Truman Fremont Abbey


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Edward Paul "Ed" Robert was born December 25, 1875, in Thibodaux, Lafourche Co., LA, and died June 29, 1912, in Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM Territory, at age 36. Buried in Westlawn Cemetery, Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX. He is the son of William Anthony Robert of Quebec, Canada, and Emily Eve Boudreau of Lafourche Parish, LA.

Alva Allison Franks was born July 7, 1889, in Dryden, Pecos Co., TX, and died September 4, 1919, in Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX, at age 30. Buried in Westlawn Cemetery, Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX. She is the daughter of Daniel Gandy Franks of Plum Creek, Caldwell Co., TX, and Alva Allison Thompson of Oak Island, Medina Co., TX. Cause of Death: Sarcoma.

Edward Paul "Ed" Robert and Alva Allison Franks were married February 12, 1909, in Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX.

Edward Paul "Ed" Robert and Alva Allison (Franks) Robert had one child:

  1. Daniel McBride Robert: Born July 19, 1910, in Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM; Died January 4, 2001, in Sun City, Maricopa Co., AZ (age 90). His ashes were scattered in the White Tank Mountain Regional Park, Maricopa Co., AZ. Married April 13, 1934, in El Paso, El Paso Co., TX, to Margaret Estelle Aderhold: Born February 1, 1909, in Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX; Died December 13, 2008, in Peoria, Maricopa Co., AZ, (age 99). Her ashes were scattered in the White Tank Mountain Regional Park, Maricopa Co., AZ.

Alva Allison (Franks) Robert then married Charles Truman (a/k/a Truman Fremont) Abbey.

Truman Fremont Abbey was born May 19, 1886, in Orion Twp., Richland Co., WI, and died July 23, 1977, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, at age 91. Buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. He is the son of William Searle Abbey of Hope Twp., Durham Co., Canada West, and Ida Elmira Blake of Orion Twp., Richland Co., WI.

Charles Truman "C. T." Abbey and Alva Allison (Franks) Robert were married March 6, 1916, at Christ Episcopal Church, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.

Charles Truman "C. T." Abbey and Alva Allison (Franks) (Robert) had no children.

Charles "C. T." Abbey then married Dollie Ola Evans, and he adopted Alva's son from a previous marriage, and the son's name was changed from Daniel McBride Robert to Dan Robert Abbey.

Dollie Ola Evans was born August 12, 1902, in Austin, Travis Co., TX, and died July 30, 1972, in the Santa Rosa Medical Center, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, at age 69. Buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. She is the daughter of Joseph Lawson Evans of Texas, and Frances Lee "Fannie" Hicks of Texas. Dollie O. Abbey had a sister, Ollie Mae Evans. Ollie Mae had gotten married to Vernon Eppler when Ollie was 16 years old, and she stayed married to Vernon until she was 26. Then she divorced Vernon and was unmarried until about 1956 when she remarried Vernon who had been married and divorced in the meantime. She and Vernon were happily married for a few years, and then he got cancer and died but Ollie stayed with him and took care of him until he died. Charles Truman "C. T." Abbey and Dollie Ola Evans were married December 27, 1924, in Tampico, Mexico.

Charles "C. T." Abbey and Dollie Ola (Evans) Abbey had no children.

Charles "C. T." Abbey and Dollie Ola (Evans) Abbey then adopted one child:

  1. Alana June Abbey: Born March 11, 1930, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX; Died August 29, 1984, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX (age 54). Buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Married November 22, 1952, at Christ Episcopal Church, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, to Albert Maverick McNeel Jr.: Born August 30, 1928, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.




TIMELINE


The Abbey/McNeel burial plots, Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


Truman Fremont (a/k/a Charles Truman) "C. T." Abbey is buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


Dollie Ola (Evans) Abbey is buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


   

Alana June (Abbey) McNeel is buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Left photo courtesy of Joyce and Dallas Dean Stratman, Caledonia, Kent Co., MI. Right photo courtesy of Find-A-Grave.


Ian Abbey McNeel is buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Photo courtesy of Joyce and Dallas Dean Stratman, Caledonia, Kent Co., MI.


Edward Paul "Ed" Robert was born December 25, 1875, in Thibodaux, Lafourche Co., LA.

Vernon Rufus Eppler was born January 30, 1894, in Enid, Garfield Co., OK.

Truman Fremont (a/k/a Charles Truman/C. T.) Abbey was born May 19, 1886, in Orion Twp., Richland Co., WI.

Alva Allison Franks was born July 7, 1889, in Dryden, Pecos Co., TX.


The Richland County Republican and Observer, Richland Center, Richland Co., WI, November 9, 1893

Following is the report of Oak Ridge school, district no. 5, town of Orion, for the term ending October 28, 1893:

First month - No. enrolled, 26; No. days taught, 19; whole No. days in attendance, 363; average daily attendance, 18; neither absent nor tardy, Kate and Jennie Kane, Emma Abbey, Ed. and Frank Sherman, Sarah and Austin Mc Claren; absent but not tarde, Ada Demmer, Tempest, Arthur, Oscar, Irvin, Rose, Ella and Bertha McClaren, Maud and Truman Abbey, Carrie Sherman, Fred Kellar and Willie Wilson.

Second month - No. enrolled, 19; No. days taught, 21; whole No. days in attendance, 342; average daily attendance, 16; neither absent nor tardy, Kate and Jennie Kane, Sarah, Austin and Ella McClaren, Ed. and Frank Sherman, Maud and Emma Abbey; absent but not tardy, Ada. Demmer, Art McClaren, Everett Miller, Leonard Frye and Dolly Wilson; tardy but not absent, Ralph and Jimmie Miller.

There are only 150 minutes lost by tardiness during the term and an average absence during the last month of 3. This speaks well for the punctuality and attendance and I can say that the deportment of the scholars was fully as good.   CHAS. HENRY, Teacher  


On the 1895 Plat of Orion Twp., Wm. Abbey is listed as the owner of 80 acres of land in the Eastern 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 17, T9N (Orion Twp.).

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 26, 1900, shows William Abbey (age 47) is a farm laborer born April 1853 in Canada of English and Canadian-born parents, and renting his home in Dodgeville, Dodgeville Twp., Iowa Co., WI. Living with him are his wife of twenty five years, Ida Abbey (age 48) born September 1858 in Wisconsin of Pennsylvania-born parents. All of their children (except for Iva who had married and Ruth who died) are living in the household in the city of Dodgeville, Iowa Co., WI. Irwin Abbey (age 24) born May 1876 is a traveling stationery salesman; Maude Abbey (age 18) born December 1881 is a dressmaker; Emma Abbey (age 16) born February 1884; Truman Abbey (age 14) born May 1886; Eda Abbey (age 5) born March 1895; and Allen Abbey (age 2) born June 1898. All of the children were born in Wisconsin.  

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 4, 1900 shows Lawson Evans (age 27) born August 1872 in Texas to Texas-born parents is a Policeman renting his own home and living at 611 Trinity Street, 9th Ward, City of Austin, Travis Co., TX. Living with him is his wife of 10 years, Fannie Evans (age 24) born September 1875 in Texas to Texas-born parents, with 4 of the 6 children born to her still alive. Also living there are his three children, all born in Texas to Texas-born parents: Rubie Evans (age 7) born February 1893; Rosie Evans (age 3) born July 1896; and Raymond Evans (age 2) born May 1898.

Dollie Ola Evans and Ollie Mae Evans (twins) were born August 12, 1902, in Austin, Travis Co., TX.


The Beach Advance, Beach, Billings Co., ND, October 30, 1908

Golden Valley News

(First publication October 30th)

Department of the interior U. S. Land Office at Dickinson, N. D., Oct. 27, 1908. Notice is hereby given that Charles T. Abbey of Alpha, N. D., who on June 6th, 1907, made homestead entry No. 9213, for the ne1/4 of section 10, township 137, range 104, w. 5th principal meridan, has filed notice of intention to make final commutation proof,, to establish claim to the land above described, before George McClellan, U. S. Commissioner at Beach,, N. D. on the 2nd of Dec. 1908. Claimant names as witnesses: Gust Burke, of Alpha, N. D., Nels Miller, Thomas P. Oulton, John A. Joeger, all of Sentinel Butte, N. Dak. S. M. FERRIS, Register.


Edward Paul "Ed" Robert and Alva Allison Franks were married February 12, 1909, in Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX.


Edward Paul "Ed" Robert and Alva Allison Franks Marriage Record.


On August 30, 1909, Charles T. Abbey received a Homestead Land Grant for 160 acres of land in Golden Valley Co., ND for the NE Qtr of Section 10, in Twp. No. 137N of Range 164 west of the Fifth Principal Meridian.


Golden Valley County History

Created from the western portion of Billings County by a favorable vote at the November 10 general election, although litigation delayed its official designation as a county until November 11, 1912. The name was probably chosen for the favorable image it projected although a Golden Valley Land and Cattle Co is known to have been a major land owner here in the early 1900's. Golden Valley County was established 11 Nov 1912 when voters chose to secede from Billings County. The name was after the fields of grass and wheat in the area.
County Seat: Beach
Area 1002 square miles.
2000 population -- 1,924.


The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 26, 1910 shows Ed P. Robert (age 34) born in Louisiana to Canadian and USA-born parents is a book keeper living in his own home in Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM. He is married to his wife of one year, Alba F. Robert (age 20) born in Texas of Texas-born parents. She is childless. 

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 18, 1910 shows Jos. Evans (age 31) born in Texas to Unknown and Mississippi-born parents is a City Work Driver in his second marriage renting his own home and living on State Street, 4th Ward, City of Austin, Travis Co., TX. Living with him is his wife of 18 years, Fannie Evans (age 35) born in Texas to English and Texas-born parents and in her second marriage, with 7 of the 9 children born to her still alive. Also living there are his seven children, all born in Texas to Texas-born parents: Ruby V. Evans (age 18) a Private Family Servant; Rosa Lee Evans (age 14) a Private Family Servant; Raymond Evans (age 13); Ola Evans (age 9); Ollie Evans (age 9); Pauline Evans (age 5); and Edna Evans (age 2).


