Rachael Susanna Drew


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Francis Jefferson Coates was born August 24, 1843, in Platteville, Grant Co., Wisconsin Territory, and died January 27, 1880, in Dorchester Pct., Saline Co., NE, at age 36. Buried in Dorchester Cemetery, Saline Co., NE. He is the son of William Starr Coates of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA, and Cynthia Harriet Cain of Tennessee. He was a Medal of Honor recipient for his courageous actions in the Battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War.

Rachael Susannah "Rachel" Drew: Born January 23, 1846, in Madison Twp., Clinton Co., IN, and died September 20, 1933, in Blue Twp., Jackson Co., MO, at age 87. Buried in Dorchester Cemetery, Saline Co., NE. She is the daughter of Waldron Drew of Monroe Twp., Miami Co., OH, and Sarah Stetler of Westford, Otsego Co., NY.

Francis Jefferson Coates and Rachael Susannah "Rachel" Drew were married April 21, 1867, in Muscoda, Grant Co., WI.

Francis Jefferson Coates and Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) Coates had five children:

  1. Francis Jefferson "Frank" Coates Jr.: Born January 16, 1868, in Boscobel, Grant Co., WI; Died October 11, 1934, in Grand Island, Hall Co., NE (age 66). Married (1) October 12, 1887, in Unknown to Mary M. Mattes: Born May 1864/1865 in Nebraska; Died August 6, 1917, in Grand Island, Hall Co., NE (about age 32). Married (2) to Harriet Evelyn Ferris: Born 1887/1888 in Illinois; Died Unknown.
  2. Alfrata "Retta" Coates: Born March 2 or 8, 1869, in Boscobel, Grant Co., WI; Died January 20, 1879, in Dorchester, Saline Co., NE (age 9).
  3. William Waldron Coates: Born June 21, 1872, in Dorchester, Saline Co., NE; Died September 21, 1947, in Monterey, Monterey Co., CA (age 75). Married February 10, 1896, in Tippecanoe Co., IN, to Iva "Eva" Meredith: Born July 5, 1877, in Fremont, Dodge Co., NE; Died August 3, 1928, in Kaw, Jackson Co., MO (age 51).
  4. Rena Cynthia Coates: Born November 21, 1874, in Dorchester, Saline Co., NE; Died June 19, 1965, in Missouri (age 90). Buried in Knob Noster City Cemetery, Knob Noster, Johnson Co., MO. Married May 16, 1892, in Douglas Co., NE, to William James Weston: Born March 21, 1861, in England; Died August 20, 1940, in Washington Twp., Johnson Co., MO (age 79). Buried in Knob Noster City Cemetery, Knob Noster, Johnson Co., MO.
  5. Eva Melissa Coates: Born June 3, 1879, in Dorchester, Saline Co., NE; Died May 5, 1962, in Independence, Jackson Co., MO (age 82). Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE. Married November, 1893, in Nebraska to Joseph Adelbert Withee: Born March 9, 1878, in Yankton Co., Dakota Territory; Died May, 1908, in Omaha, Douglas Co., NE (age 28). Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE.

After Francis Jefferson Coates died, Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) Coates, a widow, married Oscar H. "O. H." Brown, a widower.

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown was born January 23, 1851, in Eastchester Twp., Westchester Co., NY, and died March 22, 1898, in Dorchester Twp., Saline Co., NE, at age 47. Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE. He is the son of Peter J. Brown of Westchester Co., NY, and Hester Jane Sloat of White Plains, NY.

Ann "Annie" Jones was born about January, 1854, in Platte Co., MO, and died April 26, 1891, in Omaha, Douglas Co., NE, at age 37 years three months. Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE. She is the daughter of Henry Jones of Wales or England, and Mary J. Unknown of Ohio. Henry lived in Florence, Douglas Co., NE, at the time of Anna's death.

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown and Ann "Annie" Jones were married March 30, 1872, in Douglas Co., NE.

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown and Ann "Annie" (Jones) Brown had two children:

  1. George V. Brown: Born about 1873 in Omaha, Douglas Co., NE; Died after 1894 in Unknown. Married August 1, 1894, in Missouri Valley, Harrison Co., IA, to Barsheba G. "Babsby" (McClintock) Connelly: Born July 23, 1868, in Kansas; Died 1894 - 1913 in Unknown. Her parents are James W. McClintock of Indiana and Mary Sherley "Polly" Wells of Kentucky. James and Mary were married May 24, 1855, in Leavenworth, Leavenworth Co., KS. Barsheba and Dewitt Douglas Connelly (born December, 1858, in Iowa; died March 25, 1922, in Olmstead, MN) were married January 15, 1889, in Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO.
  2. William Henry Brown: Born January 12, 1875, in Omaha, Douglas Co., NE; Died June 8, 1956, at South Austin Hospital, Butler, Bates Co., MO (age 81). Buried in Fairview Cemetery, Bates Co., MO. Married (1) about 1900 in Nebraska, to Margaret E. "Maggie" Feagins/Fegan: Born September, 1882, in Nebraska to Ohio and Iowa-born parents; Died Unknown. Married (2) after 1920 in Bates Co., MO, to Ordillia Ellen "Della" (Searfus) Sandage: Born June 3, 1874, in Butler Co., MO; Died May 11, 1956, at Nevada City Hospital, Nevada, Vernon Co., MO (age 81). Buried in Fairview Cemetery, Bates Co., MO. She was first married (1) March 1, 1891, in Bates Co., MO, to Eugene Arthur "Henry" Gough: Born March 1, 1870, in Christian Co., IL; Died August 8, 1917, in Butler, Bates Co., MO (age 47). Then married (2) December 10, 1922, in Butler, Bates Co., MO, to Joshua Sandage: Born November 10, 1859, in Indiana; Died March 3, 1931, in Lone Oak Twp., Bates Co., MO (age 71).

After Ann "Annie" (Jones) Brown died, Oscar H. "O. H." Brown married a widow, Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) Coates.

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown and Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) Coates were married June 4, 1892, in Omaha, Douglas Co., NE.

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown and Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) (Coates) Brown had no children.




TIMELINE 


Francis Jefferson Coates and Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) (Coates) Brown are buried in Dorchester Cemetery, Saline Co., NE. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


   

Sergeant Francis Jefferson Coates, about 1862.


   

Francis Jefferson Coates after his wounds incurred at Gettysburg, PA. The tintype picture on the left was taken after April 21, 1867, since he is wearing his wedding ring. The colorized version was done to commemorate his winning the Congressional Medal of Honor.


Francis Jefferson Coates, late 1879, Saline Co., NE.


Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) Coates, late 1879, Saline Co., NE.


Left to right: Eva Melissa Coates, William Waldron Coates, Rena Cynthia Coates and Francis Jefferson "Frank" Coates Jr., in late 1879, Saline Co., NE.


Sarah Stetler was born April 21, 1819, in New York.

Henry Brenneman was born November 15, 1822, in North Woodbury Twp., Bedford Co., PA.

Mazey Ann Blake was born February 3, 1825, in Sharpsburg, Blair (Bedford) Co., PA.

Waldron Drew and Sarah Stelter were married March, 1840, in New York.

The 1840 U. S. Census taken 1840 shows John Brenniman is the Head of Household and is living in Woodbury Twp., Bedford Co., PA. Living there: Males, 0-5=1, 5-9=1, 10-14=1, 15-19=1, 20-29=2 and 50-59=1; Females, 5-9=1, 10-14=1, and 40-49-1.

