Lenore Shirley Abbey




Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel was born September 8, 1927, in Zap, Mercer Co., ND. He is the son of Harry Elmer Wetzel of Canton, Lincoln Co., SD, and Frances Willard Werner of Elmore, Faribault Co., MN.

Lenore Shirley Abbey was born April 29, 1930, in Mercer Co., ND, and died February 26, 2003, at Sakakawea Medical Center, Hazen, Mercer Co., ND, at age 72. Buried in Saint Joseph's Catholic Cemetery, Mercer Co., ND. She is the daughter of Oran Ralph Abbey of Milladore, Wood Co., WI, and Alice Frances Herman of Glen Ullin, Mercer Co., ND.

Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and Lenore Shirley Abbey were married August 13, 1949,  in the Winter Chapel of St. Joseph's Church Catholic Church, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND.

Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel had five children:

  1. Kay Donnette Wetzel: Born in Hazen, Mercer Co., ND. Married (1) November 25, 1977, at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, to Arthur William "Art" Smith: Born in Ohio. Divorced about 2000 in Unknown. Married (2) December 27, 2003, in Brazoria Co., TX, to Bryce Bryan Koslan: Born in Harris Co., TX.
  2. Barry David Wetzel: Born in Hazen, Mercer Co., ND. Married September 5, 1981, in or near Unakleet, AK, to Dee Dee Haugen: Born in Unknown.
  3. Kim Donald Wetzel: Born in Hazen, Mercer Co., ND. Married October 30, 1981, at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, to Vicki Lynn Quast: Born in Unknown.
  4. Marsha Dion Wetzel: Born in Hazen, Mercer Co., ND. Married July 7, 1984, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, to Carey David Johnson: Born in Unknown.
  5. Elizabeth Anne "Beth" Wetzel: Born in Hazen, Mercer Co., ND. Married December 26, 1984, in Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, to Jeri M. Jankowski: Born in Unknown.



TIMELINE

The link below goes to some North Dakota newspapers. Please use the Chrome browser for best results:

http://ndarchives.advantage-preservation.com


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel, May 14, 2020. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


William Andrew Wetzel family history as told by his son, Lewis Andrew Wetzel.


Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel is buried in Saint Joseph's Catholic Cemetery, Mercer Co., ND. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


Lowell Ellsworth Smith and Marguerite Alice (Pfaff) Smith are buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


   

Left to Right: Ann Eliza Werner holding cat, Gwendolyn Werner, and Frances Willard Werner, North Dakota, 1911. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: Gwendolyn was born February 5, 1895, and died August 5, 1923, in Minneapolis. She went to Jamestown College in Jamestown, ND. She was married April 3, 1920, in Minneapolis to Carlton Staley (born September 27, 1896, and died November 15, 1968, in Portland, OR). They had a daughter, Mary Alice Staley (born August 16, 1922, and died September 24, 1922). They adopted a son Carlton Staley, Jr. (born May 7, 1921, in Minneapolis, and died February 10, 2009, Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai, ID)My Dad always enjoyed the visits from Carlton and Carlton Staley, Jr.


Frances Willard Werner, North Dakota, 1913. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: Grandmother Frances Willard Werner Wetzel, the one that was protesting on the Zap mine railroad in the newspaper article, also protested when a rail line was going to build on her parent's farm near Hazen, ND. In some way my grandmother was a little bit of a suffragette, although she didn't believe in drinking.


Helen Werner, Frances' Beau (Ross? Unknown), and Frances Willard Werner, ca. 1918, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: My Grandmother, Frances Willard (Werner) Wetzel, had a fiancÚ of unknown name who died in WWI. My grandmother had her wedding dress picked out, and a cousin now has it. 


Sisters Frances Willard Werner and Gwendolyn "Gwen" Werner, North Dakota, 1920. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: I have a picture of Gwen. She is on the right - my grandmother wrote on the photo.


Carleton Staley, Jr., 1926. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: Attached is Carlton, Jr. as a child.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel was born September 8, 1927, in Zap, Mercer Co., ND.

Lowell Ellsworth Smith and Mary Gertrude (Coffman) Fry were married August 22, 1928, in Huntington, Cabell Co., WV.


Lowell Ellsworth Smith and Mary Gertrude (Coffman) Fry Marriage Record.


Lenore Shirley Abbey was born April 29, 1930, in Mercer Co., ND.

The 1930 U.S. Census taken on April 17, 1930, shows Harry Wetzel (age 29) born in South Dakota to Indiana and Illinois-born parents, and first married at age 24, is a Coal Mine Laborer, and who owns his home worth $500 and is living in Mercer Co., ND. Living with him are: his wife, Frances Wetzel (age 30) born in Minnesota to Minnesota-born parents, and first married at age 25; his son, Dale A. Wetzel (age 4-6/12) born in North Dakota to South Dakota and Minnesota-born parents; and his son, Donald H. Wetzel (age 2-6/12) born in North Dakota to South Dakota and Minnesota-born parents.

The 1930 U.S. Census taken on April 30, 1930, shows Oran Abbey (age 29) born in Wisconsin to Wisconsin-born parents, and first married at age 25, is a married General Farm Farmer, and who owns his own farm worth $500 and is living in T143, R88, Mercer Co., ND. Living with him are: his wife, Alice Abbey (age 28) born in North Dakota to German and West Virginia-born parents, and first married at age 24; his daughter, Lois Abbey (age 3) born in North Dakota to Wisconsin and North Dakota-born parents; and his daughter, June Abbey (age 1) born in North Dakota to Wisconsin and North Dakota-born parents.


Sisters, Lois, June, Lenore and Marilyn Abbey, about 1933. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Cleo Herman and Lenore Shirley Abbey, North Dakota, 1934. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Lenore, Lois, June, and Marilyn Abbey, North Dakota, 1934. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

 Lois, June, Lenore, Marilyn, Gale and Donna Abbey, North Dakota, about 1935. The farm cat, with tail raised, is at the lower left. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Lenore, Gale and Marilyn Abbey at home, about 1935. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Sisters, Lenore and Donna Abbey at home, about 1936. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Sisters, Lois, June, Lenore and Marilyn Abbey, about 1936. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Sisters, Lois, June, Lenore and Marilyn Abbey at Lenore and Marilyn's first Communion, 1937. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Left to Right: Donna, Marilyn, June, Lenore, Gale, and Lois Abbey, on the family farm, about 1938. The Abbey photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

The picture to the right is a stock photo of a 1937 Chevrolet Master Deluxe 2 Door Sedan.