The San Antonio Light and Gazette, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, Sunday, August 7, 1910

Additional Southwest Texas News

Mrs. D. G. Franks has returned from a month's stay in Las Cruces, N. M., where she went to visit her daughter, Mrs. E. P. Roberts.


On October 25, 1911, Chas. T. Abbey entered the United States from Mexico at Laredo, TX.


The Rio Grande Republican, Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM, Tuesday, May 28, 1912

Mrs. Ed Roberts is hostess to her brother Mr. Franks and his friend, Mr. Watkins, from their home in Texas.


Edward Paul "Ed" Robert.


Edward Paul "Ed" Robert died Saturday morning, June 29, 1912, in Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM, at age 36. Buried in Westlawn Cemetery, Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX.


The Rio Grande Republican, Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM, Tuesday, July 2, 1912

DEATH OF ED ROBERTS

The death of Ed Roberts shocked Las Cruces last Saturday morning coming as it did without warning. Mr. Roberts was preparing for his last days work previous to a long and needed vacation and was stricken in his own home in the presence of his wife and was gone from this life without a word or apparent knowledge of the approaching end. He had suffered for some years from a heart trouble but no immediate danger of death or even serious illness seemed imminent. He had for some time been in care of a physician and had frequently expressed a desire to go to a lower altitude for a rest. This was all planned when he passed away leaving his friends mourning over his sudden demise. He leaves a young wife and child, his beloved mother and a young brother as his immediate family and they are joined by a host of relatives and dear friends in their sorrow. The funeral was held from the pretty bungalow home recently built by the ambitious young man, at four on Sunday afternoon and was in charge of B. P. O. E. Lodge 1119, and the beautiful service with appropriate music by a quartette composed of Messrs W. J. and R. A. Stevens, Dr. Orrin H. Brown and Orrin A. Foster, was solemnly observed. The pall bearers were his working mates from the Bascom French company and were Mr. Frank Islas, Mr. George Schenk, Mr. H. B. Bundy, Mr. Jose Ruiz, Mr. J. B. Wooden and Mr. A. R. Ruiz. Mr. Poole being the funeral director. Beautiful flowers expressed the grief and sympathy of friends and covered the casket from sight. The procession from the residence to the depot was a very long one and the train soon bore away the remains of one who has come to Las Cruces for health and an extension of life which had truly been prolonged by his stay here, in a land he loved, amid beautiful surroundings and loving friends. Ed Roberts as he was known here was a most exemplary young man of correct habits and ideal ambitions. He was a loving son and husband and a highly esteemed citizen. His employers the Bascom-French company prized his loyal service and genuine sorrow is felt by every man there for the loss of this young man. His remains accompanied by his wife and child were sent to Del Rio, Texas for interment.


The Rio Grande Republican, Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM, Tuesday, July 9, 1912

THE FUNERAL OF ED ROBERTS

The Republican is in receipt of copies of the West Texas News and the Val Verde County Herald of Del Rio, Texas, containing accounts of the funeral of Ed Roberts and showing the high esteem in which he and his family are held in the old home of Mrs. Roberts. We take the following from the News which closes a long obituary and which was followed by the tribute paid by Mr. George W. Frenger, secretary of the Bascom-French Company and which was read at the funeral service of Mr. Roberts in his name here. "The interment took place at the Del Rio cemetery on yesterday morning and the funeral was conducted by the local Masonic Order. The beautiful and impressive services of that Order being followed in detail in paying the last respects to the dead brother. The floral offerings contributed by the many friends of the family were among the most beautiful ever witnessed at a funeral in this city and especially was this true of flor-tokens of love and affection placed upon the grave by his brothers in Masonry of Las Cruces, New Mexico. Homer, Louisiana, and Del Rio; by the Elks of Las Cruces and Del Rio and by his fellow workers of the Bascom-French Company. "The bereaved widow has the sympathy of the entire community and the high esteem in which the deceased was held was evidenced by the mountain of flowers under which he was laid to rest."


The Rio Grande Republican, Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM, Friday, July 19, 1912

Mrs. Ed. Roberts and her mother, Mrs. Franks, shipped the household goods and automobile of Mrs. Roberts to her mother's home in Del Rio, Texas, last week. Mrs. Roberts and little son Daniel will reside with her parents there. Her brother, young Mr. Franks, will remain here.


The Rio Grande Republican, Las Cruces, Dona Ana Co., NM, Friday, February 7, 1913

Mrs. Ed. Roberts came to Las Cruces Monday, from her home in Del Rio, Tex., and is visiting with former friends here.


Charles Truman "C. T." Abbey and Alva Allison (Franks) Robert were married March 6, 1916, at Christ Episcopal Church, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.


Charles Truman "C. T." Abbey and Alva Allison (Franks) Robert Marriage Record.


Vernon Rufus Eppler (age 22) and Ollie Mae Evans (age 14) were married November 19, 1916, in Travis Co., TX.

C. T. Abbey lived with his wife in Tampico until 1917. At that time he came out of Mexico and joined the American Army. Alva Abbey stayed in Tampico to run his construction business. Mr. Abbey was in an engineering regiment and was in New Jersey scheduled to be shipped overseas when the war ended in 1918. Mr. Abbey was there during the flu epidemic, and he said the people were dying in the fort or camp where he was, and that they would take them and put them in a warehouse where they were stacked up like cord wood because it was freezing cold. After the war Mr. Abbey went back to Tampico and took over running his business again.


On March 2, 1918, Charles Truman Abbey, living in Tampico, Mexico, applied for a passport. He states that he has lived in Mexico during the following periods: November 1912 to July 1913; Sept 1913 to April 1914; May 1914 to August 1915; and May 15, 1917 and after March 2, 1918.

   

The passport was issued on March 25, 1918.


On March 21, 1918, Alva Frank Abbey and son, Dan, entered the United States from Mexico at Laredo, TX.

   


On January 27, 1919, Charles T. Abbey, living in Sapulpa, OK, applied for a passport for up to two years living in Tampico, Mexico. He states that he had lived in Tampico, Mexico during the following periods: November 1912 to November 1915; and April 1916 to April 1918.

The passport was issued on February 4, 1919.


Alva Allison (Franks) (Robert) Abbey died September 4, 1919, in Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX, at age 30. Buried in Westlawn Cemetery, Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX. Cause of death was cancer of the spine.


Alva Allison (Franks) (Robert) Abbey is buried in Westlawn Cemetery, Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX.


After Alva died of cancer of the spine in 1919, and Mr. Abbey brought Dan, who was about 9 years old, up from Mexico to live with Dan's grandmother, Alva Franks, who had a little hotel (Franks Hotel) in Del Rio, where Dan eventually went to high school.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on March 3, 1920, shows Joseph M. Evans (age 42) born in Texas to Texas-born parents is a General Farm Farmer owing his own farm free of a mortgage and is living in Liberty Co., TX. Living with him is his son, Charles J. Evans (age 3) born in Texas to Texas-born parents.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on February 4, 1920, shows Vernon Eppler (age 26) born in Oklahoma to Texas-born parents is a Tool Dresser at an Oil Company who owns his own home and lives in Gorman Twp., Eastland Co., TX. Living with him is his wife Ollie Eppler (age 20) born in Texas to Texas-born parents. Also living there is Vernon's niece, Dorothy Evans (age 4) born in Texas to Texas-born parents.

Joseph Madison Evans died October 19, 1922, in Harris Co., TX.

Charles Truman "C. T." Abbey and Dollie Ola Evans were married December 27, 1924, in Tampico, Mexico.


The Mexican Certificate of Marriage for Charles Truman "C. T." Abbey and Dollie Ola Evans.


The Daily Northwestern, Oshkosh, WI, Friday, July 22, 1927

Waupaca, Wis. - C. T. Abbey, of San Antonio, Tex. and G. A. Abbey, of Haiti, spent Tuesday in the city guests of the Almo Larsen family.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, TX, Sunday, January 13, 1929

HAMMOND HEADS BEARS

San Antonio, Tex., Jan. 12. - H. H. Hammond was elected president of the San Antonio Bears, succeeding Harry Ables, who resigned several weeks ago, following the annual meeting of the stockholders, today. The following were elected board of directors: Dr. J. L. Burleson, H. H. Hammond, J. F. Armstrong, J. L. Yarbrough and C. T. Abbey. The directors elected officers as follows: H. H. Hammond, President and treasurer; Dr. J. H. Burleson, vice president; J. L. Yarbrough, secretary, and Tom E. Conner Jr., assistant secretary and business manager. Conner was placed in active charge of the club.


Alana June Abbey was born March 11, 1930, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.


Alana June Abbey Delayed Certificate of Birth Record, filed October 24, 1938. Please note that this birth record did not indicate that Alana June Abbey was adopted.


The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 16, 1930, shows Vernon R. Eppler (age 35) born in Oklahoma to Texas-born parents is an Oil Well Driller on an Oil Rig who was first married at age 34 who rents his home for $25 per month and lives in the Goldsboro Oil Field, Precinct 4, Coleman Co., TX. Living with him is his wife Ethel Eppler (age 22) born in Texas to Alabama and Texas-born parents who was first married at age 21.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 5, 1930, shows Charles T. Abbey (age 40) born in Wisconsin to Canadian-born parents and first married at age 35 is a Ranchman of a goat ranch with real property worth $25,000 owning his own home at 611 5th Street, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Living with him were his wife, Dollie Abbey (age 28) born in Texas to Texas-born parents and first married at age 23; and their daughter June R. Abbey (age 1/12) born in Texas to Wisconsin and Texas-born parents. Also living there was Dollie's sister, Dorothy D. Evans (age 15) born in Texas to Texas-born parents. There were also renters living in the building, a family of four.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 17, 1930 shows Charles J. Evans (age 13) born in Texas to Texas-born parents is a Boarder living in the Lettie Carter household, Liberty Co., TX.