Francis Jefferson Coates was born August 24, 1843, in Platteville, Grant Co., Wisconsin Territory.

Henry Brenneman and Mazey Ann Blake were married August 11, 1844, in Pennsylvania. They lived near Sharpsburg, Blair Co., PA.

Rachael Susannah "Rachel" Drew was born January 23, 1846, in Madison Twp., Clinton Co., IN.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 14, 1850, shows Waldron Drew (age 31) born in Ohio is a Farmer and is living in Madison Twp., Clinton Co., IN. Living with him is Sarah Drew (age 31) born in Indiana. Also living there are five children, all born in Indiana: Jacob A. Drew (age 9); Mary A. Drew (age 6); Rachael S. Drew (age 4); Sarah J. C. Drew (age 2); and John W. Drew (age 1/12).

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 19, 1850, shows Henry Breneman (age 28) born in Pennsylvania is a Farmer and is living in North Woodbury Twp., Blair Co., PA. Living with him is Mazean Breneman (age 25) born in Pennsylvania. Also living there are three Breneman children, all born in Pennsylvania: Martin Breneman (age 5); Albert Breneman (age 3); and Anthony Breneman (age 1). Other Breneman families live nearby, including Elizabeth Breneman (age 56).

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown was born January 23, 1851, in Eastchester Twp., Westchester Co., NY.

Henry Brenneman died November 5, 1852, in Martinsburg, Blair Co., PA, at age 29.

Ann "Annie" Jones was born about January, 1854, in Missouri.

Sarah (Stetler) Drew died May 1, 1855, in Eagle Corners, Eagle Twp., Richland Co., WI, at age 36, while giving birth.

Waldron Drew and Mazey Ann (Blake) Brenneman were married July 15, 1855, in Dorchester, Saline Co., NE.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on August 10, 1860, shows St. John (age 56) born in Connecticut, and with real estate of $1,000 and personal estate of $400 is a Farmer, and is living in Muscoda Twp., Grant Co., WI. Living with him are: Eliza J. St. John (age 48) born in Connecticut; Theadore E. St. John (age 27) born in Connecticut, a Farmer; Ferdenand St. John (age 21) born in Connecticut; Lagrand St. John (age 12) born in Connecticut; Herman M. St. John (age 10) born in Connecticut; and Rachell S. Drew (age 14) born in Indiana.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on June 5, 1860, shows Wm. Coates (age 43) born in Indiana, and with real estate of $2,000 and personal estate of $400 is a Farmer, and is living in Boscobel Twp., Grant Co., WI. Living with him are: Harriet Coates (age 37) born in Tennessee; Jefferson Coates (age 16) born in Wisconsin; Isaac C. Coates (age 15) born in Wisconsin; Harriet E. Coates (age 14) born in Wisconsin; Robert Coates (age 11) born in Wisconsin; Sarah J. Coates (age 6) born in Wisconsin; and Eva Coates (age 8/12) born in Wisconsin.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on August 13, 1860, shows Richard Alexander (age 33) born in New York, and with real estate of $1,600 and personal estate of $500 is a Farmer, and is living in Pulaski Twp., Iowa Co., WI. Living with him are: Miriam Alexander (age 26) born in Indiana; Elizabeth Alexander (age 2) born in Wisconsin; Elwood Alexander (age 5/12) born in Wisconsin; and Jefferson Coats (age 17) born in Wisconsin, a Farm Laborer.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on June 19, 1860, shows Waldron Drew (age 41) born in Ohio with real estate worth $500 and personal estate worth $150 is a Laborer and is living in Richmond Twp., Richland Co., WI. Living with him is Mary A. Drew (age 35) born in Pennsylvania. Also living there are: Martin Drew (age 15) born in Pennsylvania; Albert Drew (age 13) born in Pennsylvania; Anthony Drew (age 11) born in Pennsylvania; Alexander Drew (age 9) born in Pennsylvania; Henry Drew (age 7) born in Pennsylvania; Josephine Drew (age 5) born in Wisconsin; Samuel W. Drew (age 3) born in Wisconsin; Jacob Drew (age 19) born in Indiana; Mary Ann Drew (age 17) born in Indiana; Rachael Drew (age 14) born in Indiana; Sarah J. Drew (age 12) born in Indiana; John W. Drew (age 9) born in Indiana; and Elizabeth Drew (age 7) born in Wisconsin.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 19, 1860, shows Nelson Cole (age 36) born in New York with real estate of $650 and personal estate of $300 is a Laborer and is living in the Town of Annawan, Henry Co., IL. Living with him is his wife, Eliz. Cole (age 19) born in Canada. William W. Cole and his family live next door.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on June 9, 1860, shows Peter Brown (age 40) born in New York, is a Farmer, and is living Eastchester Twp, Westchester Co., NY. Living with him are: Hester J. Brown (age 37) born in New York; Mary J. Brown (age 16) born in New York; Rebecca Brown (age 13) born in New York; Geo. V. Brown (age 11) born in New York; Oscar Brown (age 9) born in New York; Wesley Brown (age 7) born in New York; Emma I. Brown (age 5) born in New York; Wm. H. Brown (age 1) born in New York; and Rebecca Fredenburgh (age 77) born in New York.

When the Civil War broke out, the small Wisconsin town of Boscobel, Grant Co., WI, organized two companies of volunteers in April, 1861, the first to do so in Grant County.

On July 12, 1862, The United States Congress passed the bill that recognizes the "bravest of the brave" by creating the Congressional Medal of Honor.


I.--PUBLIC RESOLUTION.

        No. 43.--A RESOLUTION to provide for the presentation of medals of honor to the enlisted men of the army and volunteer forces who have distinguished or may distinguish themselves in battle during the present rebellion.
        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to cause two thousand medals of honor to be prepared, with suitable emblematic devices, and to direct that the same be presented, in the name of Congress, to such non-commissioned officers and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldierlike qualities, during the present insurrection. And that the sum of ten thousand dollars be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of carrying this resolution into effect.

Approved July 12, 1862.


On July 20th, 1861, Francis Jefferson Coates enlisted as a Private in Co. H, 7th Wisconsin Volunteers, Infantry. He was farm boy who enlisted using his middle name, a month before his 18th birthday. The 7th was part of the famous Iron Brigade.

Private Francis Jefferson Coates fought in several battles with the Army of the Potomac,

On Sept. 14, 1862, Francis Jefferson Coates participated in the Battle of South Mountain. In that engagement, he grabbed the regimental flag and rallied his troops to charge the Confederate lines. On this date he was wounded for the first time. South Mountain is classified as a skirmish, but the Seventh Wisconsin lost 126 men killed and wounded on that field. Private Jefferson Coates was one of the wounded. He suffered the loss of an eye.

On September 17th, 1862, during his service, Private Francis Jefferson Coates was promoted to Corporal.

On March 8th, 1863, Corporal Francis Jefferson Coates was promoted from to Sergeant.

On July 1, 1863, the first day's fighting at Gettysburg, PA, Sergeant Francis Jefferson Coates was wounded for the second time, where he lost his other eye, and for gallantry displayed on that field was brevetted Captain and awarded a medal of honor. The 7th Wisconsin, part of General John Reynolds' First Corps, was deployed to aid General John Buford's cavalry brigades at McPherson's Ridge. However, Heth's Confederates were able to drive off the Iron Brigade, of which the 7th Wisconsin was a part, from their position with considerable loss.

