Henry Thaddeus Larson


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Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson was born August 6, 1896, in Woodland Twp., Yolo Co., CA, and died April 6, 1950, at the Napa State Hospital, near Imola, Napa Co., CA, at age 53. Buried in Plot Block 20, Lot 3, Grave 5, in Woodland Cemetery, Woodland, Yolo Co., CA. He is the son of Erik Larsson of Frobbestorp, Kalmar Lan, Småland, Sweden, and Mary Sophia Nelson of Finland.

Ruby Frances Handley was born August 22, 1917, in Elk Co., KS, and died May 15, 1992, in Longview, Cowlitz Co., WA, at age 74. Buried in Longview Memorial Park & Mausoleum, Longview, Cowlitz Co., WA. She is the daughter of Samuel Franklin Handley of Crown Point. Lake Co., IN, and Mary Frances McKee of Cambridge, Story Co., IA.

When Frances was about 13 years old she met Henry, who was working for her father, Samuel Franklin Handley.

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson and Ruby Frances Handley were married June 12, 1932, in Merced Co., CA, when she was 14 years old.

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson and Ruby Frances (Handley) Larson had two children:

  1. Robert Franklin Larson: Born November 10,  1933, in Merced Co., CA. Changed name to Meyer about 1939; changed back to Larson about 1990. Married August 13, 1955, in Kern Co., CA, to Annice Marie Kidd: Born March 24, 1933, in Kern Co., CA. Divorced January 1968 in Kern Co., CA.
  2. LeRoy Stanley Larson: Born April 22, 1935, in Merced Co., CA. Married (1) December 16, 1956, in Santa Clara Co., CA, to Katherine Louise Berrett: Born Unknown. Divorced July 1959. Married (2) October 9, 1959, in Unknown to Virginia Lee Downs: Born about 1937 in Indiana. Leory Meyer.

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson deserted his family about 1935 in California.

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson and Ruby Frances (Handley) Larson were divorced about 1936 - 1937.

Ruby Frances (Handley) Larson then married Leroy Donald Meyer.

Leroy Donald Meyer was born October 8, 1909, in Cache Twp., Comanche Co., OK, and died October 29, 1993, in Belleview, Cowlitz Co., WA, at age 84. He is the son of Joe J. Meyer of Alabama and Lizzie (Unknown) of Illinois.

Leroy Donald Meyer and Ruby Frances (Handley) Larson were married April 17, 1939, in Merced, CA.

Leroy Donald Meyer and Ruby Frances (Handley) (Larson) Meyer had one child.

  1. Eileen Ladonna Meyer: Born February 24, 1945, in Bakersfield, Kern Co., CA. Married about 1969 to Ronald Wayne "Ron" Jones: Born May 8, 1946, in Unknown. Kelso, WA.

Leroy Donald Meyer never legally adopted the two Larson brothers, but about 1939 legally changed their last name from Larson to Meyer.




TIMELINE


Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson is buried in Plot Block 20, Lot 3, Grave 5, in Woodland Cemetery, Woodland, Yolo Co., CA. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making this image available.


Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson was born August 6, 1896, in Woodland Twp., Yolo Co., CA.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 6, 1900 shows Erick Larson (age 46) born November 1853 in Sweden to Swedish-born parents and having emigrated from Sweden in 1873 and a Naturalized citizen is a Day Laborer living in Woodland Twp., Yolo Co., CA. Living with him is his wife of twelve years, Mary S. Larson (age 45) born August 1867 in Finland to Finnish-born parents and having emigrated from Finland in 1886, with all five of the children born to her still alive. Also living there are his five sons, all born in California to Swedish and Finnish-born parents: Clarence O. Larson (age 11) born July 1888; Nels A. Larson (age 10) born April 1890; Myron E. Larson (age 8) born October 1891; Carl E. Larson (age 5) born June 1894; and Henry T. Larson (age 3) born August 1896.

Leroy Donald Meyer was born October 8, 1909, in Cache Twp., Comanche Co., OK.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken May 6, 1910 shows Harvey D. Stewart (age 45) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents and married once is a Farmer owning his own farm free of a mortgage and living in Woodland Twp., Yolo Co., CA. Living with him is his wife of one year, Mary S. Stewart (age 42) born in Sweden to Swedish-born parents and married twice, with all 3 of the children born to her still alive. Also living there are his two unmarried stepsons, both born in California to Swedish-born parents: Clarence Stewart (age 21) a House Carpenter; and Henry Stewart (age 14). Also lining there is Clarence's unmarried sister, Clara Stewart (age 50) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents, who is not working. Leigh Larson note: It shows that Mary had three children, and all were living (she really by then had five, of which three were living). Some of the Mary S. data is obviously incorrect, suggesting that someone other than Mary provided the census information, since she was from Finland, not Sweden.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 19, 1910 shows S. F. Handley (age 36) born in Indiana to Ohio-born parents is a Laborer at the City Water Works who rents his home for $8/month and lives at 228 Circle Street, 6th Ward; City of Topeka, Shawnee Co., KS. Living with him is his wife of 8 years, Frances Handley (age 27) born in Iowa to Iowa and Wisconsin-born parents, with all 3 children born to her still living and born in Kansas: Bessie Handley (age 6); Leota Handley (age 5); and Hellen Handley (age 3). Also living there is his brother and family: H. C. Handley (age 33) born in Indiana to Ohio-born parents is a Laborer at the City Water Works. Also his wife of 8 years, Nettie Handley (age 34) born in Iowa to Iowa and Wisconsin-born parents, with 4 of the 5 children born to her still alive: Gilbert Handley (age 6) born in Kansas; Clair Handley (age 2) born in Oklahoma; Claton Handley (age 7/12) born in Oklahoma; and Clifford Handley (age 7/12) born in Oklahoma.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 20, 1910 shows J. J. Meyer (age 33) born in Alabama to French-born parents is a Farmer renting his farm and living in Cache Twp., Comanche Co., OK. Living with him is his wife of 9 years, Lizzie Meyer (age 32) born in Illinois to Swiss-born parents, with 4 of the 5 children born to her still alive. Also living there are his four children, all born in Oklahoma to Alabama and Illinois-born parents: Cletus Meyer (age 6); Carl Meyer (age 5); Jenette Meyer (age 2); and Lee Roy Meyer (age 7/12).


