives in Ohio?  Names alone are tricky.  This manifest could actually show a Dorothea Gebhard from Wurttemberg who is not our gal.  I don’t know, but the association is shaky to me.  What would help here, Leigh, is if you had something in writing from your great grandmother that spells out some of this.

I’m going to digress here and talk about the attachment.  Yana’s email (I didn’t check this out myself) says you have Caroline Sohn being married to John G (Johann Gottlieb #3).  The attached shows she married Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt.  There goes all those %$#@! Johann Gottliebs again.  But, I’m not sure this is OUR JG Gerhardt.  More on that in another e-mail.

We’re leaving in ten minutes for my grandson’s 11th birthday party, so I’m going to stop there and let this sink in for a bit before I attempt to follow up.

Regards,

Jim

P.S. For Leigh.  From your website, I take it you live in Scottsdale.  I live in San Diego.  If you spend summers in Wisconsin, Yana and I both have ancestors there, too.


 

 

March 6, 2017

 
Hi, Yana.
 
My family history does reach back to Silesia, Prussia, through my great-great grandmother, Dorothea Wiehle, born about 1819 in Silesia, Prussia, and who married Albert Gebauer about 1842 in Silesia, Prussia. I do not know who her parents are.
 
My great grandmother, Helen Margaret Gebauer, was born October 7, 1845, in Olan, Silesia, Prussia.
 
Albert Gebauer died about 1855 in Prussia.

Augusta Pauline Louise (Wiehle) Gerhardt died May 10, 1856, in Portsmouth, Scioto Co., OH, at about age 33.

Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer (age 36) born in Wuttemberg, departed from Le Havre, France, aboard SS Admiral, and arrived November 14, 1856, in the Port of New York, NY.
 
The 1860 U. S. Census taken on August 1, 1860, shows Gotleib Gerhart (age 34) born in Prussia, and with personal estate of $300 is a Furnace Laborer, and is living in Vernon Twp., Scioto Co., OH. Living with him are: Dorothea Gerhart (age 41) born in Prussia; Helen Gabauer (age 15) born in Prussia; and Anna Gabauer (age 12) born in Prussia. This is Dorothea Gebauer, not Dorothea Gerhardt.
 
Johann Gottlieb Gerhardt Jr. and Dorothea (Wiehle) Gebauer were married January 2, 1863, in Lawrence Co., OH. Lawrence County, Ohio is adjacent to Scioto County, Ohio.
 
The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 5, 1870, shows Isaac Baker (age 62) born in Pennsylvania with real estate of $7,000 and personal estate of $870 is a Farmer and is living in Miami Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is Eliza Baker (age 61) born in Ohio, who is Keeping House. Also there are three children, all born in Ohio: Joseph Baker (age 26), a Journeyman Plasterer; Esther Baker (age 20), who is Helping Mother; and Charles Baker (age 15), who Works on the Farm.
 
My speculation:
 
Augusta Pauline Louise Weihle and Dorothea Weihle are closely related, probably cousins. When Augusta died in 1856 in Ohio, Dorothea, now a widow, traveled to Ohio to live with Augusta’s widower husband, Gottlieb Gerhardt. They married a few years later and had one child together.
 
These bits and pieces are shown on my Web site, but I have attempted to connect them. My family records are nonexistent, so I have used the internet and the family trees of others to try to make some sense out of it all. You are the only one that has communicated with me regarding these families, so I am relying upon you to better figure it all out.
 
Best wishes, and thanks for contacting me.
 
Leigh