The San Antonio Express, San Antonio, TX, Sunday, March 20, 1932

Two-Year-Old Has a Party

Alana June Abbey celebrated her second birthday anniversary last Saturday with a party at the home of her parents, Mr.. and Mrs. C. T. Abbey, 113 Jeffery Street. Various games were played and prizes awarded, after which refreshments were served. The lace-covered table was decorated with pink and white flowers and white rabbits, featuring an Easter motif, and the birthday cake was embossed with pink and white roses. Covers were marked for 25 guests. Assisting Mrs. Abbey in entertaining were Mesdames Grant Bechtel, Carlos Payne, Michael Cassidy and Miss Olive Eppler.


The 1940 U. S. Census taken on April 11, 1940, shows Charles Abbey (age 52) born in Wisconsin, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 4 years of High School, is a married President of a Beverage Company who owns his home worth $11,500 and is living in the City of San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX. Living with him are: his wife, Dolly Abbey (age 38) born in Texas, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 4 years of High School; and his daughter, June Abbey (age 3) born in Texas.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Friday, June 14, 1940

San Antonio society is undergoing a siege of parties. The June brides are still holding their own as to causing the majority of entertainment but visitors are close challengers. Mrs. Olive Eppler of Hollywood, Calif., visiting her brother and sister, Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Abbey, has been widely feted since her arrival two weeks ago. She will leave Tuesday. Mrs. Abbey honored her sister with a coffee Thursday morning of last week and the next day, Mrs. Grant Bechtel gave a luncheon at her home for Mrs. Eppler.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Sunday, June 16, 1940

Mike and Ike look alike, all right, but Mrs. C. T. Abbey and her identical twin sister, Mrs. Olive Eppler of Hollywood, Calif., are so indistinguishable that even their father can't tell them apart. And they're getting a laugh, since Mrs. Eppler has come to visit, out of their amazed San Antonio friends and their trouble with double vision.


The WWII Draft Registration Report taken on April 27, 1942, shows Charles Truman Abbey, age 55, born May 19, 1886, in Richland Center, WI, is living at 1619 West Gramercy Place, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.


   

Charles Truman Abbey's WWII Draft Registration Report.


Vernon Eppler, Houston, TX, and Mrs. Olive Mae "Ollie" (Evans) Eppler, San Antonio and Bakersfield, CA, were remarried  August 26, 1955, in Houston, Travis Co., TX.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Friday, September 23, 1955

Epplers In Houston

Mrs. Ollie Eppler, San Antonio and Bakersfield, Calif., and Vernon Eppler, Houston, were married Aug. 26 in Houston and are now making their home at 2149 Kipling in that city. Mrs. Eppler is the twin sister of Mrs. Charles T. Abbey and is also a sister of Mrs. Walter M. Embrey, San Antonio.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Tuesday, December 17, 1957

Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Abbey and their daughter, Mrs. Albert McNeel jr., and Mr. McNeel will take part in the gala Christmas holidays celebrated in Mexico City. They left by car Wednesday and will return before New Year's. They'll be house guests of Mr. Abbey's brother, Glen Allen Abbey. The Grant Bechtels gave them a "bon voyage" dinner party before they left.


Vernon Rufus Eppler died January 7, 1958, at M. D. Anderson Tumor Institute, Houston,  Harris Co., TX, at age 63. He had liver cancer and had been a Commercial Fisherman. He was born January 30, 1894, in Enid, Garfield Co., OK, to John Quitman Eppler and Mary Elizabeth Layton. Buried in Forest Park Cemetery. He had married Ethel O. Jones in 1914.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Sunday, December 4, 1960

Abbeys in Arkansas

While Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Abbey are spending two weeks in Hot Springs, Ark., her sister, Mrs. Olive Eppler, is staying in their home. They left Nov. 26. Mr. Abbey's brother, Glenn Allen Abbey, Mexico City, will arrive Dec. 10 to spend the Christmas holidays. He will be the house guest of his niece, Mrs. Albert McNeel jr., and Mr. McNeel.


Dollie Ola (Evans) Abbey died July 30, 1972, in the Santa Rosa Medical Center, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, at age 69.


Dollie Ola (Evans) Abbey is buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Monday, July 31, 1972

Rites Set for Civic Leader

Services for Mrs. Dollie Evans Abbey, 69, of 2420 McCullough, will be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday at Porter Loring Georgian Chapel. Interment for Mrs. Abbey, who died Sunday, will be in Mission Burial Park. A San Antonio resident for 45 years, she was a member of the Conservation Society, Battle of Flowers Association, Military Civilian Club, and Christ Episcopal Church. She is survived by her husband, Charles T. Abbey; daughter, Mrs. June McNeel; sisters, Mrs. Edna Kuentcel, Palm Springs, Calif., Mrs. Ollie Eppler and Mrs. Dorothy Embrey, both of San Antonio; brothers, Raymond Evans, Houston, and Homer Evans, Westmoreland, Calif., and two grandchildren.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Monday, July 31, 1972

ABBEY

Mrs. Dollie Evans Abbey, age 69, of 2420 McCullough, died Sunday at a local hospital. She was a member of Christ Episcopal Church, the Conservation Society, Battle of Flowers Association and Military Civilian Club. Survivors: Husband, Charles T. Abbey; daughter, Mrs. June Abbey McNeel; sisters,  Mrs. Ollie Eppler, Mrs. Dorothy Embrey, all of San Antonio, Mrs. Edna Kuentcef, Palm Springs, Calif.; brothers, Raymond Evans, Houston; Homer Evans, Westmoreland, Calif.; and 2 grandchildren, Ian and Shelby McNeel. Services Tuesday at 1 o'clock in the Georgian Chapel of the Porter Loring Mortuary, the Rev. William E. Morgan officiating. Pallbearers; W. G. Bechtel Jr., Bruce Embrey, Walter M. Embrey Jr., Tim Word, R. A. Harman Jr., M. E. Lasswell. Honorary pallbearers: Ocon Word, M.A. Cassiday, Charles F. Guenther Jr., H. A. Pagenkopf, Dr. Elmer E. Cooper, Dr. Arnold Walder, W. E. Vincent, Albert M. NcNeel Sr., Robert Ancira. Interment in Mission Burial Park. Arrangements with PORTER LORING, McCulluogh at Elmira.


Truman Fremont (a/k/a Charles Truman) "C. T." Abbey died July 23, 1977, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, at age 91. Buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.


The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, TX, Monday, July 25, 1977

ABBEY

Charles T. Abbey, 93, 1707 Broadway, died Saturday, July 23, 1977. He was formerly president of the Delaware Punch Co. of America for 36 years; member of San Antonio Rotary Club, Tampicaria Club, Argyle Club and served in the U. S. Army in WWI. Survivors: Son, Dan R. Abbey, Phoenix, Ariz.; daughter, Mrs. Albert (June) Mcneel, San Antonio; sisters, Mrs. Emma Jane Larson, Mrs. Maude Stratman, both of Waupaca, Wis.; Grandsons, Dan R. Abbey Jr., Jon Abbey, both of Virginia; Ian Abbey Mcneel; granddaughter  Shelby Mcneel, both of San Antonio. Service Tuesday at 11 o'clock in the Georgian Chapel of Porter Loring Mortuary, the Rev. John J. Mac Naughton officiating. Pallbearers: Walter M. Embrey Jr., Bruce Embrey, Tim D. Ward, Edward R. Finch, Jr., W. B. Matthews, W. Armour Ball. Honorary pallbearers: Robert Antira, Ernest Ancira Sr., Paul A. Suess, Dr. Arnold I. Walter, Sam L. Kane, H. A. Papenkoph, Clifford E. Kuentrel, Walter M. Embrey Sr., Bill Bechist, Dr. August F. Meril Jr., Judge T. Armour Ball, William T. Chumney Jr., Dr. J. B. Morrison, Dr. Frank M. Douglas. Interment in Mission Burial Park. Arrangements with Porter Loring, 1101 McCULLOUGH 227-8221


Ollie Mae (Evans) (Eppler) Eppler died January 26, 1983, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, at age 80. Buried in Mission Burial Park South, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX.

Dorothy D. Evans was born July 9, 1916, and died February 12, 1990, in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, at age 73. Married to Walter Moseley Embrey.


San Antonio Express-News, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, December 2, 2007

Ilse "Ita" Herff Frost Garrett McNeel, 77, was known for optimism, reaching out to others

Ilse "Ita" Herff Frost Garrett McNeel, 77, the great-granddaughter of Dr. Ferdinand Herff, founder of Santa Rosa Hospital, and the great-granddaughter of Col. T.C. Frost, founder of Frost National Bank, died Friday of cancer. When McNeel's friends and family gather Monday for her memorial service, they will celebrate her life by reading and singing verses she underlined in her dog-eared Bible. "All that we're going to use is something she had known and loved in life," said her only sibling, Tom Frost, 80. He said his sister always reached out to help others. She was a homemaker and dedicated parishioner of Christ Episcopal Church. McNeel is remembered most for her optimistic take on life, her friends said. "She could take the worst situation you've ever seen and tell you how lovely it was and that it would turn out to be just fine," said Nell Herff, McNeel's childhood friend. "We'll all miss her terribly." Herff said McNeel often took care of her grandchildren. McNeel and her husband, Albert McNeel Jr., were both widowed when they married 22 years ago. Ita McNeel attended Saint Mary's Hall in San Antonio, Fairfax Hall in Waynesboro, Va., the Ogontz School in Philadelphia and the University of Texas at Austin. She was a member of the Junior League of San Antonio, Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority and the San Antonio Country Club. Laura Anne Gibson, a nurse at Brighton Gardens on Basse Road, said McNeel only lived at the retirement home for a couple months but made her mark there. "She will be missed," Gibson said. "She was very loving, caring and warmhearted ... a very Christian woman who was very close to her faith. She always asked about how everyone else was doing, always concerned about others." Gibson said McNeel made no secret about whom she held closest to her heart. "She loved and talked about her grandkids all the time," Gibson said. "And she called her husband her sweetheart." nmartinez@express-news.net


Ilse 'Ita' Herff Frost Garrett McNeel

Born: Feb. 22, 1930

Died: Nov. 30, 2007

Survived by: Her husband, Albert Maverick McNeel Jr.; her brother and sister-in-law, Tom and Pat Frost; her daughters, Ilse Garrett Hummel and husband PJ and Shelby McNeel Neuhmann and husband Kyle; her son-in-law, Steve Prosk and wife Cathy; her daughter-in-law, Kay McNeel Barclay and husband Andy; 11 grandchildren; and numerous nephews and nieces. Services: Visitation will be today from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Porter Loring at 1101 McCullough Ave. Memorial service will be Monday at 11 a.m. at Christ Episcopal Church at 510 Belknap Place.


