James Gilby Sr.


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James Gilby Sr. was born August 20, 1782, in Wilksby, County Lincolnshire, England; Baptized August 25, 1782, in Wilksby, County Lincolnshire, England; and died December 18, 1864, probably in Trafalgar Twp., Ontario, Canada, at age 82. He is the son of Robert Gilby of England and Mary Unknown of Unknown.

Mary Cooly was born about 1790 in England, and died before March 1851 in England. She is the daughter of Unknown.

James Gilby Sr. and Mary Cooly were married June 1, 1808, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England.

James Gilby Sr. and Mary (Cooly) Gilby had at ten children:

  1. Robert Gilby: Born about January 1810, in Kirton in Holland, Boston Borough, County Lincolnshire, England; Baptized January 7, 1810, in Kirton in Holland, Boston Borough, County Lincolnshire, England; Died 1881-1891 in County Yorkshire England. Married (1) about 1818 in England to Elizabeth Unknown: Born about 1806 in Brantingham, County Yorkshire, England; Died Unknown. Married (2) July-September 1869 in York, County Yorkshire, England, to Fannie (Unknown) Quin: Born about 1825 in Ireland; Died Unknown.
  2. John Gilby Sr.: Born January 8, 1812, in Kirton in Holland, Boston Borough, County Lincolnshire, England; Baptized January 19, 1812, in Kirton in Holland, County Lincolnshire, England; Died February 15, 1863, in Malahide Twp., Ontario, Canada (age 51). Married October 17, 1842, in York, Yorkshire, England, to Alisemon Elizabeth "Alise" Straw: Born April 15, 1816, in the City of Lincoln, County Lincolnshire, England; Died May 2, 1910, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND (age 94).
  3. Elizabeth Gilby: Born October 15, 1815, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England; Died Unknown.
  4. William Gilby: Born August 31, 1817, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England; Died Unknown. Married to Jennie Daniels: Born Unknown; Died Unknown. Children included Edna and Arthur.
  5. Jane Gilby: Baptized August 20, 1820, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England; Buried September 2, 1821, in Frampton churchyard (age 1).
  6. James Gilby Jr.: Born May 2, 1821, in Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England; Died September 7, 1907, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND (age 86). Married about 1890 in Grand Forks Co., ND, to Alisemon Elizabeth "Alise" (Straw) Gilby: Born Alisemon Elizabeth "Alise" Straw was born April 15, 1816, in the City of Lincoln, County Lincolnshire, England; Died May 2, 1910, in Gilby Twp., Grand Forks Co., ND (age 94).
  7. Charles Gilby: Born about October 8, 1824, in Lincoln, County Lincolnshire, England; Died about 1865 in Mahoning Co., OH (about age 41). Married about 1845 in England to Elizabeth Smith: Born about 1825 in Fudaythorp, County Yorkshire, England; Died 1860 in Trafalgar, Halton Co., Ontario, Canada (about age 35).
  8. Jane Gilby: Baptized January 1, 1825, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England; Buried September 7, 1826, in Frampton churchyard (age 1).
  9. Mary Gilby: Born July 9, 1826, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England; Died Unknown.
  10. Francis Gilby: Born November 5, 1828, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England; Died Unknown.



TIMELINE


The Elisamon Saga, provided by Andy Straw, as a PDF file.

Dear Leigh:

I recently found your website while looking for information about an ancestor of mine, Alisemon Gibly (nee Straw).

My relationship to Alisemon is that she was a first cousin of Thomas Straw (born 1828 in Lincoln, England) who was my Great Grandfather and emigrated to Australia in 1853, the same year as the Giblys emigrated to Canada.

Although I had previously found that Alisemon Straw married John Gibly in York, I had very little information as to what became of them after they arrived. I found your website very interesting and have used the information about Alisemon in developing my records of the Straw family.

My particular interest in Alisemon is because of her uncommon name which with different spellings has been used in many generations and the original Elisamon was a "fairy godmother" to my Great Grandfather. This is explained in a story I have written in the attached document (The Elisamon Saga). I have attached two different formats of the same story

My reason for writing to you is to let you know that I have a great deal of information about Alisemon's ancestors in England which I could send to you if you are interested. Also I would be very interested to know if in your family research you have come across any information which may help in me finding more about why the name Elisamon or Alsemon has been so popular in our history.

Regards,

Andy Straw

Sydney Australia


The Straws of Lincolnshire, provided by Andy Straw, as a PDF file.