Kay Koslan comments: I remember visiting here when the root cellar (to the left of the Abbey children) was there, and there was also an outhouse. The outhouse was no longer there. The door in the background was likely the front door. The Abbey kids are either going to school or to church, I'll bet.


Grade 5 1938-1939, Lenore Abbey, 2nd from left, 2nd row. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Grades 3 - 4, 1939 - 1940 Marilyn Abbey, Grade 4, top row, 6th from left, and Lenore Abbey, Grade 5, middle row, 6th from left. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


The 1940 U. S. Census taken on April 24, 1940, shows Harry Wetzel (age 38) born in South Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 7 years of School, is a married Steam Engine Runner in a Coal Mine, and who owns his home worth $800 and is living in Zap, Mercer Co., ND. Living with him are: his wife, Frances Wetzel (age 40) born in Minnesota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 2 years of High School; his son, Dale A. Wetzel (age 14) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 8 years of School; his son, Donald H. Wetzel (age 12) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 6 years of School; his son, Robert D. Wetzel (age 9) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 3 years of School; and his son, James F. Wetzel (age 7) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 1 year of School.

The 1940 U. S. Census taken on April 9, 1940, shows Orran Abbey (age 39) born in Wisconsin, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 1 year of College, and who married but has no occupation listed, is renting his home for $15/month, and is living in the Village of Beulah, Mercer Co., ND. Living with him are: his wife, Alice Abbey (age 38) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 2 years of College; his daughter, Lois Abbey (age 13) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 7 years of School; his daughter, Lois Abbey (age 13) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 7 years of School; his daughter, June Abbey (age 11) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 5 years of School; his daughter, Lenore Abbey (age 10) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 3 years of School; his daughter, Marilyn Abbey (age 9) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 2 years of School; his son, Gale Abbey (age 7) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 0 years of School; his daughter, Dona Abbey (age 5) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 0 years of School; his son, James Abbey (age 2) born in North Dakota; his daughter, Colleen Abbey (age 5/12) born in North Dakota; and an unmarried Servant, Roger Endresson (age 21) born in North Dakota, and 5 years ago was living in the Same Place, and with 4 years of High School, a Common Laborer in a Farming Mine.


The entire Oran Ralph Abbey family, taken just before Oran died in 1943. Back row, left to right: Lois, Alan, Oran, Alice, June; Middle row, left to right: Lenore, Donna, Gale and Marilyn; Front row, left to right: Colleen, Jim. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Below is a link to the "Beulah, North Dakota Golden '50' Years Anniversary, 1914-1964":

http://www.odessa3.org/collections/towns/link/beulah64.txt


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel's Zap High School graduation picture, 1945. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel's Merchant Marine picture, 1945. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Koslan comments: At one time Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel taught in a one-room schoolhouse south of Beulah, between 1946-1947. They must have been playing around in the picture because the children are all smiling. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lenore Abbey, Gert Strecker, Doris Strecker, and Rae Janice Richardson, about 1945. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Lenore Shirley Abbey's Beulah High School graduation picture, about 1949. The picture at the right is an animated MP4 file. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Leonard Frank "Bud" Pulver and Gertrude "Gert" Strecker wedding, with Lenore Abbey and Don Wetzel, Hazen, Mercer Co., ND, December 6, 1947. Black and white photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and Lenore Shirley Abbey were married August 13, 1949, in the Winter Chapel of St. Joseph's Church Catholic Church, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND.


The Beulah Independent, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, Thursday, August 18, 1949

ABBEY - WETZEL

In a single ring ceremony performed by Father Raymond Guillozet in the Winter Chapel of the St. Joseph's Church at Beulah, Saturday, Aug. 13, at 10 a.m., Miss Lenore Abbey, daughter of Mrs. Alice Abbey of Beulah, became the bride of Donald Wetzel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wetzel, of Zap Strip Mine. The bride wore a gray tweed suit with white accessories. She wore a corsage of red roses, and carried a rosary which had belonged to her maternal grandmother. She received a rhinestone necklace and bracelet from the groom. Miss Marilyn Abbey was her sister's only attendant. She wore a beige suit with white accessories and wore a corsage of red roses. James Wetzel attended his brother. Mrs. Abbey, mother of the bride wore a blue figured dress and Mrs. Wetzel, mother of the groom, wore navy blue. The both wore corsages of white carnations. After the ceremony a dinner was held at the home of the bride's mother, for the members of the immediate families. A reception was held at the Dreamland Pavilion in the afternoon for about 100 guests. The bridal table decorated with white garden flowers and centered with a three tierd wedding cake topped with a miniature bride and groom. The bride is a 1949 graduate of Beulah High School and is employed part time as a clerk in the Super Valu Store. The groom is a 1946 graduate of Zap High School and is meter man for the Montana Dakota Utilities Office. After a two week's honeymoon in Yellowstone Park, the newlyweds will be at home in Beulah. On July 28th, the bride was given a pre-nuptial shower at the home of Mrs. Bud Pulver. Hostesses were Mrs. Pulver, Mrs. Dale Wetzel and Mrs. Bill Krecklau.


   

Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and Lenore Shirley Abbey were married August 13, 1949, in Beulah, Mercer Co., ND. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel and Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel, 1950. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Frances Willard (Werner) Wetzel, at her protest during the United Mine Workers strike at the Dakota Collieries Co. lignite mine, Zap, Mercer Co., ND, June 10, 1950. Photo courtesy Los Angeles Times.