WOODLAND DAILY DEMOCRAT, Woodland, CA, August 28, 1911

BABY STEWART'S FUNERAL

The funeral of baby Hazel Stewart was held Sunday at 2 p. m. from the family residence on Cemetery avenue. Rev. C. M. Streeter conducted the services and was assisted by a choir consisting of Miss Mabel Griffes and Mrs. Carl Nichols. There was a large attendance, both at the home and at the cemetery, where the grave was marked with numerous beautiful floral offerings. The pallbearers were Kennedy Stewart, Ferdinand Stewart, Phillip Stewart and Henry Larson.


Ruby Frances Handley was born August 22, 1917, in Topeka, KS.


On June 5, 1918 the WWI Draft Registration Report shows Henry calls himself Henry Tandy Larson (age 21) and his local draft board is in Sutter Co., CA. His residence is RFD 1, Box 155A, Woodland, CA. He was born August 6, 1896 in Woodland, CA. His father was born in Sweden. His nearest relative is his mother, Mrs. H. B. Stewart, who lives in Woodland, CA. He is of medium height, medium build, blue eyes and light brown hair. His employer is W. H. Eager of Honcut, Butte Co., CA (north of Yuba City).


The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 26, 1920 shows Harvey D. Stewart (age 57) born in Pennsylvania to Pennsylvania-born parents is a Farmer owning his own farm free of a mortgage and living in Woodland Twp., Yolo Co., CA. Living with him is his wife, Mary S. Stewart (age 52) born in Finland to Finnish-born parents and having emigrated from Finland in 1886 and naturalized in 1909. Also living there is his son, Clark Stewart (age 7) born in California to Pennsylvania and Finnish-born parents. Also living there are his two unmarried stepsons, both born in California to Swedish and Finnish-born parents: Carl Larson (age 25) a Farm Laborer; and Henry Larson (age 23) a Farm Laborer.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 10, 1920 shows Frank Handley (age 46) born in Indiana to U. S. and Ohio-born parents is a Laborer renting his home on Noble Avenue, Precinct 2, Hinton, Waconda Twp., Caddo Co., OK. Living with him is his wife Francis Handley (age 37) born in Iowa to Iowa and Wisconsin-born parents. Their five unmarried daughters are also living there, all born in Kansas to Indiana and Iowa-born parents: Lizzie Handley (age 16); Leota Handley (age 14); Helen Handley (age 13); Reda Handley (age 8); and Francis Handley (age 2-6/12).

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on April 17, 1920 shows J. J. Meyer (age 42) born in Alabama to French-born parents is a General Farm Farmer renting his farm and living in Cache Twp., Cotton Co., OK. Living with him is his wife, Elizabeth Meyer (age 42) born in Illinois to Swiss-born parents. Also living there are his six children, all born in Oklahoma to Alabama and Illinois-born parents: Cletus Meyer (age 15); Carl Meyer (age 14); Jennett Meyer (age 12); Leroy Meyer (age 10); Beatrice Meyer (age 6); and Alvin Meyer (age 1-7/12). The Monroe R. Nichols family lives on the next farm.


Henry T. Larson's 1923 Mug Picture, from the San Quentin, CA, prison file. San Quentin State Prison is located in unincorporated San Quentin, Marin Co., CA.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Tuesday Evening, August 20, 1921

Larson Turned Hermit After Theft Is Claim

Further details of the arrest of Henry Larson of this city by Constable Isaac Clover yesterday upon a charge of auto theft in Sacramento some time ago are given in a press dispatch from Sacramento, where the alleged crime was committed, as follows:

In company with John Davis, Larson has been living in seclusion for some time, he told Sacramento officers, following his disappearance nearly a year ago after he had stolen an automobile and abandoned it near Applegate. Larson stole the machine from Alameda Marciell, a resident of the Stockton road, and in company of another youth, whose whereabouts is unknown to the local officials, started toward Auburn. Near Applegate, something went wrong with the motor and the boys were obliged to stop. Larson walked into Applegate and sought to have a garage man repair the machine, but was recognized through information of the theft telephoned to Applegate by Marciel, and was forced to flee. Since then he has been a fugitive from justice. The prisoner was brought to Sacramento by R. Hillhouse, a former deputy sheriff of Yolo county. Davis, whom the Yolo county sheriff is holding, was not implicated in the automobile theft.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Monday Evening, August 29, 1921