It looked like the Confederates were going to beat the Union. Coates and his ilk were greatly outnumbered at at first. His orders were to hold his line and position - which he did for as long as he could - until the “skirmish” became much more than that and Jefferson’s men began to scatter. Eventually they made their way backward, toward the Lutheran Seminary, sort of backing up from ridge to fence to ridge. At a certain point, Jefferson’s crew (the 7th Wisconsin, part of the famous Iron Brigade) was surrounded by three sides. They suffered great losses.

As the 151st Pennsylvania and Stone's brigade withdrew from McPherson's Ridge, the 7th Wisconsin formed the rear guard of the Iron Brigade. Lieutenant Colonel John Callis looked back and saw the large brick Seminary on the ridge behind him. Making this landmark his objective point, he issued the order, “by the right of companies to the rear, march.” During the fighting withdrawal. the 7th received a direct fire from the front and an enfilading fire from both flanks. A ball struck Private John Shultz of Company H in the right upper jaw and lodged near his skull behind the right ear. Sergeant Francis Jefferson Coates. a 19-year-old sergeant in the same company, received a ghastly wound similar to the one sustained by Michael Link of the I51st Pennsylvania. A ball hit him near the right temple and emerged on the opposite side of the head. The inch-and-a-half diameter wound tore away nearly the entire orbital plate and severed the optic nerves. Coates was left behind during the retreat "sightless and defenseless with blood streaming" from his eye sockets. A short time later, an enemy soldier jabbed him with a bayonet. Another began to remove his shoes, but was prevented from completing the act by Francis' frantic kicks and screams of protest. Finally. a compassionate Rebel carried the wounded sergeant under a shade tree and gave him some water. In grateful appreciation, Coates supplied his merciful foe with a portion of his coffee.

The official record is inaccurate:

Francis Jefferson Coates, as a Private, suffered the loss of his first eye on September 14, 1862.

Francis Jefferson Coates, as a Sergeant, suffered the loss of his second eye on July 1, 1863. Since the damage was so severe, it seemed to the surgeons that both eyes were shot out at this time.

During the fighting, Coates was struck by a ball on the right side of his face, which caused him to lose both of his eyes. For his courage, the Wisconsin farm boy received a brevet promotion to Captain, in addition to the Medal of Honor, which was awarded on June 29th, 1866. His citation reads:

"For extraordinary heroism on 1 July 1863, while serving with Company H, 7th Wisconsin Infantry, in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, for unsurpassed courage in battle, where he had both eyes shot out."

The Alton Democrat newspaper, Alton, Sioux Co., IA, was one of a number of United States newspapers that carried the identical article in 1896 about the 7th Wisconsin Volunteers. By chance, Francis Jefferson Coates was singled out as a soldier who demonstrated extreme bravery under fire.

Coates fought in several battles with the Army of the Potomac, including the Battle of South Mountain on Sept. 14, 1862. In that engagement, he grabbed the regimental flag and rallied his troops to charge the Confederate lines.


The Alton Democrat, Alton, Sioux Co., IA, Saturday, April 4, 1896 

Click on the image above for the PDF file.


When Confederate soldiers bore down on Gettysburg, Pa., in 1863, a quiet seminary building atop a ridge was transformed, first into a Union lookout, then a field hospital for 600 wounded soldiers. Now the structure that stood at the center of the Civil War’s bloodiest and most pivotal battle is being transformed once again. On July 1, marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, Schmucker Hall, located on the campus of Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, will reopen as a museum reflecting on the epic battle, the costly war and the complex role of faith. Seminary Ridge Museum will take visitors into the minds of those who fought and explore their conflicting ideas of freedom. Some 750,000 soldiers died during the Civil War and many of them carried and quoted from the Bible. But they read it in divergent ways that still reverberate in a polarized America. “People have found it comfortable to find a way to think about the Civil War in terms of valor and heroism,” said Barbara Franco, executive director of the museum. “We want to really look at these other parts of it — causes, consequences — and leave people thinking there’s more to this than just the simple answers." Visitors begin with a big view of the battlefields. They gaze out from the cupola where Union General John Buford viewed advancing Confederate brigades. They walk the creaking floors where wounded soldiers built back strength over a course of months. They ponder how soldiers suffered and how they made sense of it. “Here were these young men, caught up in these events, and trying to be as faithful as they could be as good Christians,” said Maria Erling, professor of church history at the seminary. “They were consoled by those faith commitments." In interactive exhibits, visitors grapple with mid-19th century moral dilemmas: Would you harbor a fugitive slave if it meant you could go to prison? What motivated nurses, such as the Catholic Daughters of Charity, to tend to the injured on both sides? Exhibits also showcase religious belongings of soldiers who fought at Gettysburg.

“…One brave reb, finding him sightless and defenseless, with blood streaming from his wounds, tried to capture his shoes; another gave him a terrible bayonet wound. Just then a rebel Captain came to his rescue…. A noble-hearted Georgian carried him to a compassionate shade tree and sat him up against its scarred and bracing trunk, and brought him a canteen of water, for which Mr. C. gave the Georgian half his coffee.”

Later records show that Coates recovered from his wounds and attended an Institute for the Blind, where he learned to read Braille. In 1866, he was awarded the Medal of Honor for “unsurpassed courage in the War of the Rebellion.”

John M. Russell created this pictorial representation of the 1863 battle.


 

John M. Russell, copyright, 1992


On July 8, 1863, Francis Jefferson Coates was transferred to Satterlee Hospital in Philadelphia, PA.

On September 1, 1864, Francis Jefferson Coates was mustered out of the Army as a Sergeant.

On September 22, 1864, Francis Jefferson Coates was discharged from Satterlee Hospital in Philadelphia, PA,  and pensioned. Acting Assistant Surgeon M. J. Grier, who reports the case, states that after the assertion of the artificial eyes there will be very little deformity.

Shown below is a very graphic discussion of the medical condition of Francis Jefferson Coates.


Medical Journal

On this occasion the Medical Journal examines the case file of Sergt. Jefferson Coates, Co. “H”, 7th Wisconsin Infantry.  Sergt. Coates enlisted at Boscobel, Wisconsin, August 29, 1861. At the time of his enlistment he gave his residence as Boscobel and indicated his place of birth was in Grant County, Wisconsin. Regimental records show that Sergt. Coates was promoted from Corp. to Sergt. It also shows that he was wounded twice, once at South Mountain, September 14, 1862, and again at Gettysburg, July 1st, 1863. The wound he received at Gettysburg was debilitating and caused the loss of both eyes. Sergt. Coates was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, for gallantry in action, and Brevetted to the rank of Captain, July 1, 1863. Regimental records show that he was discharged from active military service September 1, 1864.

Sergt. Coates’ case file is found under the heading of; “Wounds and Injuries of the Face” Chapter II, page 326.