The Descendants of George Straw, provided by Andy Straw, as a PDF file.

The Descendants of Walter Straw, provided by Andy Straw, as a PDF file.

Dear Leigh:

Thank you for your very prompt reply to my my previous email.

Yes, you can include whatever parts of my story you wish on your web site.

For your information I have attached some more information providing more details of Alisemon's English ancestors.

As all the names become confusing, in the attached story I have included the date of birth in brackets after the name to help in identifying who I am talking about.  I have also attached two descendant charts to help in keeping track of all the ancestors.

To help in understanding where Alisemon Gilby fits into the story the line of descendants from the first Straw is as follows

Walter Straw (c1650) - Jane

Walter Straw (1679) - Mary

Walter Straw (1712) - Elizabeth

George Straw (1754) - Mary Walker

John Straw (1792) - Hannah Martin

Alisemon Straw (1816) - John Gilby      (Emigrated to Canada 1853)

 

My line of ancestors is the same as far as George Straw (1754) then

Robert Straw (1786) - Sarah Martin  (Sarah and Hannah Martin were sisters marrying brothers Robert and John)

Thomas Straw (1828) - Emily Osborn     (Emigrated to Australia 1853)

Frederick Martin Straw (1858) - Harriet Stroud

Keith Blundell Straw (1894) - Constance Barbour

Andrew James Straw (1933) - June Hill

 

As well as my particular interest in Alisemon I am also interested in the Emily Straw who emigrated to Canada with the Gilbys.

You will note that in Chapter 3 of my story I record that an Emily Straw, then aged 14, was residing with Robert Straw (1786) at the time of the 1841 Census. I think she was the same Emily that emigrated with the Gilbys, but I can't work out which family she came from.

Do you have any further information about this Emily Straw.  Did she eventually marry?

Regards,

Andy Straw

Sydney Australia


 

 

 

 

 

 

James Gilby Sr. was born August 20, 1782, in Wilksby, County Lincolnshire, England.

Mary Cooly was born about 1790 in England.

James Gilby Sr. and Mary Cooly were married June 1, 1808, Frampton, County Lincolnshire, England.

The 1841 UK Census as of March 30, 1841, shows James Gilby (age 60) born in County Lincolnshire, England, is a Cottager and is living in Frampton Parish, County Lincolnshire, England. Living with him are: Mary Gilby (age 50) born in County Lincolnshire; and a male, France Gilby (age 12) born in County Lincolnshire. Leigh Larson note: A "Cottager" was a person, usually a man, who leased a small plot of land with a cottage on it. The land was usually worked like a family vegetable plot and may have had a pen for a pig or a couple of sheep. Some cottagers did well with their garden plots and became "Market Gardeners", selling extra produce on market days. Others may have progressed to being regular farmers. Most land was owned by large landowners and small plots or farms rarely came up for sale. Land tended to be passed on within the families.

Mary (Unknown) Gilby died before March 1851 in England.

The 1851 UK Census as of March 30, 1851, shows John Gilby (age 36) born in Kirton, County Lincolnshire, England, is a Grocer Master employing one man and living at 6 New Bridge Street, St. John Parish, City of York, Micklegate, County Yorkshire, England. Living with him is his wife Elizaman Gilby (age 34) born in the City of Lincoln. Also living there are their children, all born in York: Emily Gilby (age 6); James Gilby (age 5); Emma Gilby (age 3); and John Straw Gilby (age 1). John's widowed father also lives there: Jas. Gilby, Sen., (age 70) born in Wilksby, County Lincolnshire, England, a Retired Farmer. The assistant grocer and two house servants also live there.

The 1851 UK Census as of March 30, 1851, shows Robert Gilby (age 40) born in Kirton, County Lincolnshire, England, is a Gardener and living on Regent Street, St. Lawrence Parish, City of York, County Yorkshire, England. Living with him is his wife, Elizabeth Gilby (age 44) born in Brantingham, County Yorkshire, England. Also living there are his three daughters: Emma Gilby (age 12) born in Brantingham, County Yorkshire, England; Mary Gilby (age 10) born in Bradford, County Yorkshire, England; and Maria Gilby (age 4) born in Bradford, County Yorkshire, England.