Comments about the strike from Jim Abbey, courtesy of his niece, Kay Koslan:

Comments about the strike on Jun 9, 2016, from Jim Abbey, courtesy of his niece, Kay Koslan:

​The scabs got thru the picket line and all they needed was empty coal cars to fill. The women laid on the tracks to stop the coal cars. The engineer said he would not run over women so he took his train with coal cars and left. I was there. The highway patrol lifted my mom off the tracks. She bit one in the ankle, the pic was shown worldwide. Mom got letters from woman from several nations thinking she was doing it for women's rights. We all had fun throwing rotten eggs at the scabs. See Bismarck Tribune April 16, 1975, 25 years later. Minneapolis  Tribune, Sunday June 11, 1950, Page 25.​ 

​Evidently, that's my grandmother lying down in the photo, according to my Uncle Jim.

I asked my Dad about fox farms. My Dad said his father had silver foxes. They had separate pen areas for each one. They had about 7 foxes and kept them for 12 years. They would each have 3-7 baby foxes. Then when they were a certain age - they would sell the furs. Dad said that farmers would have to kill their old horses and this meat was used to feed the foxes. They did not have silver foxes in ND but my Grandfather Wetzel probably got them from Canada. They were more desirable because they had thicker fur. My Grandfather Wetzel was interesting. He'd hide the whiskey out in the garage because my grandmother did not believe in drinking alcohol. They both were quite interesting. She once laid over the railroad in an Indian costume on her father's land because she didn't want the railroad to come through. Another time something happened at Zap coal mine and she protested and wouldn't move. She may have been about 50 or so. They tried to carry her off and she bit the policeman. It was in the paper. My Grandpa Wetzel would "water witch" with a willow. People would call him to do it and he would find water.


Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel, Kay Donnette Wetzel, Donna Clara Abbey, and Charles Gale Abbey, April or May, 1951. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: Left to Right: In the reddish brown hair is my mother, Lenore. Then Donna Abbey holding me, and my uncle Gale Abbey. Note that Donna has very dark hair and eyes.  If it's true that we are part Irish, then it fits. I am told by someone from Dad's side that they are called the "lack Irish." This is not "African" but just dark hair, skin, eyes. There were quite a few Abbeys, that to me, had a dark complexion, not just in my direct family, such as my mother. 


Kay Donnette Wetzel. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel, 1951. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel, 1951. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel, 1951. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel and Kay Donnette Wetzel, 1952. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


The December, 1952, Christmas gathering at the Charles George Herman house, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND. The people, from left to right clockwise, are: Colleen Theresa Abbey, Arvid Rudolf Gustafson, Charles George Herman, an empty chair, Alice Frances (Herman) Abbey, an occupied chair with James Gerald Abbey, and Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel. Other family members present but not in the picture are: Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel, Marilyn Adell (Abbey) Gustafson, Alan Lee Abbey, Kay Donnette Wetzel, and Barry David Wetzel. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Barry David Wetzel and Kay Donnette Wetzel, 1953. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Alice Frances (Herman) Abbey, Kay Donnette Wetzel, Charles George Herman, Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel, and Barry Wetzel, October, 1953. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


           

Kay Donnette Wetzel in front of her great-grandfather Charles George Herman's house, 1954. His Olympic Blue Metallic 1950 Buick Special Sedanette Fastback is shown in the background. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan. A typical 1950 Buick Special Sedanette Fastback is shown in the next two pictures, and another 1950 Buick in Olympic Blue Metallic is shown on the right. The color choices in 1950 are shown below.


   

Barry David Wetzel and Kay Donnette Wetzel, 1954. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Barry David Wetzel, Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel, and Kay Donnette Wetzel, with Northern Pike, 1954. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Harry Elmer Wetzel and Frances Willard (Werner) Wetzel extended family, North Dakota, 1954. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kim Donald Wetzel, 1955. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel, Kim Donald Wetzel, and Barry David Wetzel, 1955. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel and Barry David Wetzel in snow, 1955. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Mike Dolce, Barry Wetzel, Kay Wetzel, and Vanessa Dolce, 1956. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kim Wetzel, Barry Wetzel, and Kay Wetzel, December, 1956. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Wetzel climbing the hall wall, May, 1957. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Siblings Barry David Wetzel, Kim Donald Wetzel, and Kay Donnette Wetzel, in the Wetzel house on Highway 49, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1957. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel, 1st Communion, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1958. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel, Barry David Wetzel and Kim Donald Wetzel at Barry's 1st Communion, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1959. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Sons-in-law: Loren Lang, Alice (Herman) Abbey, Arvid Gustafson, Don Wetzel, at Alice's house, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1959. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Sons: Jim Abbey, Alan Abbey, Alice (Herman) Abbey, and Gale Abbey, at Alice's house, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1959. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Cousins: Back Row: Cindy Gustafson, Barry Wetzel, Vanessa Dolce, Kay Wetzel, Douglas Lang. Front Row: Kim Wetzel, Mike Dolce, Dean Lang, David Lang, Gary Dolce, Diane Lang, Jan Gustafson. Photo taken Alice's house, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1959. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Don Wetzel, Lenore Abbey Wetzel, baptismal sponsors for Mark Gustafson, 1961. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Picnic at Alice Abbey's backyard, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, July, 1963. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

​Back row, Left to right: Alice (Herman) Abbey, bent over eating; Donna (Abbey) Stasil; Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel; June (Abbey) Dolce; Jan (Welk) Abbey; Marilyn (Abbey) Gustafson; Don Wetzel; and Stan Stasil​.

Row 2, left to right: Barry Wetzel (lower left corner); and Mike Dolce, rust shirt, back seen and standing.​

​Row 3, left to right: front to back: Stephanie Stasil, sitting in high chair; Gary Dolce, almost hidden behind Stephanie Stasil; Cindy Gustafson; and Mark Gustafson, with bib.​

Front row, left to right: Diane Lang, facing forward, Pink shorts; Kay Wetzel, facing back with orange drink, blue shirt; and Jan Gustafson, lower right corner, barely in the picture.​

Kay Koslan comments: It looked my brother Barry Wetzel and my cousin Mike Dolce were up to no good because they had a long white cord. But then I recognized it was a type of child harness attached to Mark Gustafson at the front end so he wouldn't run off into the street! The only thing Barry and Mike were doing were holding onto that cord. I think it was attached to my Grandma Alice's clothes line, as they often did that to protect the kids from running off. This was especially important because there were 33 grandchildren. There were probably at least 20 in this gathering.