Mrs. Birdie Embrey filed for divorce from J. A. Embrey in October 1932 in San Antonio.

 

    Muggsie Abbey 12/12/2003

Val Verde Co., TX - Cemeteries - Westlawn Cemetery (A-M surnames)
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This file was contributed for use in the USGenWeb
Archives by:  John M. Longoria, johnl@webnology.com

Copyright.  All rights reserved.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
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Westlawn Cemetery, Del Rio, Texas
A thru M by surname
Compiled by John M. Longoria, johnl@webnology.com

1st column:        LAST NAME
2nd column         FIRST NAME
3rd column         MIDDLE NAME
4th column         DATE OF BIRTH
5th column         DATE OF DEATH
6th column         INSCRIPTION

Abbey             Alva            Franks         1889              1919
 

Views of Truman Fremont (Charles Truman) Abbey

JPG Abbey CT HS.jpg (119847 bytes)    JPG_Abbey_CT_Baseball.jpg (133399 bytes)    JPG_Truman_Almo.jpg (182464 bytes)

Shown above: C. T. Abbey about 1904; C. T. Abbey Baseball Team; C. T. Abbey and Almo Larson, about 1910

JPG_Abbey_Almo_Roy.jpg (156061 bytes)    JPG Abbey CT Car.jpg (130957 bytes)    JPG Abbey CT 90 Head3.jpg (37986 bytes)

Shown above: At Waupaca, WI; Abbey gathering about 1924; C. T. Abbey at his 90th birthday party in San Antonio, TX 

JPG Abbey Alva.jpg (127859 bytes)        JPG_Truman_June.jpg (179579 bytes)    JPG Abbey Dan Head.jpg (98079 bytes)

Shown above: Alva Franks Robert Abbey; C. T. Abbey; Dollie Evans Abbey; June Abbey McNeel; Dan Robert Abbey


Ruth and Bill Larson; Shelby, Ian and June (Abbey) McNeel, C. T. Abbey

Watertown, Jefferson Co., WI, about 1976


HISTORY OF TRUMAN FREMONT ABBEY 

(a/k/a CHARLES TRUMAN ABBEY) 

Edited reflections of Atty. Albert M. McNeel, Jr. - Son-in-law of C. T. Abbey

C. T. Abbey was born in Richland Center, Wisconsin in 1886. When he was two or three years old the family moved to Dodgeville, Wisconsin where he grew up and graduated from high school about 1905. His parents named him Truman Fremont Abbey, but he did not like the name Fremont. Soon after graduation he changed his name to Charles Truman Abbey. Apparently he didn't like the name Fremont because when he was growing up General Fremont was not popular in Wisconsin, probably because of being too friendly with the Indians. Mr. Abbey was always a very conservative Republican. When Harry Truman became President, Mr. Abbey was not at all in tune with Mr. Truman being a Democrat and again he was probably unhappy with his name, although he never said anything about it.

C. T. Abbey's father, William Searle Abbey, was born in Canada and thus was a British subject. While C. T. had dual Canadian and United States citizenship, C. T. considered himself to be an American because his father came to the United States at age 7 or 8. C. T.’s mother was Ida Elmira Blake and her family came from Pennsylvania. C. T. thought she was Pennsylvania Dutch, but Glenn Abbey said they were actually Huguenot French.

William S. Abbey was always a tenant farmer and perhaps raised horses. One time when C. T. Abbey was a teenager his father had him take some horses to Madison, Wisconsin for delivery to Mr. LaFollette who was then, or later became, a very well known United States Senator from the State of Wisconsin. C. T. Abbey had a very long and colorful life. He said that when he was six years old his father rented a mule to a neighbor for $5.00 a month and he rented Mr. Abbey to lead the mule for $1.00 a month. When C. T. Abbey was a boy about 13 or 14 years old, he cut up many cords of firewood until he finally had enough money to buy a shotgun. He got $.25 a cord for cutting up a cord of wood. He said the first time he had the shotgun the snow was on the ground and he knew there was a rabbit under a large pile of brush so he went and jumped up and down on top of the pile of brush and finally the rabbit ran out, and he shot at the rabbit. But when he did, the barrel of his gun split apart because when he was jumping up and down he wasn't paying attention, and he got snow in the barrel of his gun which blocked it and made it explode so that all of his work in cutting all that wood was for naught.

The story of the family is that when C. T. Abbey was a baby his parents went to town and left him in the charge of his older brother and sisters and that when his parents returned they saw that the older children were pulling something up on a rope of a tree limb and then letting it fall almost to the ground. It was a game and when his parents got home they found that what they were letting fall was C. T. Abbey. They had him in a crib, and they were playing with him.

C. T. Abbey said when the snow got to be high he would ski to school and he could ski over the fences. He also apparently had an iceboat where he had some type of skis on a frame and a sail and could go sailing on the frozen lakes. Mr. Abbey always had a wonderful physique and by the time he was about 16 years old he weighed about 190 lb. Mr. Abbey was about 5'10" in height. He said that was very large for that time and that anybody that was bigger than that was usually very clumsy and not athletic. Mr. Abbey played all sports but especially liked football and baseball. Platteville, one of the towns near Dodgeville was a lead mining center. Sometimes Mr. Abbey and the rest of the baseball team would walk over 10 miles to Platteville and play baseball and then walk back home again.

C. T. Abbey got an appointment to West Point after he graduated from high school but apparently was not old enough to accept the appointment. He went out to North Dakota and for two years was a cowboy. Part of that time, at least, he was in a cabin out on the prairie all by himself. He saw the Northern Lights many times, sometimes parallel to the ground and would come just like a big tube of light along the ground. While he was a cowboy he participated in two roundups. At that time (1905 -1907) there were no fences and the roundup would begin with cowboys like Mr. Abbey going out and rounding up all the cattle they could find and bringing them in to camp. The cattle would be sorted out by different brands and the brands from their ranch stayed there. Evidently the other brands were taken forward and dropped off at wherever they belonged. Mr. Abbey said that the sun came up about 4:00 a.m. and went down about 10:00 p.m. They would get up, have breakfast, and then roundup until noon when they would come back to headquarters (that is to the chuck wagon). They would get a new horse, eat lunch, and then go rounding up again until about 9:00 p.m. The trail boss when he was on the roundup was named Favor, and was from Texas. There were some terrific cowboys on the roundup. Some of the older cowboys would never go to sleep at night, and would sit and talk and play poker. I guess they slept in the saddle some times during the daytime. The roundup he was on apparently went for about 300 miles and crossed the Little Missouri River. He said most of the cowboys swam across the river with their horses, but that there was one man that had taught his horse how to walk on the railroad trestle and he would walk his horse across. Mr. Abbey said some of the older cowboys could rope a calf over a cow.

While Mr. Abbey was a cowboy he got a second appointment to West Point but it did not reach him until the time for acceptance had expired. Apparently he never got another opportunity for an appointment. About this time C. T. Abbey went to Oklahoma to work for his brother, Erwin, drilling oil wells. Several years earlier Erwin had shot a man and thought that he had killed him, so he fled and for a long time the family did not know where he was. Erwin would send post cards back to the family and say that he was OK, but would not tell them where he was because he thought that the law was after him. It turned out that the man didn't die, so Erwin eventually contacted the family and it was after that time that Mr. Abbey went down to work for him. This must have been about 1907 or 1908. Glenn Abbey said he remembered seeing Erwin only two times in his life; his parents’ 30th and 50th wedding anniversary family reunions.

C. T. Abbey was the principal of an Indian school in Oklahoma at one point, and slept in a dormitory where they had Indian girls and Indian boys. He said the Indian boys had a big room on one side and the girls on another, and Mr. Abbey slept in a room in the middle between them in the middle of the dormitory. It is unknown how long he was the principal of the school, but he greatly admired the physical ability of the Indians. He said they were wonderful athletes, and apparently enjoyed his stay there very much.

At some time in Oklahoma while he was working on a well, the gas coming out of the well caught on fire and burned his hands and face. Apparently it was a second‑degree burn because he recovered but after that he always said the skin on his face was a little more sensitive than it had been before. After this Mr. Abbey went down to the San Antonio area to work for somebody drilling water wells (perhaps for his brother Erwin). At one point around San Antonio he was employed to go with a crew out on the Devils River north of Comstock to drill for oil, but the man that he was working for apparently had a disagreement with the landowner and they never did start working on the well but came back to San Antonio.

About 1911 Mr. Abbey started to go to Mexico but he apparently got typhoid fever, and he ended up at the Lutheran TB Sanitarium in San Antonio. He stayed there a little while, and then he started for Mexico again, and he had a relapse and the last thing he remembered was checking in to the P&S Hospital in San Antonio, and the nurse asked him if he had a doctor, and he said he didn't, and he would like her to get him a doctor. She got Albert McNeel’s grandfather, Dr. E. W. McCamish. Grandpa McCamish not only took care of Mr. Abbey, they became good friends. One thing that they had in common was baseball. Both of them liked baseball. Mr. Abbey said that Grandpa took him over to the Palace Theater which was, perhaps, on Alamo Plaza, to watch a game of the World Series. Apparently the movie house had a set up so that the telegraph operator would receive what was going on in the game and then they would punch buttons and make lights go on on the screen so if Babe Ruth hit a fly to right field that would be on the screen, and I don't know how they told them who was doing what, but anyway Mr. Abbey remembered that with great pleasure.