Yolo Man Held for Auto Theft

Traced to their hiding place on the Merritt ranch worked by Earnest Bourn, Constable Isaac Clover took into custody this morning E. Larson, a Yolo county boy, charged under a complaint out of the justice court  of Sacramento county with grand larceny in the alleged theft  of a Ford truck belonging to a Sacramento firm the name of which was not known to Clover. Young Larson was dispatched to Sacramento immediately by Clover in charge of Roy Hillhouse, former deputy sheriff here. Clover charges that young Larson is also wanted for the theft of certain articles from the Al Hedding ranch, but Hedding refuses to make complaint against the unfortunate young man. With Larson was another man, whose name is unknown to the  local officer, and is said to be wanted for army deserting. It is alleged by the officer that the two men had been hiding at the Bourn place for some three weeks, coming to Woodland under cover of night, but remaining in their sequestered tent by day. None of the details of the theft is known here, the entire matter developing in Sacramento city. The truck was recovered, and a number of bottles of plum juice found fermenting on the camp site, were taken. Clover is busy this afternoon searching the premises of Larson and his companion in the hope to throw some light on a number of petty burglaries.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Wednesday Evening, April 18, 1923

H. LARSON, PROBATIONER, YOLO FARMHAND, ACCUSED ASSAULTING GRAMMAR GIRL 

Henry Larson, choreman on the C. D. Huff ranch west of Yolo, is wanted under suspicion by Sheriff J. W. Monroe of being the man who late yesterday afternoon assaulted and struck over the head with a hammer an eleven-year-old Woodland grammar school girl, whom he lured in an automobile from the city while she was on her way home to her parents in the northern outskirts of Woodland. The girl was not seriously injured or assaulted. Sheriff J. W. Monroe, called out about midnight last night on the case by the parents of the girl, spent all of the night hunting for Larson, remaining from 3:30 o’clock until 7 this morning in the cabin on the Huff place where Larson makes his home. The automobile Larson used in his exploits with the school girl was standing alongside of the Huff barn, but the accused had not returned. Constable Leroy Hillhouse worked on the case earlier in the evening and remained with Monroe in the all-night vigil.

Identifies Pictures.

Pictures brought here this afternoon by Sheriff Monroe from the rogue’s gallery at Sacramento, were shown to the little girl and partly identified. “Yes, that looks like him,” said the child to the officer. As the photographs were taken four years ago and Larson was wearing different clothing and also wore a light mustache, positive identification by the victim of yesterday’s assault was not anticipated.

Limp Incriminating.

Another circumstance today tended to strengthen Sheriff Monroe’s suspicions. The child stated that the man limped. Larson has such a weakness. He told the little girl last night that a cow had stepped on his foot. Notwithstanding her trying ordeal the child was able to attend school today. The swelling on the back of her head where she had been hit with a hammer was reduced, the eye discoloring had disappeared and a bruised lip was the only outward mark left to show the results of the ill treatment accorded her. According to the story of Sheriff J. W. Monroe, obtained from the girl and scribed by her, Larson was traveling north along Walnut street after school hours. He drove his Ford car to the side of the road and invited the girl to jump in and ride with him, stating that he would take her home. The girl demurred, according to Sheriff Monroe. “Oh, you needn't be frightened. I know your parents,” Larson is credited with saying. The girl jumped in the car, which failed to stop at her home, or in its vicinity, except at a place en route to obtain some gasoline. Here, the story goes, the girl was cautioned to keep out of sight and be still. The assault, which was not of the most serious nature, is alleged by the girl to have begun in the car and to have continued until the two reached the Huff place, where he was employed as a stockman, caring for stock and generally caring for the ranch property during the absence of the Huffs, who are now in Los Angeles looking after business affairs. At the Huff ranch at Yolo, according to the story given Monroe and Hillhouse, Larson is alleged to have taken the girl into a large barn which she graphically described to the officers, and there he tried to have her smell from a bottle, the contents of which she did not know.

Stunned by Hammer.

Here the young complainant began to battle fiercely, warding off the fumes from the phial, until Larson became infuriated and to defeat any outcry, struck her, so she claims, over the head with a hammer. There was an abrasion and lump on the back of her head, giving credence to the story. She described to the officers where Larson threw the hammer, and upon investigation it was found that her story tallied in every minute detail with conditions as they were found at the barn where the main assault was attempted. The hammer was found about where she stated it was placed by the fugitive. It was apparent that the girl had been somewhat dazed or frightened by her gruesome experience and there were details which she could not altogether relate at her first interview with the officers, but generally the story dovetailed together. She stated that Larson directed her to remain in a hay pile until he finished doing his chores about the place. He threatened that he would kill himself should she tell or make outcry. She claimed to be very timid from her experience, but knew that after Larson did much work he returned to her after dusk, took her to the automobile under cover of darkness and drove her to within half a block of her home in this city. There the parents of the girl, beside themselves with fear over her safety, began to quiz her closely and little by little evolved the story which late in the night reached the ears of Sheriff Monroe.

Ranch Search Unavailing.