First cousins born in 1961; July, 1963, North Dakota. From left to right: Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel with Marsha Wetzel; Colleen (Abbey) Flemmer with Marie Flemmer; Marilyn (Abbey) Gustafson with Mark Gustafson; June (Abbey) Dolce with Tammy Dolce; and Donna (Abbey) Stasil with Stephanie Stasil. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Card playing in 1964 at the Alice Abbey home - a winter sport! From left to right: Alice Abbey (behind Don); Don Wetzel (glasses); Marilyn (Abbey) Gustafson; Jim Abbey; Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel; Jan (Welk) Abbey; Alan Abbey. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


The Pink Frosting House. Alice Abbey in back, 206 East Main Street, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, Summer, 1966.

The Abbey children cousins; Front row, Left to Right: Jan Gustafson, Larry Flemmer, Denise Lang?, Tammy Dolce, Sandy Flemmer, Stephanie Stasil, Mark Gustafson, Beth Wetzel, Gina Abbey, and Paul Flemmer. Back row, Left to Right: Vanessa Dolce, Mike Dolce, Gary Dolce, Kim Wetzel, Barry Wetzel, Cindy Gustafson (holding Scott Stasil), Kay Wetzel, Marsha Wetzel, and Marie Flemmer.


Kay Donnette Wetzel, Junior Class picture, Beulah High School, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1968.


   

Kay Donnette Wetzel was in the North Dakota State University Marching Band in 1970. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel was in the Kappa Delta Sorority at North Dakota State University in 1972. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Kay Donnette Wetzel was in the Guidon Military Service Sorority at North Dakota State University in 1972. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


   

Left to Right: Faye Krueger of Hettinger, 1st Place; Lenore Wetzel of Beulah, 2nd place; and LaDean Moen of Hettinger, Consolation  Winner, July 15, 1975. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

The Bismarck Tribune, Bismarck, Burleigh Co., ND, Tuesday, July 15, 1975

Regent Gal Wins Sand Greens Title


The Donald and Lenore Wetzel home under construction Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, 1977. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

       

The Donald and Lenore Wetzel home, after construction Beulah, Mercer Co., ND. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: The house in the field. Their house shows only wood at the time. The entire area developed soon after with the elementary school across the way and many streets behind them, due to the Coal Gasification Plant that was built north of Beulah. Somewhere I have picture of their house with them in front of it, but not sure where and certainly not scanned.

Thinking back one night, I remembered how industrious they were. They lived in a small town. Though Dad had one of the better paying jobs in town, we still did not have a lot of money. But probably because my Mom grew up for years on a farm (they didn't move into town until after 1943, possibly 1947) and Dad's father was a coal miner so Dad did all kinds of things - he fished, hunted, trapped minks, foxes, and raccoons, worked in the Forest Service in Idaho. My Mom came up with the idea of a garden when they moved to the house we grew up in. Dad soon took over and we had an 1/2 acre or more of corn, watermelon, cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, muskmelon, asparagus, peas, cauliflower, green peppers and whatever he was testing out. We all had to help hoe. One summer, my brothers had the idea of throwing ripe tomatoes at the neighbors brick wall. That didn't go over well. I guess they had to clean it off. Mom would can as much as she could, including buying peaches and pears for canning. Then add chokecherry and buffalo berry jam, cucumber and crabapple pickles.

Then Dad added honey to the garden because of what he read about the "marvels of honey" and pollinating his vegetables. Thankfully, it didn't last long because those little bees stung real well and I'd run up to the house and away from the bees, just having got a bee sting. Dad turned the honey bees into his next hobby, aside from his fruit trees in the front yard. We all helped with the honey.  My brothers at the "Honey House" and where they extracted the honey, my mom and I washing jars in scalding soap and water and labeling jars for the Spring Creek Apiary honey. People would come to our house to buy the honey and the farmers loved the hives on their land. Dad only put hives on sweet clover land as he considered the best honey, according to his monthly bee books. Dad still recounts today his 53 barrels of honey (52 gallons) 600 lb/barrel at his peak season. He sold all his bee equipment to a place in South Dakota and the "Honey House" finally after Mom passed away, much to our sadness. But this summer I was lucky enough to find some sweet clover honey near Mt. Rushmore, SD and it tastes just as good.  

Dad used his fishing skills so we had the best Northern Pike and Walleye. He shot deer, mostly for making deer sausage, as none of us liked just as deer meat. One year, we all got leather coats and gloves from the deer my brothers and Dad had caught. Dad always took the local priests with him, when we were older. They loved the sport of it.  When Dad was still fur trapping, he used the money usually for Christmas presents. One year we had the biggest Christmas ever - we each got bicycles. That was Barry, Kim and myself. Wouldn't you know it - in the Spring someone saw the shiny new bicycles sitting in our yard and stole them.   

Dad was always learning new things. Mom would get tired of the magazines laying around. Field and Stream, Bee books, National Geographic. Some things were different. He decided to take Algebra (which he didn't have in High School) and really enjoyed it. He was always a Math whiz and he would spout it before us. Thus, at least three of took careers, requiring Math skills. When Mom became sick with cancer, Dad took a computer class at the High School. He really learned a lot. He kept active with email jokes, Word and Excel, while Mom was sick. Because Dad was a story-teller, we got him to record the stories. He did this while Mom was sick to pass the time.

Mom was as hard a worker as Dad. She took on mowing the yard the way she thought it should be done. She was a crocheter, knitter, seamstress, quilter. She sewed many of our clothes when we were little. She was very detail-oriented. If it was not perfect, she'd rip out stitches. In later years she did counted cross-stitch and ceramics. Her counted cross-stitch was perfect and far more detail that I wanted to do at 18 stitches per inch. She cross-stitched the "Lord's Supper" in perfect detail. She loved painting the ceramics and had an eye for it.