Then in 1911 Mr. Abbey went to Tampico, Mexico to work in the oil fields, perhaps with Grover and Donald Fricks (whom he knew from Texas and Oklahoma). Before he went he became a friend of Mr. Charles F. Ginther, Jr. who was a young lawyer, and Mr. Guenther from that time on and Mr. Abbey were the closest of friends, and Mr. Guenther was always his lawyer. Mr. Abbey got down to Mexico. He began a construction company building roads, bridges and derricks. He would work himself, and the story from him and other people is that he would often work a day and a night and a day and then he would sleep a night. Mr. Abbey was a very strong person. In mid life his arm was just like the wall, and he continued to be very strong until the day he died at age 91. They would build the derricks approximately 80' to 100' high, and they had big 2" x 12"s that came across as cross pieces every 8'. There were also guy wires extending from the ground to the top of the derrick. Mr. Abbey said there were three ways to get down off the top of the derrick. One was to climb down a ladder inside which was safe. Another one was to just start dropping from one cross piece to another. You'd let go and then you'd grab on to the next crosspiece. Another one was to grab on to the guy wire and just slide down and turn loose before you got to the end because at the end they folded the guy wire back, and the end of the guy wire, which was a steel cable, was sticking up, and if you ran into that it would punch holes in your hand. Mr. Abbey said that he always perspired down to the tops of his shoes but that his feet never perspired.

While he was in Mexico he evidently picked up malaria because he had malaria off and on all of his life. He was in Mexico during the Mexican Revolution, and many times he would be working in between two different groups that were fighting each other. He had a partner and it seemed that often his partner would be robbed on his way back from town with the payroll. They apparently always got the payroll in gold. Mr. Abbey was never robbed when he went in and out of town.

Mr. Abbey was in Mexico with a lot of people who later moved to San Antonio. One was Mr. Strauder Nelson who was a friend of Mr. Abbeys, Luke Gilliam was a friend, Mr. Luke Gilliam's brother, Arch, was a friend, Browney Bird and Dick Bird were friends of his, and their sister married Mr. William Cavender of the Cavender Oldsmobile in San Antonio. Another friend was Mr. Sam Kone and, of course, Mr. Adlai Harmon was a good friend of Mr. Abbey's.

In 1915 Mr. Abbey married Alva Franks Robert at Christ Episcopal Church, and I have a copy of the church records showing that. This lady had a son named Daniel McBride Robert from her first marriage and Dan, at that time, was about 5 years old. Mr. Abbey adopted Dan, and his name was changed to Dan Robert Abbey. Dan Abbey retired in Sun City, Arizona with his wife, Margaret (Muggsie), who was born Margaret Aderhold. Her father was a judge in Del Rio, Texas and she has a nephew, Jim Aderhold, living in San Antonio. Mr. Dan Abbey and Margaret have two sons, Dan, Jr. and Jon Abbey.

C. T. Abbey lived with his wife in Tampico until 1917. At that time he came out of Mexico and joined the American Army. Alva Abbey stayed in Tampico to run his construction business. Mr. Abbey was in an engineering regiment and was in New Jersey scheduled to be shipped overseas when the war ended in 1918. Mr. Abbey was there during the flu epidemic, and he said the people were dying in the fort or camp where he was, and that they would take them and put them in a warehouse where they were stacked up like cord wood because it was freezing cold. After the war Mr. Abbey went back to Tampico and took over running his business again.

About this time there was a company that wanted to build a drilling platform out in the Laguna Madre, and Mr. Abbey took the contract. The contract provided that he would get a big bonus if he finished early and a penalty if he finished late. Of course, Mr. Abbey finished early and made a lot of extra money on the job. He said that at one point he fell off the platform with a sledgehammer in his hand, and he fought his way back up to the surface and they pulled him out, and he didn't let go of the sledgehammer. However, Mr. Abbey was never able to swim. He said that whenever he got in water he sank and evidently his bones were unusually heavy.

With additional reference to his physical characteristics, he had a tooth beyond his wisdom tooth on each side. June always thought that this was unusual and that he had maybe some genes that went back further than most people, but this was just kind of a joke because he had those extra teeth behind his wisdom teeth.

About 1921 or 1922 (In 1919) Alva died of cancer of the spine and Mr. Abbey then brought Dan, who was about 12 (9) years, up (from Mexico) to live with Dan's grandmother Alva Franks who had a little hotel (Franks Hotel) in Del Rio, where Dan went to high school.

Mr. Abbey was almost always out in the brush constructing something or working on an oil well, but he was very well known to all of the British and American people that worked for the oil companies in Tampico. Another one of his friends was Mr. Burch Cochran, and Burch Cochran stayed in Tampico even after the expropriation and later had a Delaware Punch bottling plant and was very prominent and highly respected man in Mexico and also in San Antonio. A lot of the people that did business in Tampico also did business with the Frost National Bank in San Antonio because it was convenient and because they were known at the Frost Bank.

About 1924 Mr. Abbey was visiting a friend at the TB hospital in San Angelo, Texas where Dollie Evans was a nurse. She was a very beautiful girl, and she and Mr. Abbey were attracted to each other. Some of his friends or her friends persuaded her to go down and visit in Tampico, and I think it was about Christmas time in 1924 when they got married. Mrs. Abbey lived in the oil company camp, which was across the Pannuco River from Tampico. The oil companies had a separate camp because the bandits were always coming in to Tampico. One time she and Mrs. Harmon, I think, were in Tampico when people began yelling that the banditos were coming so Mrs. Abbey and her friend rushed in a store but it was a hardware store where they sold ammunition, and the man told them, said "Get out of here because this is the first place they come to get ammunition.".

About 1926 or 1927 C. T. and Dollie Abbey moved to San Antonio and lived in an apartment over near Mark Twain High School. It could have been 1928 or 1929, but it was more likely 1927 or 1928. Mr. Abbey made some investments. He bought a farm up near San Marcos on which they had a spring called Jacobs Well. He also bought about 1,200 acres up near Medina, Texas on what was called Honey Creek, one of the headwaters of the Medina River.

Mr. Abbey also did some contracting and some investing. Evidently when Mr. Abbey came out of Mexico he had sold his business and had sold some mineral interests that he had. It is unknown how much money Mr. Abbey had when he came out of Mexico but it is believed to have been several hundred thousand dollars if not more because he planned to take it easy and have a good living off of his income, perhaps using the money to do some contracting or ranching.

When the depression came Mr. Abbey probably lost some money, but was really not in debt. About this time the Delaware Punch Company, which was the parent company that owned the formula and made the concentrate, was in San Antonio, and the man that had promoted this lost control of the company. It was put in a trusteeship, and Mr. Abbey was appointed to run the company. Mr. Abbey took over the job and in due course the company came out of trusteeship, and Mr. Abbey bought some stock in the company, and he also got his friend, Mr. Adlai Harmon, to buy a substantial amount of stock so that Mr. Abbey and Mr. Harmon together probably had 51% of the company. When Mr. Abbey took over the company the stock had practically no market value and he and Mr. Harmon bought their stock for about $.25 a share. The man that had promoted the company had offended a lot of the bottlers, and when Mr. Abbey would contact the bottlers a lot of them would not want to see him when they heard that he was the President of the Delaware Punch Company. But soon he turned this around because Mr. Abbey was a very good businessman and was well liked by everyone. He drove in his car from coast to coast all the time for many years and apparently by about 1938 the Delaware Punch Company stock was selling for about $.50 a share, and then by 1941 it was probably selling for $1.00 a share. The stock was closely held, and it paid a pretty good dividend. By 1950 Delaware stock was selling for $30.00 a share and paying a $1.00 a year dividend.

Mr. Abbey, during World War II, would not use anything but the original formula which required sugar, but he during the war associated with Mr. Robert Ancira because Robert had a sister named Blanca who worked for Mr. Abbey, and Mr. Abbey thought a lot of Blanca. Mr. Abbey had the Delaware Punch Company give a concession to make and sell Delaware Punch in Mexico to Mr. Robert Ancira, and Mr. Abbey and Mr. Ancira began a long and very close friendship. About twice a year Mr. Abbey would go to Mexico City to make the concentrate there so that they could make the syrup, and they sold the syrup to the bottlers to make Delaware Punch. This became a very successful part of Delaware Punch and continued to be very successful until Mr. Abbey retired from the company and sold his stock. Mr. Ancira lived on for many years after that dying in about 1998, at which time he probably had already gotten out of the Delaware Punch business himself.

Mr. and Mrs. Abbey were very close friends of Mr. and Mrs. Grant Bechtel that was Grant and Helen Bechtel and began going to the Travis Park Methodist Church. Later Mr. and Mrs. Harmon, that is Ben and Adlai Harmon, moved to San Antonio. Mrs. Harmon was a big Episcopalian, and she got Mrs. Abbey to start going to Christ Episcopal Church. Mrs. Abbey became very active at Christ Episcopal Church and was active there as long as she lived. Mr. Abbey did not go to church except on occasions such as marriages or funerals. Mr. Abbey had indicated that he had never been baptized.

Mr. Abbey joined the San Antonio Rotary Club in the 1930s and he was always very active in the Rotary Club up until the time that he died, and Mrs. Abbey was active in the Rotaryannes all this time.

In 1930 C. T. and Dollie Abbey adopted June and named her Alana June Abbey. They loved June very dearly and they had a wonderful family. Mr. Abbey at some time in the 1930s sold the Jacobs Well property, but it must have been late in the 1930s because June remembered going there. Then after that he also sold the Honey Creek Ranch and built a house on West Kings Highway right near Kampmann Blvd. and Thomas Jefferson High School. Unfortunately this house was built over some kind of a fault and had a lot of foundation problems so during the war Mr. Abbey had an opportunity to sell the house which he did. All during the war Mr. and Mrs. Abbey and June rented a house on Huisache at North Main Avenue. June had started in the first couple of grades at St. Mary's Hall and then Mrs. Abbey, probably when they moved on West Kings Highway, moved her to Woodlawn Terrace where she went for several years and then she went back to St. Mary's Hall and went there until she graduated in 1948. After graduating from St. Mary's Hall, June went to Sweetbriar College in Lynchburg, Virginia for two years. June was a very fine student and always did very well in school. Then she went to the University of Texas where she was a Kappa Kappa Gamma graduating in 1951.