Name

Arrival Date

Estimated birth year

Gender

Port of Departure

Destination

Ship Name

John Gilby, a Spinner

9 Nov 1853

abt 1813

Male

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

Mrs. Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1816

Female

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

Emily Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1844

Female

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

James Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1846

Male

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

Emma Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1848

Female

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

John Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1850

Male

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

George Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1853

Male

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

Emily Straw

9 Nov 1853

abt 1829

Female

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

James Gilby, a Weaver

9 Nov 1853

abt 1779

Male

Liverpool, England

Chicago

William Tapscott

             

Charles Gilby, a Weaver

9 Nov 1853

abt 1827

Male

Liverpool, England

Cincinnati

William Tapscott

Elizabeth Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1828

Female

Liverpool, England

Cincinnati

William Tapscott

William Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1846

Male

Liverpool, England

Cincinnati

William Tapscott

Robert Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1848

Male

Liverpool, England

Cincinnati

William Tapscott

Charles Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1850

Male

Liverpool, England

Cincinnati

William Tapscott

Mary Gilby

9 Nov 1853

abt 1852

Female

Liverpool, England

Cincinnati

William Tapscott

             

George Gilby

4 Nov 1853

abt 1829

Male

Liverpool, England

Cincinnati

Star of the West

   

The 1853 Immigration Passenger Lists for the Gilby families. Port of departure: Liverpool, England. Ship Name: William Tapscott. Port of arrival: November 9, 1853, in New York. Family Origin: England. Family Destination: ? An Emily Straw seems to have been traveling with the Gilbys.


The 1853 Immigration Passenger List for George Gilby (age 24). Port of departure: Liverpool, England. Ship Name: Star of the West. Port of arrival: November 4, 1853 in New York. Family Origin: England. Destination: United States.


In 1855 John Gilby was still listed as a Grocer at 6 New Bridge Street.

The 1861 UK Census as of March 30, 1861, shows Robert Gilby (age 50) born in Kirton, County Lincolnshire, England, is a Gardener and is living on New York Street, St. Mary Bishophill Parish, City of York, County Yorkshire, England. Living with him is his wife, Elizabeth Gilby (age 55) born in Brantingham, County Yorkshire, England. Also living there are his two daughters: Emma Gilby (age 22) born in Brantingham, County Yorkshire, England, a Household Servant; and Maria Gilby (age 14) born in Nidd, County Yorkshire, England. A boarder also lives in the household.

The 1861 Canadian Census shows John Gilby Sr. (age 48) born in England is a married Farmer and is living in a single story log home in Trafalgar Twp., Halton Co., Ontario, Canada. Living with him are the following, all unmarried, except for Alezamon: Alezamon Gilby (age 44); Emily Gilby (age 17) born in England; James Gilby (age 15) born in England, a Labourer; Emma Gilby (age 12); John Gilby Jr.(age 11) born in England, a Labourer; Geo. Gilby (age 9), born in England, a Labourer; James Gilby Sr. (age 83) born in England, a widowed Labourer; James Gilby Jr. (age 40) born in England, a Labourer; Chas. Gilby (age 11) born in England, a Labourer; Emily Straw (age not listed) born in Trafalgar; and Frank Gilby (age not listed) born in Trafalgar.

John Gilby died February 15, 1863, in Trafalgar Twp., Halton Co., Canada West, at age 51.

Emma Gilby (age 28) daughter of Robert Gilby, married May 25, 1868, in York, County Yorkshire, England, to Charles Pickard (born about 1843) the son of William Pickard.

James Gilby Sr. died December 18, 1864, in Ontario, Canada at age 98.


Gravestone in Oakville, Ontario, Canada


The 1871 UK Census as of March 30, 1871, shows Robert Gilby (age 58) born in Kirton in Holland, County Lincolnshire, England, is a Gardener and living in Cherry Hill, St. Mary Bishophill Senior Parish, Mickelgate, City of York, County Yorkshire, England. Living with him is his wife, Fannie Gilby (age 46) born in Ireland, County Yorkshire, England. Also living there are his two daughters: Jane Gilby (age 1) born in City of York, County Yorkshire, England; and Catherine Quin (age 16) born in Staffordshire, England, a Match Maker.

The 1881 UK Census as of March 30, 1881, shows Robert Gilby (age 70) born in Kirton, County Lincolnshire, England, is a Nursery Man and living at 2 White Hall, Drenden Parish, Halifax, County Yorkshire, England. Living with him is his wife, Fanny Gilby (age 56) born in Ireland, County Yorkshire, England. Also living there is his daughter: Jane Gilby (age 10) born in City of York, County Yorkshire, England.