Sometimes, she had other ideas. Like one time, Mom wanted one hallway wall taken out. Dad came home to find Mom had taken out the wall with a sledge hammer. Dad had no choice but to build her a bookcase on the other side of the hall. Now Mom had more space. Then she tackled a new couch and chair she wanted. She and Dad made the framework and springs. Mom upholstered both. That couch and chair, built back in 1967, still exists and in perfect condition because of the materials they used. In fact, the renter in Dad's house asked if she could buy the "retro couch" because she loved it.

She also decided what the new house would look like. She took out some freezer wrapper paper and then drew it out. Though the outside was a rectangle, she did some layouts different than most. Actually, it worked out good, for my 2 sisters who ended up in the basement bedrooms, for any laundry room noise, pantry and for Dad coming in from the garden. The house was very well built with 2x6 walls. Dad did the insulating, plumbing and electrical. Mom did all the taping and paint walls. She stained and finished all the doors and trim.  It still looks good today. She was really proud of that house. Because they were so industrious, they paid cash for the house, which was good at that time, some 42 years ago.  

Mom was quite a joker, just like her mother. What else do large families do but pull pranks on each other? My two year old little sister hit her one time. So Mom pretended like she was crying and got some ketchup on her leg and showed it to my little sister. I don't think it had any impact on my sister though. She and her friends would dress up for Halloween but that was part of their bowling team. She was very athletic - she bowled and she golfed. She was both a very good golfer and a bowler. Those were part of her outlets from taking care of us kids. She was an excellent cook. We never starved. Actually we had to have eaten better than most. We had a quarter beef every year, though I complained, why did we have to have steak. All the other kids got hamburgers. I am not sure where we got the chickens, but Dad chopped the heads off and Mom defeathered them, then singed the rest of it off.

There were always cookies in the freezer for us and for company. We all had a sweet tooth, probably because of Mom. She baked fruit pies (juneberry being a favorite) and Kuchen. And we all loved her Fleischkeukle, which was a lot of work, made from dough shaped into half-crescents - filled with onion, hamburger, egg and then fried. Served simply with ketchup and a side of her home made coleslaw. (My Uncle Jim came one time and she fooled him real good. His Fleischkeukle contained shredded newspaper. We all got a good laugh out of it, including Uncle Jim. She knew there would be pay back, but not sure when or where.)

Mom was much quieter than Dad, except for laughing at us kids. She did talk but not half as much as Dad did. She loved having children and was so proud of us all. It was very important to her that we all went to college, probably because she didn't go. Mom was also very religious. I guess she got it from my Grandma Alice Herman Abbey and her grandmother Frances Tavis Herman. We all went to the Catholic church, for sure. It was a nice thing that developed when we kids were all adults out of the house and Mom and Dad would invite the local priest and another couple for a dinner and to play cards on a cold winter North Dakota night.  

She was such a card player, probably because it was one of the things she and her siblings could do together. The Abbey siblings would stay up and play until 2 in the morning. This was when one or more of the Abbey sisters or brothers (who no longer lived in Beulah) would come home for the summer. Oh, and they had time to catch up with their sister or brother into those wee hours. One morning I saw my Mom and Aunt June coming up from our big garden. It was morning. They had been up all night and were now admiring the garden. All of the Abbey first cousins (children of the Abbey children) loved to come home to join the camaraderie, whether it be a picnic, watching the grown-ups play card, sleep-overs at a cousin's house or just plain goofing off. A few years ago, we had an Abbey reunion with all of the adult Abbey children and cousin's that could make it. They loved it, only to say when are we going to have the next one? Unfortunately, I was the planner and I have just not taken it on yet. I think it would be much more difficult as several of the Abbey children have passed away or have dementia. But there is not doubt the Abbey cousins want to keep the memories of the fun time in days bygone.


Arthur William Smith and Kay Donnette Wetzel were married November 25, 1977, at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND.


The Bismarck Tribune, Bismarck, Burleigh Co., ND, Monday, December 5, 1977

Wetzel - Smith

Kay Donnette Wetzel married Arthur William Smith at 2 p.m. Nov. 25 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Beulah, with the Rev. Harold Roth officiating. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Don Wetzel, Beulah, and the bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Smith, Cincinnati, Ohio. The bride was attended by her sisters, Marsha and Beth, both of Beulah. Serving the bridegroom were Walter Anderson White, Ann Arbor, Mich., and Barry Wetzel, Beulah. Mrs. Smith is a home economics graduate of North Dakota State University. She is employed by Woodland Hills Apartments, Ann Arbor. Smith graduated from the University of Michigan with a Ph.D. in philosophy and is manager of Maize and Blue Management in Ann Arbor. The couple is at home in Ann Arbor.

Lowell Ellsworth Smith was born October 9, 1905, in the Village of Palmyra, Macoupin Co., IL, and died February 5, 1986, in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH, at age 80. Buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH.

Mary Gertrude Coffman was born July 16, 1902, in Neutral Strip, Cabell Co., WV, and died February, 1989, in Huntington, Cabell Co., WV, at age 86. Her last marriage, was to Unknown Thompson. In 1936, Mrs. Mary Smith was a clerk for Jennings Ice Cream & Pastry Shop, and was a householder at 1938 10th av in Huntington. In 1943, Mrs. Mary G. Smith was a saleswoman for Jennings Pastry Shop, and was a householder at 812-1/2 10th, in Huntington. In 1947, Mrs. Mary Smith was a Baker for Jennings Pastry Shop, and was a householder at 816 14th, in Huntington.

Lowell Ellsworth Smith, of 3227 Colerain Avenue, Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH, deserted his wife, Mary Gertrude (Coffman) (Fry) Smith, in 1932.

Marguerite Alice Pfaff was born October 6, 1912, in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH, and died January 31, 2005, at a nursing home, Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH, at age 92. Buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH.

Lowell E. Smith, 33, 3123 Spring Grove Avenue, salesman, and Marguerite S. Pfaff, 26, Race Road, Manager, took out a Marriage License about June 19, 1939, in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH.