Mr. Abbey loved his friends, and he loved to play pitch and have a party, and he always would drink but he never became intoxicated to anyone's knowledge. He apparently had a great capacity for liquor, although no one ever knew him to have more than one or two drinks, and it is believed that he never did drink very much. Mr. Abbey would never have wanted to get to where he didn't know what he was doing.

Mr. Abbey had many adventures in Mexico and knew lots of people. One of the people he knew was a fellow named Monte Michels. Monte had worked for one of the big oil companies and had gotten mad at them and fallen out with them, and he quit and he became a bandit and began robbing the oil company payrolls when he could. Eventually somebody killed Monte Michels but he had been a friend of Mr. Abbey's, and even after he became a bandit he was friendly with Mr. Abbey. At one time he came into the camp where Mr. Abbey was with Monte's bandit gang but they didn't cause Mr. Abbey any trouble. Mr. Abbey said that coming from the border to Monterrey during the revolution they would hang people by their neck but that going south from Monterrey to Tampico they would hang them by their feet. Evidently if people are hung by their feet long enough the blood rushes to their head and kills them. One time Mr. Abbey started in a Dodge automobile to drive from Tampico to San Antonio but he broke an axle. They had the axle fixed and drove along a little further. The axle broke again so he just put the car on a flat car and shipped it up to San Antonio to have it repaired. Mr. Abbey would come out of Mexico almost every year in the summer time and often come to San Antonio and buy an automobile and then drive to St. Louis and Chicago and see the baseball games. Then he would drive up to Dodgeville and see his parents or go to a family reunion, and then he would come back to San Antonio and sell the car, and probably ride the train back to Tampico and stay there for the next year. June remembers going to some family reunions up at Dodgeville or at Eau Claire.

Mr. Abbey's sister, Edna, married Mr. Louis Anderson who lived at Eau Claire, and Edna, although she was the youngest daughter, was kind of the leader of the family along with Emma Jane.

Dollie O. Abbey had a sister, Ollie Mae Evans. Ollie Mae had gotten married to Vernon Eppler when Ollie was 16 years old, and she stayed married to Vernon until she was 26. Then she divorced Vernon and was unmarried until about 1956 when she remarried Vernon who had been married and divorced in the meantime. She and Vernon were happily married for a few years, and then he got cancer and died but Ollie stayed with him and took care of him until he died. Right after Dollie married Mr. Abbey he took her up to Wisconsin to a family reunion, and he took Ollie also. They were identical twins and were very beautiful and full of life. Aunt Ollie said all she remembered was washing dishes the whole time. Robert Anderson, who was Edna Anderson's son and Mr. Abbey's nephew, of course, was a friend of mine, and Robert said that they thought Ollie and Dollie were two of the most beautiful girls they had ever seen but that, of course, they could not understand a word they said because of their heavy southern accent. This seems funny now when everybody talks about the same way.

In 1941 C. T., Dollie and June Abbey went to California and stopped in Odessa, Texas to see Mr. Abbey's brother, Erwin. It turned out that Erwin was in very poor financial circumstances and was in bed very sick, perhaps with pneumonia. Mr. Abbey, Dollie and June went on to California and when they came back through Odessa to see how Erwin was getting along they discovered that he had died, and Mr. Abbey took care of the funeral. Mr. Abbey had always been very devoted to Erwin. Mr. Abbey was a very sensitive person but he would never express his feelings but you could tell how deeply affectionate he was to people in general and to many particular people such as his brother Erwin.

Erwin and his wife Edna Hyde had one daughter Ruth who lived in Las Vegas, Nevada. She came to Mr. Abbey's 90th birthday party in San Antonio. Aunt Iva had five or six children and Aunt Maude had five or six children and Emma Jane had one son, Wilbur Larson, who lived in Las Vegas, but who lived most of his life in Watertown, Wisconsin where his three sons were born. We have met all of them. Aunt Edna Anderson had Robert, Ruth and Mary Lou. Ruth lives in Illinois, and had one daughter, Barbara, but her husband, Robert Borst, died several years ago. Robert Anderson had three children, David, Roger and Kay who are all married. David and Roger live in Eau Claire, and Kay and her husband live in Rosebud, Minnesota, and they possibly have five children. Glenn Abbey was never married although he was engaged at one time in South Africa but his fiancé evidently was killed in an automobile wreck. After Dollie Abbey died, her twin sister, Ollie, lived with Mr. Abbey and took care of him until his death. It was a very nice arrangement for her and for him. On almost every Tuesday, Albert McNeel would take Mr. Abbey to the Downtown Rotary Club, and over several years made more meetings than some of the members. These were in the days when most of the Rotarians were actually businessmen or professional people and who had employees. Albert McNeel is a Rotarian now, and most of the people in the Rotary Club now are officers in companies, banks, and other organizations.

Charles Truman Abbey was very highly respected by everyone that ever knew him, and certainly he was highly respected in San Antonio. He single handedly took the Delaware Punch Company, which was absolutely broke and worthless, and built it into a soft drink with bottlers from Florida to California. The small drink business was very difficult because of the domination of Coca Cola who kept the price of the drinks very low so that the people with the lesser volume found it very difficult to make much money. However, in Mexico, Delaware Punch was a big drink, and the company undoubtedly made more money there than they did in the United States because Delaware is a sweet drink, and the Mexicans like sweet drinks. In fact, the Coca Colas in Mexico are sweeter than they are in the United States.


Euchee Indian Boarding School 

EUCHEE MISSION  

Plans to establish the Euchee Indian Boarding School began as early as 1891, but the school was not built until 1894...

The land was public domain, but in 1899 it was surveyed and 40 acres reserved for the school...

The school in the beginning was in charge of a Presbyterian Mission at Park Hill. It had an 80 pupil capacity. The Council agreed that it be co-educational with 50 Creeks and 50 Euchees. Noah Gregory was the first Superintendent.

When first organized the school had 3 buildings - 2 dorms and a 3 room school less than a mile outside the city limits.

1925 it became a school for boys - 110 Euchees and Creeks and more buildings were added. The girls were sent to Eufaula. 1928 the school opened the Federal support, receiving Creek, Euchee, Cherokee and Seminole boys. In 1929 ninth-grade boys were placed in the pubic schools of Sapulpa.

1895-1899 J. H. Land was Superintendent and Minister of the school. 1900 Wm A. Sapulpa was the Superintendent.

1897 Creek Nation took over and provided for maintenance of the school. 

1907 control of the school was assumed by the Federal Government. 

1929 boys above forth grade were enrolled in Sapulpa City Schools. Fifth and sixth graders attended Woodlawn School which was located on the two acres given to the City of Sapulpa by the Creek Nation. Seventh and eighth grades attended Washington School. The school accepted students from this area who were without adequate homes, having lost one or more parents. Boys must not have less than 1/4 degree Indian blood. Creek, Euchee, Seminole, Chickasaw, Cherokee tribes were enrolled.

1947 the Euchee Mission was abolished by government order and pupils absorbed by the Sapulpa School system.

Source: Sapulpa, 74066 Vol. 1, p. 112

Other bits about Euchee Mission from the Sapulpa book -

Stella Woodson, R. N. Nurse at Euchee Mission
Hattie Garber teacher at Euchee Mission Much credit for the founding of Euchee Mission is due to Samuel Brown, Noah Gregory, Henry Land and Wm Sapulpa.

Euchee Tribe of Indians, 2 S. Independence, Sapulpa.....918-224-3065

Wanda Havlick  granny37@ipa.net
I went to Woodlawn School (the old one) several hundred years ago while the Euchee Mission was active.  The old Woodlawn was located just to the south of what is now the administration building.  When I was in grades 1-3, the Euchee area was fenced and we were not allowed to cut through there and had to go down to Lincoln Street to get to the residential areas east of the mission.

By fourth grade the mission had been opened and the Woodlawn 4th grades had classes in one of the two of three two storied buildings that were either dorms for the mission students or classrooms....I really don't remember. I do remember that there were four classes in each building.  The buildings sat about where the parking lot is located on the east side of Woodlawn (new) and the HS.  There was a house located on the property occupied by the Bonham family, I think.  Both adult Bonhams were teachers.  I don't recall any other homes ever being on that piece of land now occupied by the school.

One of the old mission buildings was used as a Youth Center at one time and was near the center of the area now occupied by the schools.  I lived in the 1400 block of Thompson Street and remember walking through the area.

We were not allowed to fraternize with the Mission students, nor they with us.  However, I recall that many of the students later attended Woodlawn. At my age, I hardly remember what happened yesterday, but I do remember Euchee Mission.  Would you believe I felt discriminated against because I thought their school was for the more privileged???
WH

Charlie R Brooks  c744092@webzone.net
The Euchee school was located on a large plot of ground that extended from Mission & Lee streets south to Lincoln and East to what is now Watchhorn. The buildings were located east of Mission about 50-100 yards from the street. Altho I'm not Creek or Euchee (Part Cherokee) I took boxing  from a Coach at the mission who was called "Two Thumbs".  There is a Euchee Mission Society located at Okmulgee Ok. at the Creek Headquarters and I believe they have a complete roster of all who attended over the years.

Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA]
(Record Group 75)

75.20.11 Records of the Euchee Boarding School, Sapulpa, OK

Textual Records (in Fort Worth): Narrative and statistical reports, with accompanying photographs, 1928-46. Records relating to enrollment and attendance, 1914-42; and personnel, 1912-47. Student case files, 1912-47.