ABNER ABBEY 

Among the pioneers of North Dakota the subject of this article deserves mention in any work purporting to be a history of the progress and development of the state, and especially of Grand Forks county. He became one of the first settlers of Gilby township, on section 24, in 1880. In 1889 he removed to section 27, where he has resided continuously since.

Mr. Abbey was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, August 9, 1849. His parents were Abner and Mary (Nugent) Abbey, the former being a Pennsylvanian by birth, and the latter a native of the north of Ireland. The father moved to Canada, where he spent the last years of his life. Five sons and two daughters were born of this union, of whom four sons and one daughter are now living, their various places of residence being Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska and North Dakota. Four sons served in Wisconsin and Minnesota regiments during the Civil war, one son dying at Mobile from sickness contracted from exposure.

Abner Abbey was reared and educated in Canada, and in 1870 removed to Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, and resided for two years in that state. He then visited Montana and spent some time in the southern states. Finally, in 1880 he came to Grand Forks county, North Dakota, and during the same year filed a pre-emption claim to a portion of section 24, Gilby township. He has made many and valuable improvements on section 27, and is now the owner of one and a half sections of the best and most valuable lands in the county. His buildings are of the most modern and convenient pattern, and his home is one of the most comfortable and commodious of farm properties in North Dakota.

Mr. Abbey was married, in 1884, in Grand Forks, to Miss Emma Gilby. Mrs. Abbey is a native of England, her parents, John and Alisemon (Strow) Gilby, having emigrated from that country to Canada in 1853. They had three sons and one daughter, Mrs. Abbey. Two of the sons, James and George, settled in Grand Forks county in 1879, in the township that has been named for them. Mr. and Mrs. Abbey have two children, Alisemon E. and Charles G., both of whom are living. A portrait of Mr. Abbey and his excellent wife is contained in these pages. In political faith Mr. Abbey is a Republican. He has been active in public affairs of a local nature and has filled various local offices. He assisted in the organization of the township of Gilby, and has been an influential citizen since the settlement of the county. He has been prosperous and successful, gaining his present valuable holdings by industry and good business judgment, as he came to North Dakota with nothing and began at the bottom.


ABNER ABBEY

Spouse: EMMA GILBY

Abner Abbey was born in the province of Ontario, Canada on August 9, 1849. His parents were Abner and Mary (Nugent) Abbey, the former being a Pennsylvanian by birth and the latter a native of the north of Ireland. The father moved to Canada where he spent the last years of his life. Five sons and two daughters were born of this union, and they resided in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska and North Dakota. Four sons served in Wisconsin and Minnesota regiments during the Civil War, one son dying at Mobile from an illness contracted from exposure.

Abner Abbey grew up and was educated in Canada. When he was twenty-one he moved to Fond du Lac county in Wisconsin and resided there for two years. He then visited Montana and spent some time in the southern states where he drove a stagecoach.

In 1873, Abner came to the territory of Dakota and began an exciting adventure when he joined the government service. For two years he drove a mule train, having one train of the four hundred and six mule trains plying between Fort Abercrombie, south of Fargo to Fort Lincoln near Bismarck. The main line of the Northern Pacific Railway was being surveyed. General George A. Custer was in command of the cavalry that protected the great supply train of prairie schooners and herds of cattle. Abner had a wealth of interesting stories to tell about those wild days. His recollections of General Custer and the many skirmishes with the Indians and the attacks of the buffalo on the cattle were many. One story that he told his grandson was of an incident when Abner's wagon had become disabled. The wagon train was forced to move on to a safer place before nightfall. Abner, left alone repaired the damage to his wagon by dusk, but just then a band of Indians arrived. The chief motioned for him to follow them. He had no choice but to obey. When they reached the Indian encampment the squaws were preparing the evening meal. Abner perceived they were making a stew from some animal. Upon closer observation he noted they hadn't removed the fur or feet and that it was dog stew. The chief motioned for him to help himself. Abner declined saying, "Thank you, but I'm not hungry." The chief became stern and again motioned him to eat. He looked around and saw the hostile faces of other Indians and not daring to offend them further he ate the stew. He had received a compliment from General Custer for his completion of a successful mission through difficult terrain in Indian territory. Of this he was proud. The following year he was with the party that surveyed the Canadian boundary.

