Dora Agnes Bickett


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Robert Edwin Thompson was born June 17, 1849, in Goshen, Orange Co., NY, and died June 2, 1884, at the Mount Pleasant Insane Asylum, Mount Pleasant, Henry Co., IA, at age 34. Buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Muscatine, Bloomington Twp., Muscatine Co., IA. He is the son of Benjamin Woodruff Thompson of Goshen, Orange Co., NY, and Elizabeth St John of Mount Hope, Orange Co., NY, who were married October 29, 1846, in Deer Park, Suffolk Co., NY. Robert is a 1870 graduate of the Columbia University Medical Department, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, NY. His father Benjamin is an 1844 graduate of New York University, Medical College, New York City, NY. By 1881, Robert Edwin Thompson had been expelled from the Muscatine County Medical Society.

Francis Williams "Fanny" Waters was born July 28, 1855, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA, and died September 23, 1917, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, at age 62. Buried in Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. She is the daughter of Ozias Phelps "O. P." Waters of Franklin, Delaware Co., NY, and Ellen E. "Nellie" Klein of Georgia. Primary Cause of Death: Mitral and Aortic Insufficiency; Contributory Cause of Death: Gastritis and Bronchitis. Had lived in Texas for about 30 years (about 1887). Ozias Phelps "O. P." Waters and Ellen E. Klein were married October 28, 1854, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Florence Waters?

Robert Edwin Thompson (age 24) and Francis Williams "Fanny" Waters (age 18) were married October 15, 1873, at Trinity Episcopal Church, Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.

Robert Edwin Thompson and Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) Thompson had two children and one adopted child:

  1. Albert M. Thompson: Born July 8, 1874, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA; Died October 11, 1877, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA (age 3).
  2. Robert Marion Thompson: Born July 18, 1877, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA; Died Unknown.

Robert Edwin Thompson and Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) Thompson had one adopted child:

  1. George Waters Thompson: Born August 20, 1877, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA; Died December 31, 1880, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA (age 3). He is likely the illegitimate son of Miss Mary Ann Gordon, and was adopted by Robert Edwin Thompson and Francis Williams "Fannie" (Waters) Thompson.

Robert Edwin Thompson and Francis Williams "Fannie" (Waters) Thompson were divorced May 15, 1884, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.

Robert Edwin Thompson died June 2, 1884, in Mount Pleasant Insane Asylum, Mount Pleasant, Henry Co., IA, at age 34.

Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) Thompson then married Glen Deshler Fletcher.

Glen Deshler Fletcher was born June 23, 1854, in Long Prairie, Wahnahta, Minnesota Territory, and died May 22, 1920, at 1030 Fifteenth Street, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA, at age 65. Buried in Greenwood Memorial Park and Mortuary, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA. He is the son of Jonathan Emerson Fletcher of Thetford Center, Orange Co., VT, and Frances Louisa Kendrick of Thetford Center, Orange Co., VT.

Glen Deshler Fletcher (age 29) and Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) Thompson (age 28) were married June 15, 1884, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.

Glen Deshler Fletcher and Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) (Thompson) Fletcher had no children.

Glen Deshler Fletcher and Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) (Thompson) Fletcher were divorced about 1889 in Galveston, TX?

Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) (Thompson) Fletcher then married Willoughby Joseph Chapman.

Willoughby Joseph Chapman was born December 23, 1860, in Sheepwash, Devonshire, England, and died January 28, 1926, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, at age 65. Buried in Galveston Memorial Park, Hitchcock, Galveston Co., TX. He is the son of Alfred Chapman of Devonshire, England, and Elizabeth "Bessie" Mahala Duffy/Dufty of Winkleigh, Devonshire, England. 

Willoughby Joseph Chapman (age 29) and Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) Fletcher (age 35) were married December 17, 1890, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Grover, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Marriage License issued December 16, 1890, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX.

Willoughby Joseph Chapman and Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) (Thompson) (Fletcher) Chapman had one child:

  1. Dorothy Virginia Chapman: Born about October, 1902, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX; Died 1921 - 1926 in Unknown. Never married.

Francis Williams "Fanny" (Waters) (Thompson) (Fletcher) Chapman died September 23, 1917, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, at age 62.

Willoughby Joseph Chapman then married Dora Agnes Bickett.

Dora Agnes "Aggie" Bickett was born August 22, 1888, in Xenia Twp., Greene Co., OH, and died May 15, 1954, at her home, 1103 29th Street, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, at age 65. Buried in Galveston Memorial Park, Hitchcock, Galveston Co., TX. She is the daughter of George McVey Bickett of Xenia Twp., Greene Co., OH, and Ruth Elizabeth Simons of Clark Co., OH. 