Case, --- Sergeant Jefferson Coates, Co. “H”, 7th Wisconsin Volunteers, aged 20 years was wounded at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, by a conoidal ball, which entered immediately behind the outer angle of the right eye, passed through the orbital plate at the junction of the malar and frontal bones, through the great wing of the sphenoid, and emerged at a point corresponding to the place of entrance, producing a wound not less then an inch and a half in diameter, and tearing away nearly the whole of the orbital plate. The wound of entrance was about half an inch in diameter. He was admitted to the Seminary Hospital, Gettysburg, and, on July 8th, transferred to the Satterlee Hospital, Philadelphia., When admitted, the tunics of the right eye were hanging out and much tumefied, about as large as a black walnut, and covered with a mass of slough: there was complete  eversion of the right lower lid; otherwise the lids of both eyes were uninjured. The left eye was shrunken, its contents evacuated, and the upper lid was over lapped by the lower. In other respects, with the exception of a slight inflammation, the tunics of this eye were healthy in appearance. In its passage, the ball had apparently passed immediately beneath the cribriform plate of the ethmoid, destroying a portion of the latter and the lachrymal bones, and probably severing the optic nerves. There  was a profuse discharge of pus from both wounds, and a little through the laceration in the tissues of the left eye. The sense of smell was entirely destroyed. The patient was in a tolerably good condition, but restless; his appetite was moderate, tongue slightly furred, and pulse about 90. Flaxseed dressings were applied. On July 10th, what appeared to be the external angular process of the frontal bones was taken from the left wound; also several small spiculae from the right side. On the 11th the wounds looked better; on the 13th, a small bone, probably from orbital portion of the great wing of the sphenoid, left side, was extracted. On the 17th, the slough separated entirely from the right eye, which presented a much improved condition. No symptoms of cerebral disturbance appeared. On the 19th, there was considerable oedema of the left eye, and the inflammation was more marked. On July 21st, a thin plate of bone was discharged from the nose, apparently a piece of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid. Oedema of the upper lip had much increased, though with very little pain. July 24th: the oedema of the left eye was rapidly disappearing under a water discharge. Which tasted salty. July 25th: another small piece of bone came away from the left wound. There was still a profuse discharge; the right wound was much smaller, and the left was granulating finely. Night sweats occurring, quinine in solution with aromatic sulphuric acid was given every three hours.. The right eye was less congested, and the protruding portion was rapidly disappearing under the action of sulphate of copper in crystal. The patient was in good spirits. August 1st: the discharge from the left eye was but small, and healthy granulations were springing up; the discharge from the nose and the night sweats ceased. August 8th: the wound of the entrance had healed; that of the exit was rapidly closing. The patient was discharged on September 22nd, 1864, and pensioned. Acting Assistant Surgeon M. J. Grier, who reports the case, states that after the assertion of the artificial eyes there will be very little deformity.

The Carlisle Military History Institute has several photographs of Sergt. Jefferson Coates. They are listed as RG98S – CWP69.83 & RG98S – CWP 181.61.


About September 22, 1864, Francis Jefferson Coates entered the Western Pennsylvania Institution for the Blind in Philadelphia, PA.


The Western Pennsylvania Institution for the Blind, Philadelphia, PA.


About September 4, 1865, Francis Jefferson Coates was discharged from the Western Pennsylvania Institution for the Blind in Philadelphia, PA. During his almost one year stay there he made great proficiency in instrumental music, learned to read and write according to the method employed by the blind, and also thoroughly acquired the trade of broom making.


The Adams Sentinel, Gettysburg, Adams Co., PA, Tuesday, September 5, 1865 

The Witness has the following regarding a blind soldier: “Mr. Jefferson Coates, formerly a soldier of the 7th Wisconsin, who had both eyes shot out at Gettysburg – the ball passing just behind the optic nerve – is in town on a visit to friends. He has just returned from the State institution for the blind at Philadelphia, to which he was admitted by a special act of the legislature of Pennsylvania. He has been there about a year, during which time he has made great proficiency in instrumental music, learned to read and write according to the method employed by the blind, and also thoroughly acquired the trade of broom making. Mr. Coates is at all times cheerful, and seems to enjoy life, notwithstanding his misfortune.”


A brevet rank was an honorary promotion given to an officer (or occasionally, an enlisted man) in recognition of gallant conduct or other meritorious service. They served much the same purpose that medals play today (our modern system of medals did not exist at the time of the Civil War). A brevet rank was almost meaningless in terms of real authority. For example, a major who was a brevet colonel collected the pay of a major, wore the uniform of a major, could not give orders to lieutenant colonels, and was only eligible for commands that normally fell to majors. But he was allowed to use the title of colonel in his correspondence.

The Medal of Honor was the only medal given for valor at that time. Some MOH recipients got the MOH for simply picking up a battle flag off the battle field. Most were earned, but the criteria was not nearly what it is today. Today, some MOH winners of the Civil War era would likely gotten other awards, like bronze stars, etc. Some would not have been cited at all. Nebraska has a large number of Civil War MOH winners who moved there after the war. There are three in York County, and General Delavon Bates is buried in Aurora. Those fellows were plucky fellows and coming west help calm their restless spirits. There were a fair number of Confederates who came to Nebraska after the war. It took a lot of courage to move there, with their ex-enemies, and make communities. Most of Nebraska's communities were first settled by Union Veterans. For the most part, many communities celebrated all their veterans from both sides, but some communities were very prejudiced toward the Confederates. Ironically, GAR units decorated Confederate graves in some communities like York. But may not have been any mention of that in Saline County. It is suspected that there are a number of Confederates in Saline County, as in the 1880 census there were over three dozen southerners of military service age living in Saline County. So, unless they were honored as such by their family, neighbors, or Union Veterans, their service went unnoticed.


Medals of Honor for battle of Gettysburg
JUNE 3-AUGUST 1, 1863.--The Gettysburg Campaign.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/2 [S# 44]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 91.

Fourteenth Connecticut. -- Sergt. Maj. William B. Hinks, capture of flag of Fourteenth Tennessee; Private Elijah W. Bacon, Company F, capture of flag of Sixteenth North Carolina; Corpl. Christopher Flynn, Company K, capture of flag of Fifty-second North Carolina.

One hundred and twenty-sixth New York. -- Capt. Morris Brown, jr., capture of flag; Private Jerry Wall, Company B, capture of flag; Sergt. George H. Dore, Company D, capture of flag.

Seventy-first Pennsylvania. -- Private John E. Clopp, Company F, capture of flag of Ninth Virginia.

Seventh Wisconsin. -- Sergt. Jefferson Coates, Company H, gallantry in action.

Sixth Wisconsin. -- Corpl. Francis A. Waller, Company I, capture of flag of Second Mississippi.

Nineteenth Massachusetts. -- Corpl. Joseph H. De Costro, Company I, capture of flag of Nineteenth Virginia; Sergt. Benjamin F. Falls, Company A, capture of flag; Sergt. Benjamin H. Jellison, Company C, capture of flag of Fifty-fourth Virginia; Private John Robinson, Company I, capture of flag of Fifty-seventh Virginia.

First Delaware. -- Private John B. Mayberry, Company F, capture of flag; Private Bernard McCarren, Company C, capture of flag.

Eighth Ohio. -- Sergt. John Miller, Company G, capture of two flags (Thirty-fourth North Carolina and Thirty-eighth Virginia); Private James Richmond. Company F, capture of flag.

Twentieth Indiana. -- Private Oliver P. Rood, Company B, capture of flag of Twenty-first North Carolina.

First Minnesota. -- Private Marshall Sherman, Company C, capture of flag of Fifty-eighth Virginia.

First Pennsylvania Rifles. -- Sergt. James B. Thompson, Company G, capture of flag of Fifteenth Georgia.

Fifty-ninth New York. -- Sergt. James Wiley, Company B, capture of a flag of a Georgia regiment.