First of all Monroe and Hillhouse went to the Huff place in the thought that Larson might have returned. He could not be found, but the automobile in which he returned the girl to Woodland was parked near the barn wherein the assault had taken place. This indicated that Larson had returned to the ranch place. Search of the district was made for him, but he could not be found. Monroe and Hillhouse remained in his room during the early hours of the morning believing that he might return to do his chores and again leave. His cot indicated that he had not occupied it, but left after returning the automobile at the ranch. Larson is said to be on probation out of the superior court of Sacramento, after pleading guilty to the crime of stealing an automobile some four years ago. He was apprehended by Roy Hillhouse, when he was a deputy sheriff under Monroe. He is a man about 27 years of age and has some excellent connections in Yolo county. Those who know Larson claimed that he was not really strong mentally, and was regarded as somewhat "light minded." Sheriff Monroe has secured his photograph from the identification bureau at Sacramento and plans to post the two valleys in the hope to locate the man, whom he suspects of having assualted the small girl whose name is not made public out of respect to her parents and herself.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Thursday Evening, April 19, 1923

SHERIFF CAUTIONS AGAINST VIOLENCE IN ASSAULT CASE

Because of rash threats made by some members of a citizens' posse seeking to capture Henry Larson, Yolo ranch choreman who has disappeared since an alleged attack was made upon on an eleven-year-old schoolgirl of Woodland, Sheriff J. W. Monroe today deemed it advisable to issue a warning against mistreatment of Larson should he be found. "While there is strong circum­stantial evidence against Larson, we are by no means certain of the details told by the little girl and I am warning all of the posse who are interested in the case that Larson is to be dealt with the same as any other prisoner and is to have the full protection of the authorities sworn by law to handle his case," said Sheriff Monroe today.

Larson Seen, Report.

The sheriff stated that he had been told last night that Fred Storz saw Larson on a pile of wood, in the bed of Cache creek, not far from Yolo and where the posse and officers spent yesterday and last night. Monroe was on the job again today, assisted by a band of volunteer searchers. He be­lieves that Larson has a hiding place along the creek bank and may yet be found there.

Description Given.

Larson was described today as being 5 feet 8 inches tall, weighing 139 pounds, light complexioned with blue eyes and light hair, with the tip of his nose slightly lifted, his eyebrows meeting, and walking with a limp because of a trouble in his right hip. He is 27 years old. Records at Sacramento showed that he was arrested August 29, 1921, for the theft of a car. He was granted two years probation November 9, 1921. His probationary term would not have expired until this coming November.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Friday Evening, April 20, 1923

HUFF HOME; SAYS LARSON AN ECCENTRIC

Don Huff, whose ranch choreman, Henry Larson, is being sought upon suspicion of being responsible for an attack upon an eleven-year-old girl, returned home last night from a pleasure trip to Hollywood. Huff reported that Larson had access to the home on the ranch one mile west of Yolo, and it is Huff's theory that Larsen was in  the house when the officers arrived on the night of the alleged attempted assault. An alarm clock in Larson's room was found running the next day. Huff said this morning that this clock is barely an eight-hour contrivance and would have been still had it not been wound up the night before. Huff declared that Larson had worked on the ranch for three months. The employed described Larson as being "eccentric" and possibly weak minded. The officers had not given up the man hunt today, still believing that Larson will be starved out of his hiding place.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Friday Evening, April 20, 1923

Larson Cornered, Believes Sheriff; Dog Leads to Hiding Place in House

Barking of her dog attracted the attention Mrs. Birdie Marston to a man crouched down and hiding behind the piano at her home, north of Yolo, this morning. The man is believed to have been Henry Larson, wanted here on the suspicion of attempting to assault a school girl three nights ago. The stranger wore a cap similar to that of Larson. He pulled the cap down over his face, preventing Mrs. Marston from getting a complete look at him. Mrs. Marston ran to the home of her neighbor, Charles Fenton. The latter hurried to the Marston home, but in the meanwhile the strange visitor had disappeared. Fenton notified the sheriff’s office. Monroe and a posse of men went to Yolo immediately. They picked up a trail early this afternoon and believed that they would effect a capture by nightfall. An investigation of the house disclosed that the man had eaten the cupboard bare. Mrs. Marston had been away for the evening and the discovery of the stranger was made immediately upon her return about 11 o'clock this morning. The new development spurred on the authorities and their volunteer assistants to renew their efforts in the man hunt.

Circulars bearing the above photographs of Henry Larson, sought by Sheriff J. W. Monroe, who has a felony warrant charging him with an attempt to assault a school girl, will be in the hands of every police officer in California. The pictures were taken three years ago before Larson was granted probation, after admitting to the theft of an automobile. Larson’s appearance since then has changed but little. It was the belief of Sheriff Monroe today that the capture of Larson may come most any time. Confidence was expressed that he would be found before darkness sets in.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Saturday Evening, April 21, 1923

Farmhand Who Abused Girl Confesses; Made Break in Huff’s Car

Henry Larson, accused of luring an eleven-year-old grammar school girl residing in the Beamer addition to Woodland, to a lonely barn on the Don Huff ranch west of Yolo, was captured at 3:30 o’clock this morning, at the approach to the Southern Pacific bridge over the Sacramento river, by officers of the Sacramento police department. Larson stole the Huff car, hoping therein to make his escape. He confessed his guilt, but stated that he did not injure the little girl, according to the police. Larson will be returned to the county jail here to stand trial upon the felony charge against him. It may be, however, that before the current charge is urged against him, that he will be required to finish out a sentence from which he was paroled out of Sacramento for the alleged stealing of an automobile in 1920. That Larson had been hiding out in the vicinity of Casch creek and near the Huff ranch, and that he was driven to desperation through hunger and privation, is evident from the fact that the fugitive arrived at the Huff place about 2:30 o’clock this morning, with a well mapped out plan to steal the automobile and make his escape.

Steal Ford Car.