University of Oklahoma Libraries
Western History Collections
SAPULPA (OKLAHOMA) EUCHEE BOARDING SCHOOL COLLECTION
Ledgers recording supplies used by the school, along with the number of teachers and students in attendance, 1915-1918.
 

When the Nuyaka Boarding School was closed the students of that school were transferred to Euchee Boarding School, which is still in use and retains its same name.

Indian Pioneer History Project for Oklahoma
Date: April 29, 1937
Field Worker: Jefferson Berryhill
Volume 102  
Creek Schools

THE INDIAN SCHOOLS
There are quite a number of Indian Schools today. Some of the old Indian Missions have been abandoned, but some are still in use.

Nuyaka Mission or Nuyaka Boarding School ceased to be a boarding school in 1923. It is located fourteen miles west of Okmulgee.

Another Indian School known as Euchee Boarding School is located on the east edge of Sapulpa. When the Nuyaka Boarding School was closed the students of that school were transferred to Euchee Boarding School, which is still in use and retains its same name.

Eufaula Boarding School for girls located in the edge of Eufaula.

Chilocco Indian School is located in the northwest part of Oklahoma near the Kansas line.

Haskell Institute is at Lawerence, Kansas. It is a big school and all kinds of Indian tribes go there.

Riverside, California, is another Indian School.

Sequoyah Training School, located near Tahlequah, Oklahoma is another Indian school mostly for Cherokee although many Creek Indians go to school there.

Mekusukey, an Indian school near Wewoka, Oklahoma, was destroyed by fire but now it is expected to be rebuilt again.

An old Indian school of Wealaka has been abandoned.

Another at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, was also abandoned.
 

SAPULPA, 15.2 m. (712 alt., 12,249 pop.), a cattle-shipping, cotton-marketing, and manufacturing city, is also in the center of oil and gas fields. Sapulpa's largest field was a part of the rich Glenn Pool (L), which extended to within four miles of the town.

About 1850, Jim Sapulpa, a Creek Indian, came to this point from Alabama and commenced farming on Rock Creek, about a mile southeast of the present site of Sapulpa. Later he started a store in his home, hauling his goods by team and pack horses from Fort Smith.

In 1886 the Frisco Railway built to this point, and for a few years Sapulpa was the rail terminus; this laid the foundation upon which the city later became an important cattle-shipping center.

One of the boarding schools maintained by the Creek Indians as a part of their well-knit educational system was established here in October, 1893. The institution was founded for the Euchees, an alien people who had united with the Creeks in their former eastern home and had consequently been moved here with them. The language of the Euchees was so foreign and unintelligible (even to the Creeks) that all communication between the tribes had to be carried on through interpreters. Cut off as they were from their neighbors by this linguistic wall, the Euchees were particularly observant of customs and traditions. With the passage of the Curtis Act by Congress in 1898, the Creeks lost control of their schools to the Department of the Interior, and in 1928 the maintenance was also taken over by the Federal government. Since then, this institution, renamed the EUCHEE INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL, has offered instruction in the first four grades to Indian boys and girls of all tribes. For higher grades, the boys attended Sapulpa's public schools.


POSTMASTERS & POST OFFICES OF
PECOS COUNTY, TEXAS
1872 - 1930

DRYDEN (Pecos, Terrell) (see also THURST)

Simonds, Warner W., 12 Dec 1888

Barrett, David R., 27 Jan 1891

Discontinued 16 May 1891; papers to Sanderson

(Re-established) Franks, Dan'l. G., 24 Jun 1891

Jungman, Peter B., 24 May 1893

Now in Terrell County

 

Index to Probate Cases of Atascosa County Texas

September 28, 1857 to March 6, 1939

Contributed by Terri Goins Lorenz

Index to Probate Cases, Names Begining with "F"

NAME

STATUS

DATE FILED

CASE NUMBER

Facundo, Pedro

Deceased

Sept. 15, 1884

84

Fagin, A. L.

NCM

Oct. 29, 1907

337, 261

Fagin, A. L.

NCM

Nov. 20, 1917

520

Fagin, Abe

NCM

June 7, 1903

261, 337

Fagin, Abel

NCM

March 12, 1906

305

Faris, Josepha

Tubercular

June 12, 1936

1050

Farran, Gertrude M., Kathleen B., and Walter

Minors

June 16, 1905

296

Farrell, Edward F. and Mary Annie

Monors

Aug. 12, 1879

49

Farris, A. F.

Deceased

Aug. 9, 1911

394

Farris, Alonzo F.

Minor

Nov. 17, 1892

173

Farris, Amanda Mildred

Deceased

Jan. 19, 1931

866

Faulkner, Madge

NCM

March 20, 1936

1032

Faver, Emma

NCM

Oct. 11, 1904

287

Faver, Gus M.

Minor

April 19, 1909

365

Faver, Harl. Lester and Lloyd

Minors

July 22, 1924

679

Faver, J. M.

Deceased

Jan. 17, 1914

454

Faz, Otilla and Rudolph

Minors

July 14, 1926

749

Fallrath, Annie1

NCM

July 15, 1916

490

Fenelon, M. P.

Deceased

March 10, 1928

788

Fennell, M. P.

Deceased

March 3, 1926

731

Ferguson, James W.

Minor

Nov. 28, 1932

934

Fernandez, Emma

Minor

May 17, 1927

773

Fisher, Morton

Deceased

May 27, 1890

149

Fisher, Morton C.

Deceased

April 10, 1891

154

Fletcher, J. M.

Tubercular

June 6, 1932

921

Florence, Walter D.

Tubercular

March 3, 1931

871

Flores, Canuto

Deceased

May 21, 1903

269

Flores, Edwardo, Guadalupe, Juan, Maria, Maris J., Ramon and Trinidad

Minors

Sept. 22, 1883

77, 71

Flores, Edwardo, Guadalupe, Juan, Maria, Maris J., Ramon and Trinidad

Minors

April 24, 1883

71, 77

Flotte, Fernando

Deceased

Feb. 4, 1914

512

Flowers, Stayton and Wyvonna

Minors

April 8, 1931

875

Fojtik, Emil

NCM

Sept. 20, 1928

802

Fojtik, Veronika

Deceased

July 15, 1938

1131

Foltan, J. Chas.

Deceased

Jan. 7, 1933

938

Fortner, Caleb H., Clara A. and Sallie M.

Minors

Feb. 23, 1883

69

Foster, Thomas Calvin

Deceased

Sept. 24, 1924

686

Fowler, Francis E.

Deceased

Jan. 15, 1935

1024

Fowler, Harry Leonard

Deceased

May 27, 1921

603

Fowler, J. W.

Deceased

Sept. 1, 1927

779

Franklin, Mrs. Nellie

NCM

Sept. 8, 1936

1062

Franks, Alonzo, Artie, Dannie, Lela, Ortie, Oscar and Zorilla

Minors

April 7, 1885

89

Franks, B. F., Deceased; James, Mary L., Mathew, Nancy Ann and William

Minors

Aug. 20, 1863

11 (A)

Franks, Charlie P. and John S.

Minors

Sept. 27, 1912

418

Franks, Essie, Florence and John

Minors

July 26, 1922

626

Franks, Essie O.

Deceased

May 16, 1921

602

Franks, L. A.

Deceased

Nov. 10, 1883

73

Franks, W. M.

NCM

July 29, 1914

451

Franks, Wm. A.

Deceased

March 3, 1916

486

Franks, Wm. A.

Deceased

March 3, 1916

586 (A)


The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 21, 1910, shows Charles B. Shipman (age 30) born in Texas to Mississippi and Texas-born parents is a Farmer owning his farm in Commissioner's District #3, Howard Co., TX. Living with him is his wife of 8 years, Ethel Shipman (age 24) born in Texas to Mississippi and Texas-born parents, with the 3 children born to her all living at home and born to Texas-born parents: Jewell Shipman (age 6) born in New Mexico; Horace Shipman (age 4) born in New Mexico; and Hazle Shipman (age 3) born in Texas. Also living there is Charles' widowed grandmother, Sallie Eaker (age 73) born in Arkansas who has her Own Income.

By 1920 Ethyl is now married to Walter Shipman, not Charles Berry Shipman.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken in January 1920 shows Walter Shipman (age 27) born in Texas to Texas-born parents is a Millwright at a Saw Mill who rents his home at 102 Perry Street, 6th Ward, City of Detroit, Wayne Co., MI. Living with him is his wife Ethel Shipman (age 34) born in Texas to Texas-born parents who is a Saleslady in a Dry Goods Store. Also living there are two daughters, born in Texas to Texas-born parents: Hazell Shipman (age 13); and Sibyl Shipman (age 8).


Margaret Estelle Aderhold and Harry Shipman at Harry's sister's house in Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX, about 1928.


Horace Stafford "Harry" Shipman and Margaret Estelle Aderhold were married September 1928 in the City of Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX.

Horace Stafford "Harry" Shipman died March 11, 1930 in the City of Detroit, Wayne Co., MI at age 24.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 5, 1930, shows James P. Aderhold (age 62) born in Georgia to Georgia-born parents and first married at age 32 is a Railroad Locomotive Engineer owning his own home valued at $6,700 and living at 700 Avenue C, City of Del Rio, Val Verde Co., TX. Living with him is his wife, Belle L. Aderhold (age 53)  born in Georgia to Georgia-born parents and first married at age 23. Also living there are his two daughters: Margaret Shipman (age 21) born in Texas to Georgia-born parents a widow; and Dorothy Aderhold (age 16) born in Texas to Texas-born parents, unmarried.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 30, 1930, shows Joseph W. Peacock (age 35) born in Florida first married at age 25 and his wife Jewel Peacock (age 26) first married at age 16. He is a Painter living in the City of Dearborn, Wayne Co., MI. His family is there.


The Constitution??, Atlanta, GA, January 24??, 1898

Jacob Barge, Fairburn, Ga.