Francis Jefferson Coates and Rachel Susanna Drew were married April 21, 1867, in Muscoda, Grant Co., WI.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on July 13, 1870, shows Francis J. Coates (age 26) born in Wisconsin, and with real estate of $2,000 and personal estate of $500 is a Broom Maker, and is living in Boscobel, Grant Co., WI. Living with him are: Sarah R. Coates (age 23) born in Indiana, who is Keeping House; Francis J. Coates (age 3) born in Wisconsin; and Henrietta Coates (age 1) born in Wisconsin.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on July 8, 1870, shows Waldren Drew (age 51) born in Ohio, and with real estate worth $300 is a Laborer living in Boscobel, Grant Co., WI. Living with him is Maza A. Drew (age 44) born in Pennsylvania, who is Keeping House. Also living there are the following children all born in Wisconsin: Josephine Drew (age 14); Samuel W. Drew (age 12); Hubert Drew (age 10); Delia C. Drew (age 8); and Elmer E. Drew (age 5).

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 2, 1870, shows Elizabeth H. Cole (age 28) born in Canada West with real estate of $600 and personal estate of $1,500 is a Dress Maker and is living in Abingdon, Cedar Twp., Knox Co., IL.  Co., WI. Living with her is Nelson J. Cole (age 9) born in Illinois.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on July 19, 1870, shows Peter Brown (age 50) born in New York, and with personal estate of $600 is a Carpenter, and is living Ogden, Weber Co., Utah Territory. Living with him are: Ester J. Brown (age 47) born in New York, who is Keeping House; Mary J. Brown (age 16) born in New York; Rebecca Brown (age 23) born in New York; Geo. B. Brown (age 21) born in New York, a Laborer; Oscar Brown (age 19) born in New York, a Laborer; Wesley Brown (age 17) born in New York, a Laborer; Anna Brown (age 15) born in New York; Wm. H. Brown (age 10) born in New York; Eliza Brown (age 9) born in New York; David Brown (age 7) born in New York; and Franklin Brown (age 3) born in New York.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 27, 1870, shows Henry Jones (age 40) born in England, and with real estate of $1,200 is a Teamster, and is living in the 4th Ward, City of Omaha, Douglas Co., NE. Living with him are: Mary J. Jones (age 37) born in Ohio, who Keeps House; and Annie Jones (age 15) born in Missouri.

Mazey Ann (Blake) (Brenneman) Drew died August 24, 1870, in Eagle Corners, Richland Co., WI, at age 45.

The 1872 Omaha City Directory shows Brown Oscar H, teamster, res w s Nineteenth, bet Sherman and Grace

In 1871 - 1872, the Francis Jefferson Coates family removed to Gage Co., NE, and homesteaded on land in the SW 1/4, Section 8, Twp. 6 N, Range 2 E.

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown and Anna "Annie" Jones were married March 30, 1872, in Douglas Co., NE.

On February 7, 1873, Francis Jefferson Coates registered his land claim. He remained on this land until his death in 1880.


Francis Jefferson Coates land claim in PDF format.


Francis Jefferson Coates died January 27, 1880, in Dorchester Pct., Saline Co., NE, at age 36. Buried in Dorchester Cemetery, Saline Co., NE.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 11, 1880, shows Rachal Coats (age 34) born in Indiana to Ohio and Indiana-born parents, is a widow living in the Charles St. John household, and who is Keeping House, and is living in Dorchester Pct., Saline Co., NE. Living with her are: her son, Francis J. Coats (age 12) born in Wisconsin to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents; her son, William W. Coats (age 7) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents; her daughter, Rena C. Coats (age 5) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents; her daughter, Eva M. Coats (age 1) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents; her widower father, Walder Drew (age 61) born in Ohio to Maine and Blank-born parents, a Mail Contractor; and an unmarried Farm Hand, William Fipen (age 32) born in Indiana to Blank-born parents.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 11, 1880, shows Charles St. John (age 36) born in New York is a married Farmer, and is living in Dorchester Pct., Saline Co., NE. Living with him are: his wife, Mary A. St. John (age 35) born in Indiana to Ohio and Indiana-born parents, who is Keeping House; his son, Wm. C. St. John (age 10) born in Wisconsin to New York and Indiana-born parents; his daughter, Dora E. St. John (age 7) born in Nebraska to New York and Indiana-born parents; his son, Sidney A. St. John (age 3) born in Nebraska to New York and Indiana-born parents; and his son, Charles D. St. John (age 5/12 Dec) born in Nebraska to New York and Indiana-born parents.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 8, 1880, shows William Lutz (age 40) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents is a Farmer living on Washington Street, City of Abingdon, Cedar Twp., Knox Co., IL. Living with him is his wife, Elizabeth H. Lutz (age 38) born in Canada to Nova Scotia and Canadian-born parents, who is Keeping House. Living with him are his three sons, all born in Illinois to Pennsylvania and Canadian-born parents: Andrew P. Lutz (age 7); Leland J. Lutz (age 7); and William H. Lutz (age 5/12, born in January). Also living there is William's unmarried step-son: John N. Cole (age 19) born in Illinois to New York and Canadian-born parents, who Works on Farm.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 14, 1880, shows John C. Troyer (age 41) born in Canada to Canadian-born parents is a Farmer and is living in Annawan Twp., Henry Co., IL. Living with him is his wife, Mary J. Troyer (age 36) born in New York to New York-born parents, who is Keeping House. Also living there are his four unmarried children, all born in Illinois to Canadian and New York-born parents: Charles E. Troyer (age 19); Ernist Troyer (age 13); Arthur H. Troyer (age 11); and Ada M. Troyer (age 4). John's parents also live there: John Troyer Sr. (age 70) born in Canada to Pennsylvania-born parents, a Retired Farmer; and Hannah Troyer (age 66) born in Canada to New York-born parents.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 12, 1880, shows Oscar Brown (age 28) born in New Jersey to New York-born parents, is a married Farmer, and is living in West Omaha Pct., Douglas Co., NE. Living with him are: his wife, Annie Brown (age 25) born in Mississippi to Wales and Ohio-born parents, who Keeps House; his son, George Brown (age 7) born in Nebraska to New Jersey and Mississippi-born parents; his son, Willie Brown (age 5) born in Nebraska to New Jersey and Mississippi-born parents; a married Workman, Thos. J. Smith (age 39) born in Mississippi to Mississippi-born parents, a Laborer; and an unmarried Boarder, Sadie Stowers (age 19) born in Indiana to England-born parents, who does House Work.

John Troyer died 1881 in Annawan, Henderson Co., IL, at about age 72.

Waldron Drew and Hannah (Rockefeller) Troyer were married 1883 in Saline Co., NE.

The 1885 Nebraska State Census taken on June 19, 1885, shows Waldron Drew (age 71) born in Ohio to New Hampshire and New York-born parents is a Retired Merchant and is living in the Town of Dorchester, Saline Co., NE. Living with him is his wife, Hannah Drew (age 39) born in Canada to Canadian-born parents, who Keeps House. Living adjacent to them are: Susan Coates (age 16) born in Indiana to Ohio-born parents, a widow who Keeps Home. Living with her are the following, all born to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents: Frank Coates (age 12) born in Wisconsin; William Coates (age 10) born in Nebraska; Rena Coates (age 6) born in Nebraska; and Elna Coates (age 9) born in Nebraska. Leigh Larson note: The ages were incorrectly stated. Waldron's actual age was 66 and Hannah's actual age was 71, and Susan's actual age was 39.

The 1885 Nebraska State Census taken on June 19, 1885, shows Albert Troyer (age 26) born in Illinois to Canadian-born parents is a Mail Carrier and is living in the Town of Dorchester, Saline Co., NE. Living with him are: his wife, Hattie Troyer (age 23) born in Illinois to Illinois-born parents, who Keeps House; and his son, Bennie Troyer (age 2) born in Nebraska to Illinois-born parents.