Mr. and Mrs. Huff were asleep in their home on the ranch. Huff heard a noise as of the vibration of the engine of the automobile. He looked out of the window and saw the lights of his car lit. Immediately Huff notified Constable Roy Hillhouse at his home in this city, and in short order police officers, north and south, covering Vallejo, Sacramento, Marysville and other valley points were urged to be on the lookout for Larson. Seeking to avoid the regularly traveled roads, Larson took a detour, hoping to make Sacramento via the Knights Landing highway. It was here the first sight of him was obtained and the general alarm given that he was making his escape. Last night a number of Woodlanders were guests at the Fred Snavely place, enjoying a mah jongg party and house-warming. About 2 o’clock the party at Snavely’s which included among others Dr. F. I. Reese, and George Kirk and W. S. Webster, broke up and all sought their cars to return to Woodland.

Guests Sight Larson.

George A. Kirk discovered that he was unable to turn on the battery in his car, having taken the wrong transmission key. Dr. and Mrs. Reese brought Mr. and Mrs. Kirk to Woodland, that Kirk might obtain the key to his auto. It was while on the trip to Woodland with the Kirks that Reese noticed the stolen Huff car parked on the highway opposite the Sam Grigsby ranch.

Larson Takes to Brush.

It was apparent that Larson became frightened at the light of approaching machines, parked his car and took to the brush and tall grain in the vicinity of the car. When Kirk and Reese came back on their return from the Snavely place to Woodland, the Huff car was gone, indicating that Larson returned to it after the cars had passed, and started on his wild and last ride back to Sacramento, where he hoped to gain liberty. When in Woodland, after recognizing the Huff car, Dr. Reese gave the alarm, notifying Hillhouse a second time of his adventure and the prospects of capturing Larson.

Five Make Arrest.

It was then that all main highways out of Yolo county were guarded, the capture finally taking place about 3:30 on the Southern Pacific bridge over the Sacramento river into the capital city. Patrolmen Cameron, Gorman, Redding, Pearl and Warren took Larson into custody. To the arresting officers Larson surrendered and confessed that he was the man wanted. He claimed in mitigation, however, that he did not seriously harm the little girl in question. The Huff car was taken into possession by the officers and will be returned to the owner. The offense of which Larson is charged took place last Tuesday afternoon. Larson had been left in charge of the C. D. Huff ranch, west of Yolo, during the absence of the Huffs, who were visiting and resting in Southern California.

Child’s Story.

Larson came to Woodland in the Huff car and in passing along Walnut street he noticed a young Woodland girl traveling toward her home. He invited her into his car, so she told the officers. He said he would take her home. The girl said she demurred, whereupon Larson is alleged to have stated that she need not be alarmed and that he knew her parents. Once in the car Larson proceeded  to Yolo, stopping, according to the girl, only to obtain gasoline. When he stopped, according to the girl, he told her to get into the bottom of the car and make no noise, hiding her under a strip of canvas. At Yolo he is accused of taking her into a barn on the Huff place. Here, so the girl stated to Sheriff J. W. Monroe, Larson attempted to have her smell from a small bottle he held under her nostrils. This she claims, frightened her and she fought. She told the officers that Larson thereupon struck her over the head with a hammer. Her head showed sign of an abrasion. Her description of the ranch tallied with subsequent investigations made by the authorities.

Threatens To Kill.

Larson is then alleged to have thrown the girl on a stack of hay and told her to remain there, threatening to kill himself if she made outcry or otherwise attracted attention. The girl followed instructions, remaining in the hay until Larson had completed the chores about the Huff ranch. Late in the evening he told her to jump into the Huff car, which she did, and Larson drove her to Woodland, within a half a block of her home in the Beamer addition. Late that night the story of the girl reached the sheriff’s office and the man hunt began, Larson going into hiding immediately he left the girl.

Ends Exciting Man Hunt.

Sheriff J. W. Monroe, Constable Roy Hillhouse and an army of men spent much time at the Huff place expecting the fugitive to return. Last night was the first known appearance at the ranch since the commission of the offense with which he is to be charged. Early yesterday Larson was frightened away from behind a piano in the Birdie Marston home, north of Yolo. Mrs. Marston had been away and when she returned her dog attracted her to Larson’s hiding place.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA, Saturday Evening, April 21, 1923

Larson Admits Using Chloroform To Dope Victim

Henry Larson, held in the Sacramento county jail, admitted to a “Democrat” reporter this afternoon that he lured the girl to the Huff place near Yolo, but denies either hitting her with a hammer or greatly mistreating her. He admits her story of holding a bottle under her nose, and states that it contained chloroform, but not enough to injure any person or render them senseless. He stated that he struck the girl with his knuckles, instead of a hammer, and that his knuckle is still sore from the blow that caused an abrasion on the back of her head. Larson states that he slept in the Huff house the night of the escapade with the girl, leaving around 3 o’clock in the morning while the officers were lying in wait for him.

Monroe to Return Larson.

Sheriff J. W. Monroe left for Sacramento on the 1:20 train today to return Larson to the county jail here for safe keeping pending his trial.