Lowell Ellsworth Smith and Marguerite Alice Pfaff were married June 28, 1939, in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH.


The Beulah Beacon, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, Thursday, December 8, 1977

Kay Wetzell, Smith Are Wed

Miss Kay Dokoslannnette Wetzel and Arthur William Smith, Ann Arbor, Mich., were united in marriage at the St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Beulah, with Father Harold Roth performing the mass, on Nov. 25 at 2 p.m. Parents of the couple are Mr. and Mrs. Don Wetzel, Beulah, and Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Smith, Cincinnati, Ohio. Organist was Dick Grosz, Dickinson, Diana Grosz, Dickinson, was the soloist. The bride, given in marriage by her father, wore a straight-length dress of silk. Maid of honor was Marsha Wetzel, sister of the bride. Bridesmaid was Beth Wetzel. Best man was Walter Anderson White, of Ann Arbor, Mich. Groomsman was Barry Wetzel, Beulah.


Frances Willard (Werner) Wetzel and Alice Frances (Herman) Abbey, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, December 25, 1978. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Kay Koslan comments: The couch was the one my dad built and my mom upholstered. Not exactly a favorite color for me, but at the time it was probably a popular color. They recovered it a year or two later, though it is in the house today. It will soon to go with the new owners.


Abbey brothers and sisters at their mother's, Alice Frances (Herman) Abbey, funeral, St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, April 1, 1982.


Robert Duane Wetzel died December 8, 2012, in Yuma, Yuma Co., AZ, at age 81.


The Yuma Sun, Yuma, Yuma Co., AZ, December 15, 2012

Robert Duane Wetzel

Robert Duane Wetzel passed on peacefully on December 8, 2012. He was born on June 16, 1930. Robert served in the U.S. Navy in the Korean War. Following his service in the Navy, he moved back to his home state of North Dakota. He worked in the Power Plant industry for his entire career beginning in North Dakota, later moving to Louisiana, then to Kansas, finally to Utah from whence he retired. He had many passions in his life. In his younger years, he enjoyed pheasant hunting and fishing. After moving to Utah, he became a rock hound and enjoyed digging for fossils. He had a continued zeal for service in the American Legion throughout his life, serving as an honor guard for many veterans' funerals. His father and mother (Harry and Frances Wetzel) and his brother (Dale Wetzel) preceded Robert in passing. His brothers (Donald and James), his three sons (Kyle, Ross, and Bradley Wetzel), and three grandchildren (Francine, Kevin, and Tyler) survive him. Service will be held for Robert on Tuesday, December 19, 2012 at 1:00 P.M. at Gila Mountain Methodist Church located at 12716 N. Frontage Rd. Yuma, AZ. A quiet ceremony will be held in the summer of 2013 in Beulah ND to bring his remains to where his parents are buried. Memorials may be given to the Disabled American Veterans or to the Gila Mountain Methodist Church of Yuma AZ.


This article from the Sunday, October 19, 1986, edition of the Bismarck Tribune newspaper contained a story about the long commute Kay Donnette (Wetzel) had as she pursued another college degree.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel tending his bee hives, 1993. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Barry David Wetzel and Kim Donald Wetzel tending bee hives, 1993. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel and Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel, July 30, 1995. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


The old part of Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel's honey house, where the honey was extracted honey, burned down in 1996. The new section, which contained all the extraction equipment, was not significantly damaged. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Left to Right: Jan (Welk) Abbey, Lois (Abbey) Lang, Alan Abbey, Marilyn (Abbey) Gustafson, and Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel, at Greg Abbey's wedding, October 11, 1996, Burleigh Co., ND. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel, 1997. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


The new house of Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel, 1997. Dusky is an interested observer. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


The 1998 Abbey sibling reunion, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.

Left to Right, Back Row: Alan Abbey, and Gale Abbey.

Left to Right, Middle Row: Jan (Welk) Abbey, Alicia Abbey, Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel, Donald Wetzel, Lois (Abbey) Lang, and Lorraine (Thompson) (Boeck) Abbey.

Left to Right, Front Row: June (Abbey) Dolce, Arvid Gustafson, and Marilyn (Abbey) Gustafson.


Wetzel family picnic in the park, summer, 2001. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Sally Pulver, Inez Sommers and Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel, at Lenore's home, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, January 20, 2003. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lenore (Abbey) Wetzel and Donald Wetzel, at their home, Beulah, Mercer Co., ND, February 16, 2003. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel died February 26, 2003, at Sakakawea Medical Center, Hazen, Mercer Co., ND, at age 72. Buried in Saint Joseph's Catholic Cemetery, Mercer Co., ND.