The 1885 Nebraska State Census taken on June 24, 1885, shows Oscar Browne (age 34) born in New York to New Jersey-born parents, is a Farmer, and is living in West Omaha Pct., Douglas Co., NE. Living with him are: his wife, Annie Browne (age 30) born in Missouri to North Carolina and Delaware-born parents; his son, George Browne (age 12) born in Nebraska to New York and Missouri-born parents; and his son, Willie Browne (age 10) born in Nebraska to New York and Missouri-born parents.

Dewitt Douglas Connelly and Barsheba G. "Babsby" McClintock were married January 15, 1889, in Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO.


Dewitt Douglas Connelly and Barsheba G. "Babsby" McClintock Marriage Record.


The 1890 Special Census for Soldiers for Saline Co., NE, shows Rachel S. Coats, widow of Jefferson Coats. He was a Sergeant in Company H, 7th Wisconsin Infantry. Enlistment date: August 26, 1861. Discharge date: September 22, 1864.


Rachel S. Coats, widow of Jefferson Coats, is shown in the 1890 Special Census for Soldiers for Saline Co., NE.


Eugene Arthur "Henry" Gough and Ordillia Ellen "Della" Searfus were married (1) March 1, 1891, in Bates Co., MO.


Eugene Arthur "Henry" Gough and Ordillia Ellen "Della" Searfus Marriage Record.


Anna "Annie" (Jones) Brown died April 26, 1891, in Omaha, Douglas Co., NE, at age 37 years three months. Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE.


The Omaha World-Herald, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE, Sunday, April 26, 1891

DIED.

BROWN - Mrs. O. H., at 1:30 a.m., age 37 years and 3 months. Funeral from family residence, Thirty-fourth and Cass streets, Monday, April 27, at 2 p.m., to Saints' church, Twenty-first and Clark streets. Interment at Forest Lawn cemetery. Daughter of Henry Jones of Florence, Neb.


Oscar H. Brown and Rachel Susannah (Drew) Coates were married June 4, 1892, in Omaha, Douglas, NE.

Waldron Drew died August 14, 1893, in Dorchester Pct., Saline Co., NE, at age 74.

The 1894 Omaha City Directory shows Brown Oscar H Rev, city missionary Latterday Saints, res 418 N 34th

By October 17, 1895, Mrs. O. H. Brown, Dorchester, NE, had moved from Omaha to Dorchester.

By February 20, 1896, O. H. Brown, Dorchester, NE, had gone on a trip.

Oscar H. "O. H." Brown died March 22, 1898, in Dorchester, Saline Co., NE, at age 47. Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE.


The Omaha World-Herald, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE, Thursday, March 24, 1898

BROWN - Oscar, March 22, 1898 at Dorchester, Neb. He was born at East Chester, N. Y., January 23, 1851, and came to Douglas county, Nebraska, with his parents in 1870 and has been a resident of the county ever since with the exception of the last three years. He will be buried at Forest Lawn from the Latter Day Saints' church, 1816 North Twenty-first street, at 3 p.m. sharp. Friends are invited to attend. 
 
Note: Buried 3/24/1898. Listed as O. H. Brown in online cemetery records.


The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 7, 1900, shows Rachel S. Brown (age 54) born January, 1846, in Indiana to New Hampshire and Indiana-born parents, and with 4 of the 5 children born to her still alive, is a widowed Head of Household, and who rents her home, and is living in Dorchester Village, Dorchester Pct., Saline Co., NE.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 9, 1900, shows Elizabeth Lutz (age 58) born July 1841 in English Canada to English Canadian-born parents with all 5 of the children born to her still alive and having immigrated in 1851 is a widowed Head of Household who owns her home free of a mortgage and is living in the 2nd Ward, Abingdon City, Cedar Twp., Knox Co., IL. Living with her are her two unmarried children, both born in Illinois to Pennsylvania and Canadian-born parents: Burdette Lutz (age 20) born January 1880; and Fern D. Lutz (age 12) born August 1887. Also living there is her widowed mother: Hanna Drew (age 86) born August 1813 in English Canada to Not Known-born parents, with 5 of the 7 children born to her still alive.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 15, 1900, shows Wm. H. Brown (age 25) born January, 1875, in Nebraska to New Jersey and Nebraska-born parents, is a married Farmer, and who rents his farm, and is living in Waterloo Pct., Douglas Co., NE. Living with him is his childless wife of 0 years, Maggie Brown (age 17) born September, 1882, in Nebraska to Ohio and Iowa-born parents.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 2, 1900, shows J. W. McClintock (age 67) born March, 1833, in Indiana to Virginia-born parents, is a married Farmer, and who rents his home, and is living at 603 Ash Street, 3rd Ward, City of Ottawa, Franklin Co., KS. Living with him is his wife of 45 years, Mary McClintock (age 61) born April, 1839, in Kentucky to Kentucky-born parents, with 6 of the 11 children born to her still alive; his married son-in-law, James Hoover (age 33) born in Maryland to Maryland-born parents, a Hotel Cook; his childless daughter who has been married less than one year, Luela Hoover (age 28) born October, 1871 in Kansas to Kentucky and Indiana-born parents, a Hotel Cook; and an unmarried servant, Rebecca Gray (age 22) born May, 1878, in Kansas to Ohio-born parents, a Servant.

Hannah (Rockefeller) Drew died 1901 in Abingdon City, Cedar Twp., Knox Co., IL, at about age 88.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 16, 1910, shows Elizabeth Lutz (age 68) born in English Canada to English Canadian-born parents with all 5 of the children born to her still alive and having immigrated in 1851 and a Naturalized Citizen is a widowed Head of Household with her Own Income who owns her home free of a mortgage and is living in the 2nd Ward, Abingdon City, Cedar Twp., Knox Co., IL. Living with her are her married daughter and son-in-law: Court A. Fish (age 23) born in Illinois to Illinois-born parents, a Clerk at a Drug Company; and Court's childless wife of one year, Fern D. Fish (age 23).

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 28, 1910, shows W. J. Weston (age 49) born in England to English-born parents and having immigrated in 1868 is a General Farm Farmer Owning his farm with a mortgage and is living in Washington Twp., Johnson Co., MO. Living with him is his his wife of 17 years, Rena Weston (age 35) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents, with none of the two children born to her still alive.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on May 12, 1910, shows Wm. H. Brown (age 35) born in Nebraska to New York and Unknown-born parents, and in his first marriage, is a married General Farm Farmer, and who rents his farm, and is living in Bancroft Twp., Cuming Co., NE. Living with him are: his wife of 10 years, Maggie Brown (age 27) born in Nebraska to Pennsylvania and Iowa-born parents, and in her first marriage, and with all 4 of the children born to her still alive; his son, Oscar Brown (age 9) Nebraska to Nebraska-born parents; his son, Edward Brown (age 7) Nebraska to Nebraska-born parents; his son, Henry Brown (age 6) Nebraska to Nebraska-born parents; and his daughter, Irma Brown (age 3/12) Nebraska to Nebraska-born parents.

On September 14, 1916, Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) (Coates) Brown filed a Remarried Widow Claim.


Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) (Coates) Brown Remarried Widow Claim.


The WWI Draft Registration Report dated September 12, 1918, shows Oscar William Brown, age 18, born July 6, 1900, is living at RFD No. 1, Waterloo, Douglas Co., NE. His father is William Henry Brown of the same location.


   

Oscar William Brown WWI Draft Registration Report.