Oakland Tribune, Oakland, CA, Tuesday, April 24, 1923

Man Faces Charge Of Child Stealing

WOODLAND, April 24. - A charge of child stealing is to be placed against Henry Larson, Yolo county farm hand, arrested Saturday on a charge of luring from home and abusing an 11-year-old Woodland grammar school girl. Larson was captured in a car he had stolen from his employer, Doon Huff, a rancher living five miles from Woodland. District Attorney George T. Kern obtained a confession from Larson and a statement from the girl in which she agreed that Larson did nothing more than lure her from her home in Woodland to the Huff ranch. The girl frightened Huff away when he tried to chloroform her by holding phial to her nostrils. The kidnapping charge will be sworn out tomorrow before Justice of the Peace R. W. Harrison.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA, Monday Evening, April 23, 1923

LARSON WILL BE CHARGED WITH KIDNAPPING, PLAN TO SHIELD SCHOOL GIRL

Kidnapping may be the charge filed against Henry Larson, the choreman from the Huff ranch, near Yolo, who was brought to the Yolo county jail from Sacramento early Saturday evening. District Attorney Geo. T. Kern stated this morning that while no complaint had yet been filed against the man, he believed the charge would be that of child stealing. "There is a maximum penalty of twenty years provided for such offense and it appears that such complaint can be proved." said Kern. "In fact, I am told that Larson has already implicated himself by his own confession to the extent that he carried the little girl away in his automobile." By filing a charge of kidnapping, it will not be necessary to go into the accusations of an assault. Larson's story confirms that told by the 11-year-old girl in nearly every detail. In the presence of Sheriff J. W. Monroe of Yolo county, Captain of Detectives Arthur Ryan of Sacramento, Don Huff, his former employer, and a "Democrat" reporter, Larson told his story, following the recital of which  he was removed from the Sacramento jail and brought here to remain in custody at the Yolo county jail. Larson insisted that he did not mistreat the girl, but he subsequently admitted trying to render her unconscious by placing a bottle of chloroform to her nose and he also confessed to slugging her over the head with his bare knuckles. "My hand is sore yet," he added, at the same time denying the little girl's story that Larson had hit her over the head with a hammer, causing the swelling which was noticeable on the night of her horrifying experience. The prisoner admitted the truth of the child's statement that he had picked her up in Huff's automobile while she was on her way home from school, telling her that he knew her family and would give her a ride home. Larson also confessed that after getting to the outskirts of town, he shoved the child to the floor of the car and covered her up with a strip of canvas so that she would be  hidden from view. The girl's assailant denied having threatened her life or his own while at the ranch. He admitted the attempt to assault but protested that he did not carry out his intentions. Regarding his whereabouts after the attack, Larson said that after bringing the girl to within a short distance of her home he went back to the Huff ranch and went to sleep, choosing a bed inside the residence instead of at the bunk house. He was in the house, he said, when the officers came late that night. He left about 2:30 o'clock. Larson stated that had he recognized Sheriff J. W. Monroe as being one of the officers, he would have surrendered that night. According to his story, at no time did he get away ___ ____

Larson had tuned up the Huff automobile for a speedy escape. He had cleaned it up and oiled it and had it running to perfection, enabling him to make the trip to Sacramento Sunday morning in record time. One carload of Sacramento police was outdistanced by Larson, but the other machine was too fast. Seeing that he was cornered, Larson sped out of Washington, Yolo county, on the new highway leading to Elkhorn but his captors caught up with him and Larson surrendered without further difficulty. Huff drove home Saturday night in his stolen car. He found  his own 22-rifle and Larson's blankets and clothes in the machine. Huff had wrapped up Larson's belongings the day before and Larson found them upon his return to the ranch.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Wednesday Evening, April 25, 1923

Larson Formally Charged With Child Stealing; One To 20 Years is Penalty

Formal charges were made this morning against Henry Larson, choreman on the Don Huff ranch at Yolo, wherein he was accused of a series of offenses which amount to child stealing, alleged to have been directed against a twelve-year-old grammar school girl of Woodland, whom Larson lured into an automobile to a barn on the Huff ranch. The complaint was sworn to by the father of the girl involved. The punishment upon conviction for such an offense is from one to twenty years in state prison. The complaint was filed by District Attorney George T. Kern, with Justice of the Peace R. W. Harrison, who placed the warrant of arrest in the hands of Sheriff J. W. Monroe. Just as soon as Court Reporter W. E. Combrink is available Larson will be arraigned and have his preliminary hearing. The nature of the case is such that Justice Harrison plans to take the testimony behind closed doors. Larson, who was a fugitive for five days after the commission of the alleged offense, will not be admitted to bail, according to Harrison, because of the seriousness of the offense. It is understood that he will waive trial in the superior court and plead guilty. Larson is a second-time loser, having been sentenced to prison in Sacramento county for stealing an automobile. He was admitted to probation and was under probation when he committed his latest offense.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Thursday Evening, April 26, 1923

Larson Held To Answer Before Superior Court

Henry Larson, former choreman on the Don Huff ranch at Yolo, was held to answer before the superior court yesterday by Justice of the Peace R. W. Harrison to answer a charge of child stealing, committed in luring a Woodland grammar school girl from Woodland to an old barn in Yolo. The preliminary examination took place yesterday afternoon. District Attorney George T. Kern stated today that Larson would be taken before the superior court as soon as an information is filed against him. The accused has expressed a desire to have the matter over with at as early a date as possible. The little girl was the chief witness against Larson.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Monday Evening, April 30, 1923