Willoughby Joseph Chapman and Dora Agnes Bickett were married July 15, 1918, at the home of the officiating clergyman, the Rev. D. D. Dodds, on East Market street, Xenia, Greene Co., OH.

Willoughby Joseph Chapman and Dora Agnes (Bickett) Chapman had two children:

  1. Jean Elizabeth Chapman: Born April 25, 1919, at 1718 Avenue G, 3rd Ward, City of Galveston, Galveston Co., TX; Died April 13, 1988, in Houston, Harris Co., TX (age 70). Buried in Galveston Memorial Park, Hitchcock, Galveston Co., TX. Married September 30, 1940, at Central Methodist Church, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, to Harvey Michael Bashor Sr.: Born July 23, 1918, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX; Died September 6, 1954, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX (age 36). Buried in Galveston Memorial Park, Hitchcock, Galveston Co., TX.
  2. Robert Alfred Chapman: Born April 22, 1922, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Died July 3, 2015, in Galveston Co., TX (age 93). Buried in Galveston Memorial Park, Hitchcock, Galveston Co., TX. Married September 8, 1941, at the First Baptist Church, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, to Dorothy Elizabeth "Dot" Warren/Beall: Born August 19, 1922, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX; Died June 14, 2010, in Missoula, Missoula Co., MT (age 87). Buried in Western Montana State Veterans Cemetery, Missoula, Missoula Co., MT.



TIMELINE


Robert Edwin Thompson is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Muscatine, Bloomington Twp., Muscatine Co., IA.


An Illustrated History of the State of Iowa, being a complete civil, political, and military history of the state from its first exploration down to 1875, by Charles R. Tuttle; assisted by Daniel S. Durrie.  Chicago: R. S. Peale, 1876.

Gen. Jonathan E. Fletcher

Gen. Jonathan E. Fletcher was a native of Thetford, Vermont, and came to Muscatine in the summer of 1838, when Iowa was made a separate territory. He attended the first land sale in the territory, in November, 1838, at which he bought lands six miles west of the city, upon which he located in the fall of 1839, and went to farming, having previously returned to Vermont and married his surviving wife. He had resided a few years in Ohio before he came to Iowa. Gen. Fletcher held many responsible offices in this territory and state. He was a member of the convention which framed the old constitution, taking an important part in the formation of our fundamental law. In 1846, he was appointed, by President Polk, an Indian agent for the Winnebagoes, and served in that capacity eleven years; few agents were ever better calculated to manage a tribe of Indians. The Winnebagoes, Sioux and Chippewas were frequently at war, and he was often instrumental in saving much bloodshed. With quiet apprehension, decision and firmness, and great courage to face and surmount all difficulties, his valuable services in his long career as Indian agent, to the government, and to the country, are incalculable. Gen. Fletcher returned to his farm, one mile west of Muscatine, Ia., 1858, where he resided till his death. He left a wife and eight children, his eldest son a practicing physician at Detroit, Mich.


History of Muscatine County Iowa 1879,

OLD SETTLERS' ASSOCIATION

Gen. J. E. Fletcher came to Bloomington in the summer of 1838. He was a native of Thetford, Vt., and from that State he brought his wife. In 1839, he purchased lands about six miles from the county seat, and located thereon. His public life dates back to the Territorial days. He was one of the delegates, who framed the State Constitution, and, in 1846, was appointed Indian Agent for the Winnebagoes, which office he filled for eleven years. The location of the agency was twice moved during his administration. He first had quarters at Fort Atkinson; thence he moved to Mankato, on the Minnesota River; thence to a point above St. Paul. During his official term, the Winnebagoes, Sioux and Chippewas were frequently at war; but by his brave and judicious management, he generally averted disastrous results. During all those years of wild life and arduous duties, the General was accompanied by his wife, who rendered him great assistance. Mrs. Fletcher also devoted much time to the education of the Indians. The General, Mrs. Fletcher and their son, Dr. Fletcher, then a mere lad, became proficient in the Indian tongue. In 1858, the General returned to Muscatine County with his family. He was a man of noted character, of energy and industry. His death was mourned by many friends. He died in April, 1872.