The Bismarck Tribune, Bismarck, Burleigh Co., ND, February 28, 2003

Lenore Wetzel

BEULAH - Lenore Wetzel, 72, Beulah, died Feb. 26, 2003, at a Hazen medical center, following a long illness. Services will be held at 10 a.m. MST Saturday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Beulah, with the Rev. Charles Zins officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Visitation will be held from 3 to 6 p.m. MST today at Seibel Funeral Home, Beulah. A vigil service will be held at 7 p.m. MST today at the church. On Feb. 26, 2003, Lenore Shirley Abbey Wetzel entered into the glorious presence of the Lord. After a five-year battle with lung cancer, she is now healed from all disease. Throughout her life, Lenore was devoted to God, attending St. Joseph Catholic Church. Her life mirrored the woman of Proverbs 31:10-31. She was resourceful, hard working and of strong character. She was an ideal wife and mother. Lenore was born April 29, 1930, in Beulah to Oran Ralph Abbey and Alice Francis Herman Abbey. She was the third oldest of nine children, and spent her youth on a farm south of Beulah. On Aug. 13, 1949, she married Harry Donald Wetzel, of Zap, in Beulah. She remained in Beulah all of her life, raising five children, Kay Wetzel Smith, Barry Wetzel, Kim Wetzel, Marsha Wetzel Johnson and Beth Wetzel Jankowski. For several years she also helped raise three of her grandchildren, Tyson Jankowski and Sarah and Josh Smith. Most of Lenore's time was spent taking care of her household and raising her family. When she found the time, she used her God-given talents to enrich her home and families' lives by sewing, knitting, painting, ceramics and stitched the most intricate cross stitch patterns. She enjoyed bowling, participating in a league for many years. Later in life, when family time allowed, she began golfing and also joined the golf league. She was a good cook and spent many of her days feeding family and relatives. After meals, everyone enjoyed playing cards. She was very fun-loving and brought joy and laughter to those around her. Lenore loved playing practical jokes on her family and others she loved. She was known as "Whistler" by many in the community, because she was always cheerful and whistling. As a result, her mother, Alice Abbey was then called "Whistler's mother." She is survived by her husband of 53 years, Donald; her three daughters and two sons-in-law, Kay Smith, Lake Jackson, Texas, Marsha and Carey Johnson, Scottsdale, Ariz., and Beth and Jeri Jankowski, Beulah; two sons and daughters-in-law, Barry and Dee Dee, Beulah, and Kim and Vicki, Bismarck; 14 grandchildren, Josh and Sarah Smith, Lake Jackson, Briana, Ciara, Trevor and Amber Johnson, Scottsdale, Tyson and Haley Jankowski, Beulah, Michael, Cory and Erin Wetzel, Beulah, and Cole, Oran and Kara Wetzel, Bismarck; four sisters, June Dolce, Liberty Lake, Wash., Lois Land, Sidney, Mont., Marilyn Gustafson, Stanton, and Colleen Flemmer, Stevensville, Mont.; and three brothers, Gale Abbey, Glendive, Mont., Jim Abbey, Glendale, Ariz., and Alan Abbey, Beulah. She was preceded in death by her mother and father; and one sister, Donna Abbey Stasel. The family is so thankful to all of those who helped them during the last months of Lenore's illness. They would like to especially thank Inez Sommer, Marilyn Gustafson, the Sakakawea Hospice workers and Judy Erickson. In lieu of flowers, the family asks to please send memorials to Sakakawea Hospice at 510 Eighth Ave. N.E., Hazen, N.D. 58545.

"For you will go out with joy and be led forth with peace; The mountains and the hills will break forth into shouts of joy before you."


Lenore Wetzel, 72, of Beulah, died Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003, at Sakakawea Medical Center, Hazen, following a long illness. Services were Saturday, March 1, 2003, at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Beulah, with Fr. Charles Zins, officiating. Burial followed in the church cemetery. Lenore was born April 29,1930, in Beulah to Oran Ralph Abbey and Alice Francis Herman Abbey. She was the third oldest of nine children and spent her youth on a farm south of Beulah. On August 13,1949, she married Harry Donald Wetzel of Zap, in Beulah. She remained in Beulah all of her life. Most of Lenore's time was spent taking care of her household and raising her family. When she found the time, she used her God given talents to enrich her home and families' lives by sewing, knitting, painting, ceramics and stitched the most intricate cross stitch patterns. She enjoyed bowling, participating in a league for many years. Later in life when family time allowed, she began golfing and also joined the golf league. She was a good cook and spent many of her days feeding family and relatives. She is survived by Donald, her husband of 53 years; her three daughters and two sons-in-law, Kay Smith, Lake Jackson, Texas, Marsha and Carey Johnson, Scottsdale, Ariz., and Beth and Jeri Jankowski, Beulah; two sons and two daughters-in-law, Barry and Dee Dee, Beulah, and Kim and Vicki, Bismarck; her 14 grandchildren, Josh and Sarah Smith, Lake Jackson, Texas, Briana, Clara, Trevor and Amber Johnson Scottsdale, Ariz., Tyson and Haley Jankowski, Beulah, Michael, Cory and Erin Wetzel, Beulah and Cole, Oran and Kara Wetzel, Bismarck; four sisters, June Dolce, Liberty Lake, Wash., Lois Lang, Sidney, Mont., Marilyn Gustafson, Stanton, and Colleen Flemmer, Stevensville, Mont.; and three brothers, Gale Abbey, Glendive, Mont., Jim Abbey, Glendale, Ariz., and Alan Abbey, Beulah. Lenore was preceded in death by her mother and father, and one sister, Donna Abbey Stasel. Arrangements conducted by Seibel Funeral Homes, Beulah and Hazen.


   

The April, 1993, snowfall at the Wetzel residence, about a month after the death of Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel, December 3, 2003. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Advice from the neighborhood expert

Don Wetzel starts his garden plants each spring from hybrid seed and lets them grow under florescent lighting in his basement.

Sometimes the best gardening advice can come from a neighborhood expert like Don Wetzel of Beulah. He's one of those guys who enjoys gardening and is willing to share the growing tips learned from years of trial and error. Don is known for growing some of the best and largest tomatoes around and the rest of his garden is just as good. In fact, he's been growing vegetables and cultivating apple trees for years, starting early each spring. Don tills his garden twice each year. The first time is as soon as the snow is gone, before the ground dries up completely. He then refills the garden right before planting, adding a commercial fertilizer and lawn clippings. Each spring around the end of March or first week of April, Don starts his garden plants in the house from hybrid seed. Sometimes the seeds may be slow to start, so he may soak the seeds in water for a few days until they start to sprout. Next, he plants the seeds in soil from his outside garden, mixed with peat moss. Then the plants are placed in his basement workshop under florescent lighting, which hangs about one-inch over the plants so the plants will germinate. When a plant is large enough to go into the garden bed outside, Don .............................


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel wrote his personal memories to pass away the time He was staying at home with his wife, Lenore Shirley (Abbey) Wetzel, who had cancer.


       

Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and his apple tree, October 8, 2009. He grafted lunchbox crab, Chestnut crab, Harelson and Golden Delicious apples onto the tree. Donald was in Fargo at the annual county agents meeting and told the group about it. They didn't believe it. The Mercer County Agent came and saw it. The surprise for the County Agent was that Donald had also grafted a pear onto the tree. Don was an outdoorsman and an excellent gardener. The garden kept him going after the death of his wife, Lenore, in 2003. Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.