In 1880 Abner came to Grand Forks County, North Dakota and that year filed a pre-emption claim four miles southeast of the present site of Gilby. Here the Gilby brothers, George, James and John homesteaded. In 1882 Miss Emma Gilby came to keep house for her brothers. Emma and her three brothers had emigrated from York, England with their parents, John and Alisemon (Strow) Gilby to Canada in 1853. Accompanying them were several uncles and aunts making a total of ten Gilbys who sailed for three weeks on a sailing vessel to the new land.

It was when Abner came to discuss a land sale with the Gilbys that he met their sister, Emma. A romance began and in 1884 Abner and Emma were married in Grand Forks. A daughter, Alisemon was their first born. In the fall two years later, a second child was expected. Abner had business in Grand Forks and he left by horse and buggy for the two day trip. Arrangements were made with the Lewis family who lived a short distance away, that if Emma needed help she could signal them by placing a lighted lamp in the east window. In the early morning hours of September 20th, sharp pains indicated an early birth. Emma attempted to get out of bed to light the lamp. Halfway to the window she stumbled and fell to the floor and her baby boy, Charles Gilby was born there. She was able to tend to her own needs and it was here Abner found her and their son upon his return from Grand Forks.

Abner made many and valuable improvements on his land. He was the first to plant trees in the area. His buildings were of the most modern and convenient structures and his home was described as being one of the most comfortable and commodious of farm properties in North Dakota.

In political faith, Abner was a Republican. He had been active in public affairs in the local community and had filled various local offices. He assisted in the organization of the township of Gilby, and had been an influential citizen during the settlement of the county. He became prosperous and successful, gaining his valuable holdings by industry and good business judgment, as he came to the Dakota's with few possessions.

Emma, his wife was a diminutive lady who was known for her gentleness and kindness to friends and neighbors. She adored her children and often made trips with them to visit relatives in Winnipeg and Toronto, Canada, staying several weeks at a time. On the farm there was always a crew of men to be boarded. A hired girl was employed most of the time. At times during the busy harvest season, Emma and her daughter would bake pies and bread and walk two miles west of the farmstead to prepare the rest of the meal in a small claim shanty.

Their children attended a rural school a half mile south of the farm. The Abbey family usually boarded the teacher and the school was known as the Abbey School. The building was heated by a wood stove which would not hold fire overnight. It wouldn't "take" cord wood, so each noon the bigger boys sawed enough wood to last until the next noon. The teacher was paid thirty dollars a month and the term was often divided into three month sessions, depending upon the weather and farm work. The small schoolroom had two rows of double desks, one on each side of the stove. Later, Charley attended Interstate Business College in Grand Forks.

Charley owned the first car in the community, a Buick. He was sometimes hired to taxi salesmen and businessmen who came by train to Gilby and needed transportation in the area.

Emma's father (John) passed away in Canada and her mother married her husband's brother (James). When they reached their senior years, Emma and Abner had them come to Dakota to live with them. They lived to be over ninety years of age and Emma cared for them until their death.

On June 1, 1908 Abner and Emma purchased a house in Gilby. They lived there and Abner commuted to the farm each day. Gradually the farming operation was taken over by Charley their son. Each was eighty years of age when they passed away, Emma in 1928 and Abner in 1929.


 

Name

Country

Date

Papers

County

 Abbey, Abner 

 Canada 

 March 28, 1888 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Abbey, Abner 

 Canada 

 January 28, 1892 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 

Name

Country

Date

Papers

County

 Gilby, Frank 

 Canada 

 April 19, 1880 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, Frank 

 Canada 

 November 01, 1890 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, George 

 England 

 June 10, 1879 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, George 

 England 

 June 14, 1884 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, James 

 England 

 June 10, 1879 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, James 

 England 

 March 01, 1890 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, John 

 England 

 April 24, 1880 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, John 

 England 

 August 07, 1885 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 

Name

Country

Date

Papers

County

 Abbey, Abner 

 Canada 

 March 28, 1888 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Abbey, Abner 

 Canada 

 January 28, 1892 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 

Name

Country

Date

Papers

County

 Gilby, Frank 

 Canada 

 April 19, 1880 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, Frank 

 Canada 

 November 01, 1890 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 

Name

Country

Date

Papers

County

 Gilby, George 

 England 

 June 10, 1879 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, George 

 England 

 June 14, 1884 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, James 

 England 

 June 10, 1879 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, James 

 England 

 March 01, 1890 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, John 

 England 

 April 24, 1880 

 1st 

 Grand Forks 

 Gilby, John 

 England 

 August 07, 1885 

 2nd 

 Grand Forks