Larson Goes To Quentin, Year To Life

Life imprisonment in San Quentin prison is possible for Henry Larson under the judgement passed this morning by Superior Judge W. A. Anderson when the 27-year-old prisoner appeared in court for arraignment. Larson pleaded guilty without comment to mistreating an eleven-year-old Woodland grammar school girl, whom he lured to the Don Huff ranch at Yolo two weeks ago in an automobile, striking her on the head with his bare knuckles when she fought her assailant as he tried to dull her sensibilities with fumes from a small phial which he admitted contained chloroform. Larson escaped after he returned the girl to within a half a block of her home in Beamer Park and after five days hiding on Cache creek was captured when he made a dash for liberty in a car belonging to his former employer, C. D. Huff. The charge, prepared by District Atorney George T. Kern, alleging improper conduct toward the schoolgirl, was read by Deputy County Clerk Chester L. Hiddleson. When asked by Judge Anderson whether or not the prisoner desired to plead at this time, Larson assented with a nod of the head. He waived the right of representation by atorney and asked that sentence be immediately passed. Larson stated that he had nothing to say for himself or in mitigation of his crime, the most serious outside of murder, on the statute books. He accepted his sentence without a twitch of a muscle to indicate either remorse or regret. Judge Anderson advised the prisoner that the board of prisoner parole would hear the facts in his case and within a year would fix the punishment to be meted out for crimes of the kind. Larson will leave for San Quentin within the next few days to take up his future life there.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Tuesday Evening, May 1, 1923

Winters’ Bank Bandits Plead Guilty; To Serve Year To Life San Quentin

William Crum and Hamilton Merritt, Winters bank bandits, pleaded guilty to first degree robbery before Superior Judge W. A. Anderson this morning and were each sentenced to serve terms in San Quentin prison. The statute provides that the sentence shall not be less than one year and leaves the term open to the discretion of the board of prison parole which might fix the term to life imprisonment if it found that the facts justified such a punishment. Crum and Merritt left today with Henry Larson for San Quentin in charge of Sheriff J. W. Monroe and Lee R. Sinkey. All three are young, in their twenties, and all are charges with serious crimes, Larson having pleaded guilty to child stealing.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA Friday Evening, May 4, 1923

Henry Larson, charged with child stealing in connection with luring an eleven-year-old Woodland grammar school girl to the Don Huff ranch several weeks ago, was the third member of the prison party taken to San Quentin by Monroe and Lee R. Sinkey, who assisted in capturing Crum and Merritt. Larson was apparently unconcerned and rather accepted the affair with a degree of curiosity.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA, Wednesday, December 12, 1923

LARSON GIVEN 12 YEARS BY PRISON ADVISORY BOARD

Twelve years in prison confront Henry Larson, convicted of an attempted assault upon a little girl here. The San Quentin prison board meted out such a penalty to Larson at its meeting last night. A fifty-year term was possible. For four days and nights, Larson eluded the officers here, finally being captured at Washington, Yolo county, after a midnight dash in the stolen automobile of his former employer, Don Huff.


Here are the San Quentin Prison records for Henry T. Larson.


The San Quentin Prison records for Henry T. Larson.


Woodland Daily Democrat, Woodland, CA, Friday, January 3, 1930

YOLO PRISONER WINS PAROLE

Two Yolo county men now serving time in State penitentiaries have applied for parole and a third prisoner from Woodland has been granted his release providing he can obtain a job. Henry Y. Larson, Woodland youth, convicted of an attempted assault upon a young girl, has been granted his parole, his release to date from the time that he secures employment. Larson has been serving time in San Quentin since May 1, 1923. He was given a sentence of 1 to 50 years by the State Prison Board of Directors. His conduct has been good and he has tried for several weeks to obtain a job, but thus far he has been unsuccessful. He has written to Sheriff J. W. Monroe for assistance. Larson is believed to have the best chance for freedom. The prison authorities believe that he will live up to the terms of the parole already granted him if he is given a job.


The basis of Henry T. Larson's parole from San Quentin Prison was that he secure employment before release. The 1930 U. S. Census shows that he is a Helper in the home of William S. Longdon (a landscape gardener at a private place), who lives near Chowchilla, Ashview Twp., Madera Co., CA.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on May 10, 1930 shows Henry T. Larson (age 32) born in California of Swedish-born parents is an unmarried Farm Laborer living near Chowchilla in Ashview Twp., Madera Co., CA. He is listed as a Helper in the home of William S. Longdon (a landscape gardener at a private place).

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 4, 1930 shows Joe J. Meyer (age 53) born in Alabama to French-born parents and first married at age 23 is a General Farm Farmer owning his own farm free of a mortgage and living in Strauss Twp., Cotton Co., OK. Living with him is his wife, Elizabeth Meyer (age 52) born in Illinois to Swiss-born parents and first married at age 22. Also living there are his four unmarried children, all born in Oklahoma to Alabama and Illinois-born parents: Jeanette Meyer (age 22); Le Roy Meyer (age 20), a General Farm Farmer; Beatrice Meyer (age 17); and Alvin Meyer (age 11).

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson and Ruby Frances Handley were married June 12, 1932, in Merced Co., CA, when she was 14 years old. He fathered two sons, but disappeared shortly after son #2 was born.

Robert Franklin "Bob" Larson was born November 10,  1933, in Merced Co., CA.

Leroy Stanley "Roy" Larson was April 22, 1935, in Merced Co., CA.

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson deserted his family about 1935 in Merced Co., CA.

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson and Ruby Frances (Handley) Larson were divorced about 1936 - 1937.

Samuel Franklin Handley died June 21, 1934, in Sacramento Co., CA.