Fairburn, Ga., January 24. - (Special) -

Mr. Jacob Barge, a prominent and highly respected citizen of this county, died suddenly at his home last night. Mr. Barge was the father of the two Drs. Barge, of Newnan, Ga., and J. J. Barge, of California, recently of the firm of Parker & Barge, of Atlanta, and Judge Barge, who is at present a student of the University of Georgia, and of Miles Barge, who left this county last week for Texas, and whose address is not known.


The Constitution, Atlanta, GA, Sunday, August 8, 1915

FAIRBURN, GA.

Mrs. Margaret L. Barge, of Newnan, and Mrs. James P. Aderhold and children, of Del Rio, Texas, are guests of Mrs. M.  H. Collins.


The Constitution, Atlanta, GA, Saturday, August 6, 1921

Barge and Dorsett Families Will Hold Big Reunion Sunday

An interesting reunion will take place in the park at Union City next Sunday the 7th, at 10:30 o'clock when the Barge family connection of the Barges and Dorsetts will assemble. A big picnic dinner will be served and all of the descendants of either the Barges or the Dorsetts - both extensive families - are invited to be present. Arrangements for the reunion of these two well-known families are being made by Dr. J. R. Barge, well-known Atlanta physician, whose office is in the Georgia Savings Bank & Trust Co. building, formerly the Flat Iron building. The late Jacob Barge and his wife, Mrs. Margaret Dorsett Barge, were for many years well-known country residents in the section to the southwest of Atlanta. They have many descendants, particularly in this community and some located in distant states. A large gathering of both families will be on hand at next Sunday's reunion, and Dr. Barge requests that if any representatives of either of these families should wish further information concerning the reunion they can get it by communicating with him.


MC NEEL

On the morning of September 24, 2004, after a long and courageous battle with cancer, the Lord called Ian Abbey McNeel of Boerne to his eternal reward.

He was born on August 7, 1958 in San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, the son of Albert and June McNeel.

Ian was an Eagle Scout and was awarded the Order of the Arrow. His joy in life was spending time as an avid outdoor enthusiast, loving hunting and fishing.

Ian graduated from Alamo Heights High School in 1976, and then graduated from Texas A&M University in 1983.

Upon graduation from Texas A&M in 1983, Ian worked as a real estate appraiser in San Antonio, and founded McNeel, Weissler & Associates real estate appraisers in 2000.

Ian was a Member of the Appraisal Institute, where he served on the board of directors.

In 1993, Ian married the love of his life, Kay Sterner. He has two children who were the greatest blessings in his life, Courtney and Connor.

Ian is survived by his wife, Kay; children, Courtney and Connor; father and mother, Albert and Ita McNeel; sisters, Shelby McNeel Miller of San Antonio and Ilse Hummel and her husband, P. J. of Boerne; sisters-in-law, Jane Everett and husband, Zane of Bandera, and Debbie Lee of Brownwood; brother-in-law, Keith Sterner of Dangerfield; mother-in-law, Dorothy Sterner of San Saba, several aunts and uncles, and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, and many friends.

The family would like to express special thanks to Dr. Ronald Drengler of CTRC and his nurses, Gail and Stacy, who supported Ian and his family through many difficult times.


VITAL RECORDS - KENDALL COUNTY, TX - MARRIAGES 1993

File           Husband                Husband      Wife                      Wife       Marriage
Number           Name                   Age         Name                      Age          Date

 

66434    MCNEEL IAN A                    34    STERNER KAY                     31      19-Jun-1993


The combined Franks and Brite families, about 1895, taken in front of the Dolch Holtel, Eagle Pass, TX. Mattie Brite, age 15 (standing second from left), Bennie Brite, age 13 (standing fifth from left), Alva Brite Franks (seated at right), Daniel Franks (seated next to Alva), Robert Franks (in lap of Daniel Franks), Edward Sturges (seated second from left). 


The Kerrville Times, Kerrville, TX, April 23, 1952

HUNT TIDINGS

A notice of interest to a lot of friends in the Hill Country was the announcement of the opening of the law office of Albert M. McNeel, Jr., in San Antonio. Albie was a counselor at Camp La Junta for a number of years and has a host of friends in Hunt who wish him well.


The Kerrville Times, Kerrville, TX, November 19, 1952

HUNT TIDINGS

Mr. and Mrs. Albert McNeel of San Antonio are spending a week at the Walsh home here in Hunt.


The Kerrville Times, Kerrville, TX, November 26, 1952

Of interest to a lot of Hunt people is the announcement that Albert McNeel and his bride spent a week at the Walsh home before returning to San Antonio where Mr. McNeel is in the law business.


The Kerrville Times, Kerrville, TX, December 12, 1952

HUNT TIDINGS

Mrs. F. C. Walsh, after attending the McNeel wedding in San Antonio last week went on to Corpus Christi to be with Mrs. Ralph Walsh and her family for Thanksgiving.


The Kerrville Times, Kerrville, TX, October 14, 1953

HUNT TIDINGS

Mr. and Mrs. Edward McCamish of San Diego, California and his mother, Mrs. E. W. McCamish and sister, Mrs. McNeel of San Antonio all spent the day with Mrs. F. C. Walsh this past week. While here they took a trip to Bear Creek where Mr. McCamish hadn't been for years.


 

 


Ilse Frost McNeel

Born in San Antonio, TX on Feb. 22, 1930
Died Nov. 30, 2007 and resided in San Antonio, TX.

Visitation: Sunday, Dec. 2, 2007

MEMORIAL  SERVICE: Monday, Dec. 3, 2007

Funeral Home: Porter Loring Mortuary

Ilse (Ita) Herff Frost Garrett McNeel, the great-great granddaughter of Dr. Ferdinand Herff, founder of Santa Rosa Hospital, and the great granddaughter of Col. T. C. Frost, founder of Frost National Bank, was born February 22, 1930 at Santa Rosa Hospital in San Antonio and passed away November 30, 2007 after a courageous battle with cancer. She was pre-deceased by her mother and father, Ilse Herff Frost and Tom C. Frost; her first husband, Donald Wallace Garrett; daughter, Kathleen Garrett Prosk, and son, Ian McNeel. She is survived by her husband of 22 years, Albert Maverick McNeel, Jr.; her brother and sister-in-law, Tom and Pat Frost; her daughter, Ilse Garrett Hummel and husband, PJ; her daughter, Shelby McNeel Neuhmann, and husband, Kyle; her son-in-law, Steve Prosk, and wife, Cathy; her daughter-in-law, Kay McNeel Barclay and husband, Andy. Also surviving are 11 grandchildren: Michael Garrett and wife, Lauri; Natalie Smith and husband, Ian; Jocelyn Harrison and husband, Marcus; Elizabeth Griffin, Shere Prosk, Keith Prosk, Courtney McNeel, Connor McNeel, Elliot Waggoner, Hailey Miller and Jordan Miller; two great grand children, Mikaela Garrett and Dylan Newman, as well as numerous nieces and nephews and their families. Ita attended Saint Mary’s Hall in San Antonio, Fairfax Hall in Waynesboro, VA, The Ogontz School in Philadelphia and the University of Texas at Austin. She was a member of the Junior League of San Antonio, the Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority, and the San Antonio Country Club. A dedicated, life-long member and parishioner of Christ Episcopal Church, she was also active in Family Services Association and Planned Parenthood, as well as many other civic efforts. Heartfelt thanks go to the staff of Brighton Gardens, Vista Care Hospice and especially her caregivers, Sharrelle Kemp and Bernadine Richard. Visitation will be on Sunday, December 2nd from 5:00 P.M. through 7:00 P.M. at Porter Loring.


 

 

McNeel, 77, was known for optimism, reaching out to others

Ilse "Ita" Herff Frost Garrett McNeel, 77, the great-granddaughter of Dr. Ferdinand Herff, founder of Santa Rosa Hospital, and the great-granddaughter of Col. T.C. Frost, founder of Frost National Bank, died Friday of cancer.

When McNeel's friends and family gather Monday for her memorial service, they will celebrate her life by reading and singing verses she underlined in her dog-eared Bible.

"All that we're going to use is something she had known and loved in life," said her only sibling, Tom Frost, 80.

He said his sister always reached out to help others. She was a homemaker and dedicated parishioner of Christ Episcopal Church.

McNeel is remembered most for her optimistic take on life, her friends said.

"She could take the worst situation you've ever seen and tell you how lovely it was and that it would turn out to be just fine," said Nell Herff, McNeel's childhood friend. "We'll all miss her terribly."

Herff said McNeel often took care of her grandchildren. McNeel and her husband, Albert McNeel Jr., were both widowed when they married 22 years ago.

Ita McNeel attended Saint Mary's Hall in San Antonio, Fairfax Hall in Waynesboro, Va., the Ogontz School in Philadelphia and the University of Texas at Austin. She was a member of the Junior League of San Antonio, Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority and the San Antonio Country Club.

Laura Anne Gibson, a nurse at Brighton Gardens on Basse Road, said McNeel only lived at the retirement home for a couple months but made her mark there.

"She will be missed," Gibson said. "She was very loving, caring and warmhearted ... a very Christian woman who was very close to her faith. She always asked about how everyone else was doing, always concerned about others."

Gibson said McNeel made no secret about whom she held closest to her heart.

"She loved and talked about her grandkids all the time," Gibson said. "And she called her husband her sweetheart."

nmartinez@express-news.net

Ilse 'Ita' Herff Frost Garrett McNeel

Born:

Feb. 22, 1930

Died:

Nov. 30, 2007

Survived by:

Her husband, Albert Maverick McNeel Jr.; her brother and sister-in-law, Tom and Pat Frost; her daughters, Ilse Garrett Hummel and husband PJ and Shelby McNeel Neuhmann and husband Kyle; her son-in-law, Steve Prosk and wife Cathy; her daughter-in-law, Kay McNeel Barclay and husband Andy; 11 grandchildren; and numerous nephews and nieces.

Services:

Visitation will be today from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Porter Loring at 1101 McCullough Ave. Memorial service will be Monday at 11 a.m. at Christ Episcopal Church at 510 Belknap Place.

San Antonio Express-News (TX) - Sunday, December 2, 2007