           

Kay Koslan comments: My dad started with a small bee screened box in our garden to pollinate his large 1/2 acre garden, probably as an experiment. It was around 1960. I decided to check them out one day. They started buzzing around my head and I left running. I once took them to school for show and tell. The bee bit this boy I liked. I was embarrassed but I found the bee sack, so he didn't feel the sting. Over the years it grew to hives on farmer's lands. They loved it and he would bring them honey every year. Dad used it to make extra money but also loved the outdoors. A couple of years it was my job to wash all the honey jars in hot soapy water and add his label, "Spring Creek Apiary" to the jars. They'd sell it at the local grocery store. My brothers, Barry and Kim, had to help with the honey extraction. It was quite a setup. His hot knife to slice off the top layer of bees wax and then an expensive honey extractor to centrifugally remove the honey. It was always in the hot part of the summer. Then my dad and brothers would move the honey into honey barrels for packaging. Dad readied all his bee frames each year and the flat wax with octagonal shapes begun to give the bees a place to start that was added to the frames. He subscribed to Bee Journal magazines to learn more. Once the word spread and it sold in places in South Dakota, where they also had crops of sweet clover. The honey was the best, according to Dad, because it was sweet clover honey and never mixed with other types of pollen. Only bees that propagated sweet clover. And then Dad collected the extra bee pollen that he placed in the freezer. He said it was good for arthritis. He'd take a spoonful every day. Sometimes people would bring their jars to dad at our house and they'd pay just for the honey. There were other years, someone would call and ask to get rid of the bees. So he'd pull out his honey bee hive smoker and go over to the location. This was the same way the hives were emptied of the bees so the honey boxes could be brought in to harvest the honey. He'd smoke the bees and they'd fill up on honey and move away. They did not sting then. Dad quit selling locally eventually and sold his honey to the large apiaries in South Dakota in barrels. The amount varied by year because of the bees, but the largest crop of honey he got was 63 barrels, each at 600 lb. Thus 37,800 lb (18.9 tons). He kept up the bees until after my mother died. He sold all of his equipment and barrels to an apiarist in 2004. It was sad to see it go but by that time, Dad was 76. The final day in 2004, my brother and Dad loaded up the boxes ready for the new owner.

Dad and my brothers and spent late summer every year until 2004 with honey bees - more than 40 years. I forget how many hives we had, but we had a lot. They were on ten different locations; one was on my Grandma Alice Abbey's land, which the Abbey children and family still own today.

Photos courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel and his friend, Chip Unruh, flew on the Roughrider Honor Flight to Washington, DC, from September 18 to 19, 2009. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Harry Donald "Don" Wetzel celebrated his 85th birthday on September 8, 2012. Photo courtesy of Kay Koslan.


Lowell Ellsworth Smith died February 5, 1986, in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH, at age 80. Buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH..


The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Hamilton Co., OH, Friday,  February 7, 1986

SMITH

Lowell E., loving husband of Marguerite A. Smith (nee Pfaff), dear father of Arthur W. Smith of Grand Rapids, MI., brother of Clarence Smith of CA., grandfather of Sarah and Joshua Smith. Wednesday, February 5, 1986. Age 80 years. Funeral from the Gump-Holt Funeral Home, 3440 Glenmore Avenue, Chevoit, Saturday, February 8 at 10:30 A.M. Friends may call from 9 A.M. until time of service. Member of Western Hills Lodge #762 F&AM and Scottish Rite.


Kay Donnette (Wetzel) (Smith) Koslan began her Dow Chemical Company career in 1990, and retired in 2016.


American Society of Chemical Engineers biography of Kay Donnette (Wetzel) (Smith) Koslan.

Ms. Kay Koslan

Kay's Chemical Engineering career began at the Dow Chemical Company in 1990 in process engineering/production spearheading a new soil devolatilization technology. She then focused in the Environmental group, namely in VOC/NOX Netting RCRA Subpart CC implementation and other RCRA regulations, as well as negotiations with EPA and the TECQ (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality). From environmental work she moved to process engineering in the designing/upgrading of facilities in Texas and Tarragona, Spain. The remainder of her Dow career was spent in the Process Safety group. The work included the EPA Risk Management Plan (RMP) dispersion modeling for all facilities and chemicals at Dow North America for the first EPA RMP submittal.  She also led the development/rewriting of a 17-chapter Dow relief device manual. Kay developed the Dow's first Portable Buildings Best Practice after the Texas City BP explosion and Process Safety Standards for Portable Buildings and Tents. Through the best practice she initiated the chemical industry involvement and participation in the writing of the the required OSHA API RP 753: Management of Hazards Associated with Location of Process Plant Portable Buildings, and the API RP 756: Management of Hazards Associated with Location of Process Plant Tents. She brought the design and best practice of blast-resistant high strength portable buildings at Dow. She was the Dow PHAST Subject Matter Expert globally for assisting others in developing dispersion models for designing plants through hazard analysis and LOPA.  This included implementing a global PHAST training program for Dow. She was also responsible for the implementation of the Dow Global Process Safety Training program in 17 languages, as well as leading an effort to ensure process engineers and process automation engineers were trained in process safety. Kay graduated from Montana State University in Bozeman with a Chemical Engineering degree. Kay retired from the Dow Chemical in 2016 to enjoy her family and hobbies of RV travels and genealogy.


 

Gwendolyn Alice Wetzel was born 05 Feb 1895 and died 05 Aug 1923 in Minneapolis. She went to Jamestown College in Jamestown, ND. 
She was married 03 Apr 1920 in Minneapolis to Carlton Lee Staley. (born 27 Sep 1896, in Belding, MI, and died 15 Nov 1968 in Portland, OR. Carlton then married (2) October 15, 1927, in Multnomah Co., OR, to Alice Myrna Schultz.

 
They had a daughter Mary Alice Staley born 16 Aug 1922 and died 24 Sep 1922.  

 
They adopted a son Carlton Staley, Jr., born 07 May 1921 in Minneapolis, MN, and died 10 Feb 2009 Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai, Idaho, USA