The 1920 U. S. Census taken on February 23, 1920, shows W. J. Weston (age 58) born in England to English-born parents and having immigrated in 1868 and becoming a Naturalized Citizen in 1889 is a General Farm Farmer Owning his farm free of a mortgage and is living in Washington Twp., Johnson Co., MO. Living with him is his his wife, Rene C. Weston (age 45) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 14, 1920, shows Mrs. E. R. Withee (age 40) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin and Indiana-born parents is a widowed Dressmaker who owns her home free of a mortgage and is living at 420 South River Blvd., 4th Ward, City of Independence, Blue Twp., Jackson Co., MO. Living with her are: her widowed mother, Racheal Brown (age 73) born in Indiana to United States-born parents; her son, Jos. Withee (age 15) born in Nebraska to South Dakota and Nebraska-born parents; and her son, Stanley Withee (age 13) born in Nebraska to South Dakota and Nebraska-born parents.

Joshua Sandag and Ordillia Ellen "Della" (Searfus) Gough were married December 10, 1922, in Butler, Bates Co., MO.


Joshua Sandage and Ordillia Ellen "Della" (Searfus) Gough Marriage Record.


The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 7, 1930, shows W. J. Weston (age 69) born in England to English-born parents and first married at age 32 and having immigrated in 1868 and a Naturalized Citizen is a Farmer Owning his farm and is living in Washington Twp., Johnson Co., MO. Living with him is his his wife, Rena Weston (age 55) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin-born parents and first married at age 17. Also living there is his married mother-in-law, Rachel Brown (age 84) born in Wisconsin to United States-born parents, and first married at age 20.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 8, 1930, shows Eva C. Withee (age 49) born in Nebraska to Wisconsin-born parents is a widowed Seamstress At Home who owns her home worth $6,000 and is living at 420 South River Blvd., 4th Ward, City of Independence, Blue Twp., Jackson Co., MO. Living with her is her unmarried son, Stanley C. Withee (age 23) born in Nebraska to South Dakota and Nebraska-born parents, who is a Telephone Engineer. Also living there is her widowed mother, Rachel S. Brown (age 84) born in Wisconsin to New York and Indiana-born parents.

Joshua Sandage died March 3, 1931, in Lone Oak Twp., Bates Co., MO, at age 71. Buried in Taborville, MO.


Joshua Sandage Death Record.


Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) (Coates) Brown died September 20, 1933, in Blue Twp., Jackson Co., MO, at age 87. Buried in Dorchester Cemetery, Saline Co., NE.


   

Rachael Susannah "Rachel" (Drew) (Coates) Brown Death Records.


The 1940 U. S. Census taken on May 3, 1940, shows William H. Withee (age 65) born in Nebraska, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 6 years of School, is a married Road Construction Laborer, and who lives in Rich Hill, Osage Twp., Bates Co., MO. Living with him is his wife, Oridillia Brown (age 65) born in Missouri, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 8 years of School.

William James Weston died August 20, 1940, in Washington Twp., Johnson Co., MO (age 79). Buried in Knob Noster City Cemetery, Knob Noster, Johnson Co., MO.


William James Weston Death Record.


Ordillia Ellen "Della" (Searfus) (Sandage) Brown died May 11, 1956, at Nevada City Hospital, Nevada, Vernon Co., MO, at age 81. Buried in Fairview Cemetery, Bates Co., MO.


Ordillia Ellen "Della" (Searfus) (Sandage) Brown Death Record.


William Henry Brown died June 8, 1956, at South Austin Hospital, Butler, Bates Co., MO, at age 81. Buried in Fairview Cemetery, Bates Co., MO.


William Henry Brown Death Record.


Eva Melissa (Coates) Withee died May 5, 1962, in Independence, Jackson Co., MO, at age 82. Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Douglas Co., NE.


Eva Melissa (Coates) Withee Death Record.


 

Stanley C. Withee lived until age 98.

 

Frank Jefferson Coates

One of Nebraska's pioneer bankers and executives is Frank Jefferson Coates who has been a resident of this state for over 60 years. He was born at Boscobel, Wisconsin, January 16, 1868, the son of Francis Jefferson Coates and Rachel Susanna (Drew) Coates. His father, a farmer and a Civil War veteran, 7th Wisconsin Infantry, died at Dorchester, Nebraska, January 20, 1880.

Mr. Coates attended school at Boscobel, Wisconsin, and at Dorchester. He is president of the Grand Island National Bank, the Dolan Fruit Company, and is director in the Ulry Talbert Company. He holds membership in The Nebraskana Society, is affiliated with the First Presbyterian Church of Grand Island, and is a 32nd degree Mason. He is a member of the Sons of Veterans of which he has been state commander.

Mr. Coates was united in marriage to Mary Mattes on October 12, 1887. There are four children, George Francis, Mercer Mattes, Lucile Marie, and Evelyn Ruth. Of his marriage to Harriet Evelyn Ferris the following children were born: Stanley Ferris; and Donald Robert. Mr. Coates likes to golf. Residence: Grand Island

 

I'm looking for info on David Troyer's mother, Hannah Rockefeller Troyer. She married Waldron Drew in Saline Co., NE in 1883. Do you have any info on her death/burial?

 

 

 



Hannah was the 3rd wife of Waldron Drew. He died in Saline Co., NE in Aug 1893 and is buried in Dorchester Cemetery, Saline Co., NE. Hannah is not buried with him. Waldron is in the same lot with his daughter, Rachel Drew Coates Brown and her first husband (F. Jefferson Coates) and child.

Waldron was born in Warren Co., OH 1818 married his 1st wife, Sarah Stettler in Clinton Co., IN in 1841 and then moved to Wisconsin. Sarah died in 1855 in Wisconsin and Waldron married Mazey Ann Blakely the same year. She was a widow. She and Waldron had several children together. I don't have her death date either. Anyway, Waldron was in Saline Co. with his daughter Rachel (Sarah Stettler is her mother) by 1880 or so.

Am hoping you have more info on Hannah and Waldron.

Mary Louise Townsend MLOUTOWN@Adelphia.net

 

Wilber Nebraska is the county seat of Saline County. They would have wills 
or estate papers at the Probate Court. Birth records were not kept until 
1910 and deaths sporadically in 1904. Obituaries were in the Dorchester 
Star newspaper, and copies can be obtained from the Nebraska State 
Historical Socieity at 15th & R in Lincoln Nebraska. I believe the cost is 
$5.00 for the Historical Society and Wilbur charges 50 cents for marriages 
and $5.00 for wills and estates. These places are fantastic and of great 
help.
donna

 

 

Greetings from Virginia!

I've just subscribed to the list and am looking for information on a
relative who has been very elusive. I would appreciate any help on this
family or advise on sources. Are there death certificates or probate
records available for 1893 in Saline Co.? Are there any newspaper
obituaries available for this time period?

Looking for family of Waldren Drew and his daughter Rachael Coates
Brown.

Waldron Drew, according to Dorchester Cemetery records online, was born
25 Jan 1819 and died 14 August 1893. He was born in Miami Co., Ohio,
eldest child of Abraham W. Drew and Mary Voorhis. His father, Abraham
Drew died in 1822 in Miami Co., OH and the family moved to Warren Co.,
Ohio.. He had two sisters, Margaret Drew (wife of John Clendenin) and
Martha Drew (wife of Robert Batcheler).

>From the 1850 Clinton Co., IN census, I found that Rachael was born
about 1841. By 1860 the family was in Wisconsin and lastly, I found
them in Saline Co., NE. I don't know the name of Rachael's husband.