The 1940 U. S. Census taken on April 27, 1940, shows Donald Meyer (age 31) born in Oklahoma, and 5 years ago was living in Merced Co., CA, and with 2 years of High School, is a married Laborer for a Building Contractor, who owns his home worth $888 and is living at 44 Twelfth Street, City of Merced, Merced Co., CA. Living with him are: his wife, Francis Meyer (age 22) born in Kansas, and 5 years ago was living in Merced Co., CA, and with 8 years of School; his son, Bobbie Meyer (age 6) born in California, and 5 years ago was living in Merced Co., CA, and with 0 years of School; and his son, LeRoy Meyer (age 5) born in California, and 5 years ago was living in Merced Co., CA, and with 0 years of School.

The 1940 U. S. Census taken on April 3, 1940, shows Clarence Larson (age 51) born in California, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 8 years of School, is a married Carpenter Foreman of Home Construction, who owns his home worth $2,000 and is living at 515 North, City of Woodland, Yolo Co., CA. Living with him are: his wife, Georgie E. Larson (age 48) born in Texas, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 8 years of School; and his married brother, Henry Larson (age 42) born in California, and 5 years ago was living in Merced Co., CA, and with 8 years of School.

Henry Thaddeus/Tandy Larson died April 6, 1950, at the Napa State Hospital, near Imola, Napa Co., CA, at age 53.

Ruby Frances (Handley) Meyer died May 15, 1992, in Kelso, Cowlitz Co., WA, at age 74.

Leroy Donald Meyer died October 29, 1993, in Kelso, Cowlitz Co., WA, at age 84.


Handley, Handly, Hanley Collection, by Randall J. Handly
 

(Mb-7)

John Handley - Nov 11, 1819 - Oct 04, 1881                  m. Nov 16, 1848
Mary Bishop  - Feb 20, 1832 - Aug 21, 1917                   12c.

He was born in Knox Co. and she in Richland Co., Ohio. The 1880 census dated June 16, 1880 states that he was a farmer in Walker township, Jasper Co., Ind. His father is believed to be James born in Virginia and mother in Penn. After his death, the family moved to Formosa, Jewell Co., Ks. in 1893 by covered wagon, starting from Crown Point, Ind. Mary was a daughter of John and Mary Bishop. She second married a Disken and 3rd married a Hicks. She died in Elk Falls, Ks.

ch. -

 1. Rachel Jane       Handley - Jul 26, 1850 - May 31, 1929
 2. James             Handley - Jan 02, 1852 - Jan 28, 1935
 3. Margaret Ann      Handley - Feb 18, 1854 - Dec 26, 1924
 4. Sarah Rebecca     Handley - May 05, 1856 - Oct 13, 1873
 5. William           Handley - Mar 30, 1858 - Mar 23, 1911
 6. John Douglas      Handley - Jan 26, 1861 - Jan 29, 1936
 7. George Washington Handley - Mar 14, 1863 - Jan 29, 1936
 8. Susan Saphronia   Handley - Mar 30, 1865 - May 22, 1936
 9. Mayetta           Handley - Dec 11, 1867 - May 27, 1888
10. Leora May         Handley - Aug 02, 1870 - May 27, 1934
11. Samuel Franklin   Handley - Aug 12, 1873 - Jun 21, 1934
12. Henry Clayton     Handley - Jun 01, 1876 - Dec 08, 1960
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Rachel Jane Handley - Jul 26, 1850 - May 31, 1929          m.
William     Patrick -              -
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James   Handley - Jan 02, 1852 - Jan 28, 1935              m.
Mary J.         -              -
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Margaret Ann Handley   - Feb 18, 1854 - Dec 26, 1924       m.
             Castelman -              -
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William Handley - Mar 30, 1858 - Mar 23, 1911              m.
Ellen A.        -              -
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Susan Saphronia Handley - Mar 30, 1865 - May 22, 1936      m.
                Omer    -              -
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Leora May Handley - Aug 02, 1870 - Apr 13, 1928            m.
          Green   -              -
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Samuel Franklin Handley - Aug 12, 1873 - Jun 21, 1934      m.
Francis         McKee   -              -
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Henry Clayton      Handley - Jun 01, 1876 - Dec 08, 1960   m. Aug 08, 1901
Jeanette Elizabeth McKee   - Jul 19, 1875 - Jan 06, 1965    2c.

He was born at Crown Point, Ind. They were married in Formosa, Ks. "Nettie", as she was known, was born near Ames, Ia., the daughter of Davis Charles McKee and Emeline C. Finch. Both Henry and Nettie died in Topeka, Ks. and are buried in Hinton, Okla.

ch. -

1.                  Handley -              -
2. Gilbert Douglas Handley - Jan 07, 1904 -
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Gilbert Douglas Handley - Jan 07, 1904 -                   m. Aug 15, 1925
Lila Laverne    George  - Nov 29, 1907 - Dec 09, 1966       1c.

He was born in Jewell Co., Ks. and she in Soldier, Ks. She was a daughter of Frances Marion George and Annie Laurie Brewer. She died in Campbell, Calif.

ch. -

1. Gilbert Norman Handley - May 18, 1926 -
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Gilbert Norman Handley  - May 18, 1926 -                   m.
Vera May       McKinley - Jul 19, 1929 -

He was born in Topeka, Ks. and she in San Jose, Calif. He is the researcher for this lineage and currently resides at 16120 Azalea Way, Los Gatos, Ca. 95030.