Other children of Waldron Drew are Jacob, Mary, Sarah, John and William
Henry.
Waldron Drew married at least 2 times. First to Sarah Statler 11 May
1840 in Clinton Co., IN and second to Mazy Ann Blake from Dorchester,
Saline Co., NE. Sarah Statler Drew died in Wisconsin on 1 May 1855.

Would love to find any descendents.
Best regards to all,
Mary Louise Townsend
Potomac Falls, VA

 

 

When Confederate soldiers bore down on Gettysburg, Pa., in 1863, a quiet seminary building atop a ridge was transformed — first into a Union lookout, then a field hospital for 600 wounded soldiers. Now the structure that stood at the center of the Civil War’s bloodiest and most pivotal battle is being transformed once again. On July 1, marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, Schmucker Hall, located on the campus of Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, will reopen as a museum reflecting on the epic battle, the costly war and the complex role of faith. Seminary Ridge Museum will take visitors into the minds of those who fought and explore their conflicting ideas of freedom. Some 750,000 soldiers died during the Civil War and many of them carried and quoted from the Bible. But they read it in divergent ways that still reverberate in a polarized America. “People have found it comfortable to find a way to think about the Civil War in terms of valor and heroism,” said Barbara Franco, executive director of the museum. “We want to really look at these other parts of it — causes, consequences — and leave people thinking there’s more to this than just the simple answers." Visitors begin with a big view of the battlefields. They gaze out from the cupola where Union General John Buford viewed advancing Confederate brigades. They walk the creaking floors where wounded soldiers built back strength over a course of months. They ponder how soldiers suffered and how they made sense of it. “Here were these young men, caught up in these events, and trying to be as faithful as they could be as good Christians,” said Maria Erling, professor of church history at the seminary. “They were consoled by those faith commitments." In interactive exhibits, visitors grapple with mid-19th century moral dilemmas: Would you harbor a fugitive slave if it meant you could go to prison? What motivated nurses, such as the Catholic Daughters of Charity, to tend to the injured on both sides? Exhibits also showcase religious belongings of soldiers who fought at Gettysburg. Example: a 3-by-2-inch Bible carried by Jefferson Coates. A member of Wisconsin’s 7th Regiment and recipient of the Medal of Honor, he was blinded on the Gettysburg battlefield but survived. “The fact that he carried this Bible with him tells me a lot about him and his purpose,” said Coates’ great-granddaughter, Jean Smith of Kansas City, who donated the Bible to the seminary. “If there hadn’t been some sort of a religious context for him, he wouldn’t have carried it."

 

 

Medal of Honor awarded 63 times at Gettysburg

June 26, 2005, By Robert M. Duff

Robert M. Duff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

When thousands of Civil War re-enactors and spectators gather at Gettysburg, Pa., next weekend to commemorate the 142nd anniversary of the war's pivotal battle, the courage of their forebears will be much on their minds.

One indicator of the ferocity of the fighting at Gettysburg is the number of soldiers who received the Medal of Honor.

"The Medal of Honor was born of the need to recognize the valor of soldiers in the Civil War, and nowhere were actions of bravery and courage in the war seen more than at the Battle of Gettysburg. In all, 63 medals were awarded to soldiers for their actions on the battlefield of southern Pennsylvania," according to the introductory note in the National Park Service's The Civil War Soldier.

President Abraham Lincoln signed the law authorizing the Medal of Honor for enlisted naval personnel on Dec. 21, 1861, and for enlisted army and volunteer troops on July 12, 1862. Army officers were made eligible March 3, 1863, but naval officers didn't qualify for the decoration until World War I.

The Medal of Honor is the highest decoration awarded by the United States. It is awarded for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty."

The medal was awarded 1,527 times for heroism in the Civil War. There were several additional instances where the decoration was improperly awarded during the war, but these awards were later revoked by a military review board.

Before the Civil War, awards and decorations were not a significant part of the U.S. military scene. In the American mind, such honors were tainted by association with the values of European aristocracy. Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott, the longtime commander of the U.S. army, reflected the thinking of the early Republic when he opposed the creation of the Medal of Honor, calling it not needed.

In one way, of course, Scott was right. The courage and sacrifice of the soldiers at Gettysburg would be remembered without the Medal of Honor, but in looking at the deeds of those three days, it seems entirely appropriate that their country chose to honor them as best it could.

On the first day, July 1, 1863, Sgt. Jefferson Coates of Company H, 7th Wisconsin Infantry, was wounded during heavy fighting along McPherson's Ridge. His citation reads: "Unsurpassed courage in battle, where he had both eyes shot out," according to The Medal of Honor at Gettysburg by B. T. Arrington (Thomas Publications, Gettysburg, Pa.).

On July 2, a unique action took place in which six men of the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves acted as a single unit. Their Citation reads: "The Union troops in this area were under a constant, deadly fire whose source could not be determined for some time. It was finally discovered to be coming from a small log cabin `on the flank of the regiment.' Corporals Furman, Roush, and Smith with Sergeants Hart, Johnson, and Mears volunteered to charge the cabin and attempt to dislodge the Confederate sharpshooters." All six were awarded the Medal of Honor.

In the foreword of The Medal of Honor at Gettysburg, B. T. Arrington states, "Capturing a flag does not sound so heroic unless you know that the battle flag was considered the greatest prize on the battlefield. To lose one's flag was also a major way to destroy morale. It was considered a terrible dishonor."

Struggles for flags

About half of the Gettysburg Medal of Honor citations mention struggles over regimental colors:

Nathaniel M. Allen. Corporal. Citation: "When his regiment was falling back, this soldier, bearing the national color, returned in the face of the enemy's fire, pulled the regimental flag from under the body of its bearer, who had fallen, saved the flag from capture, and brought both colors off the field."

Elijah W. Bacon. Private. Citation: "Capture of flag of 16th North Carolina Regiment."

Morris Brown Jr. Citation: "Capture of flag."

Hugh Carey. Sergeant. Citation: "Captured the flag of the 7th Virginia Infantry, being twice wounded in the effort."

Harrison Clark. Corporal, Citation: "Seized the colors and advanced with them after the color bearer had been shot."

John E. Clopp, Private. Citation: "Capture of flag of 9th Virginia Infantry, wresting it from the color bearer."

Joseph H. De Castro. Corporal. Citation: "Capture of flag of 19th Virginia Regiment."

George H. Dore. Sergeant. Citation: "The colors being struck down by a shell as the enemy were charging, this soldier rushed out and seized the flag, exposing himself to the fire of both sides."

Benjamin F. Falls. Color sergeant. Citation: "Capture of flag."

Christopher Flynn. Corporal. Citation: "Capture of flag of 52d North Carolina Infantry."

Edward L. Gilligan. First sergeant. Citation: "Assisted in the capture of a Confederate flag by knocking down the color sergeant."

 

 

Henry Douglass Brown (age 27) Born February 10, 1904, in Valley, NE, and previously married, and Hildreth Brainard (born in Valley, NE) were married June 24, 1930, in Council Bluffs, IA.

Henry Douglass Brown died April 4, 1990, in Calloway Co., KY, at age 86.

Hildreth (Brainard) Brown was born March 5, 1912, in Nebraska, and died August 19, 1995, in Dexter, Calloway Co., KY (age 83).

 

Oscar William Brown was born July 6, 1900, Nebraska. Married about 1923 to Ellen E. Unknown: Born about 1904 in Nebraska. Their son, Dale R. Brown, was born about 1924 in Nebraska.