Col. Jonathan E. Fletcher

Col. Jonathan E. Fletcher Owned land bought 01 Aug 1827 Monroe office Sec 26 Twp 5-S Range 4-E Meridian Michigan-Toledo Strip; Lenawee Co Col. J E Fletcher was captured and incarcerated in the Lenawee Co Jail at Tecumseh. A copy of the letter written by him May 5, 1835, tells of his imprisonment Colonel Fletcher, was retained to “test the validity of the arrest” and spent some months in custody in Tecumseh. Benjamin Baxter’s account of the events, found in Clara Waldron’s One Hundred Years – A Country Town, states that Fletcher was: "a genial gentleman not suffering apparently from his term of incarceration, but sometimes subjecting us to the inconvenience of hunting him up when we had occasion to use the jail for some counterfeiter or horse thief, as he was likely to be found out riding with one of the sheriff’s lovely daughters, having taken the jail keys with him."
Jonathan Emerson FLETCHER, eldest son of Joseph Fletcher, born in 1806, removed to Western New York in 1832, and to Ohio in 1833. In 1835 he was appointed by Governor LUCAS, of Ohio, with others, to re-mark the boundary between Ohio and Michigan. In 1838 he went to Muscatine, Iowa, and became a major-general of militia. He was a member of the convention which drafted the state constitution of Iowa, was elected state senator, and was twice appointed United States agent to the Winnebago Indians, serving twelve years. He was a General of the Union Army in the Civil War. He died in 1872 and is buried in the in the Glendale Cemetery, Summit Co, Ohio.


American Biographical Notes, The Chicago Historical Society, page 141

FLETCHER, JONATHAN EMERSON, b. in Hartford, Vt.; went to Ohio when young and settled at Muscatine, Iowa, in 1838; In 1846, was appointed Indian agent to the Winnebagoes and held 11 years; residing during this time at Port Atkinson, Iowa, and Long Prairie and Blue Earth, Minn.; returned to Muscatine in 1858; and d. April 6, 1872.


THE UNITED STATES BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY PORTRAIT GALLERY, Eminent and Self-made Men, IOWA VOLUME, Chicago and New York: American Biographical Publishing Company, 1878

Benjamin Woodruff Thompson, M. D.

Benjamin Woodruff Thompson, son of Robert Thompson and Susan nee Johnston, was born at Goshen, Orange Co, New York, on the 26th of April 1820. This branch of the Thompson family is descended from William Thompson. A native of Edgesworthstown, County Longford, Ireland. of Scotch linage, who was born about 1695, married Ann Jenkins in the year 1717, emigrated to America and settled in Goshen, Orange Co, New York, in the 1737. The following is a copy of the certificate from the church when in Ireland, the original of which is still preserved by the family archives. William Thompson and his wife Ann have lived many years in this neighborhood, and all along have behaved as it becometh Christians; have been members of the Protestant dissenting congregation, and may be received into Christian communion wherever Providence may cast their lot; and their children have behaved soberly and in offensively. Certified at Cork Bay, County Longford, Ireland, May 12, 1737. Jas Bond

William Thompson was the father of George Thompson, born in Ireland in the 1719, emigrated to America with his parents, and settled in Orange County, New York, where, in the year 1753, he married Elizabeth Wells and raised a family of four sons and one daughter. He died in the year 1782, in his sixty-third year of his age. William Thompson (grandfather of our subject) eldest son of George and Elizabeth Thompson was born in Goshen, New York on the 29th of July,1756; married Mittie Hudson (daughter of John Hudson and Hannah Coleman) on the 20th of March,1783, and had four sons and two daughters. He died on the 29th of February 1836, in the eightieth year of his age. Robert Thompson, second son of William and Mitty and the father of our subject, was born on the 24th of March. 1787. He married Susan H Johnston of Blooming Grove, Orange County, New York, on the 2nd of June 1810; had two sons and four daughters, of whom Benjamin W. is the eldest son. He died in November 1872, in the eighty-sixth year of his age. His widow, (mother of our subject) is living in Middletown, New York, in the eighty-eighth year of her age and can see to darn stockings with the aid of glasses. The family, which is still largely represented in that pastoral region (Orange County, New York), have been all tiller of the soil in time past, - men of substance and high character. The grandfather of our subject (William Thompson) was a captain of the light dragoons under General Washington during the revolutionary war. His sword and suit of captain's uniform, together with a grape shot fired from the enemy at the battle of Fort Montgomery, which plowed up the ground under the captain's feet, are now heirlooms in the family of our subject. Robert (the father of the doctor), was a soldier in the war of 1812,and a member of Captain Denton's company. He was a plain, plodding farmer, dealt largely in stock, and was a good honest business man, very highly esteemed in the community, but of retiring disposition, and rarely went into company. His wife was a most energetic and industrious woman, who in her early days was accustomed to manufacture fabrics from flax and wool, and afterward make them up into garments for her family, first spinning the flax and wool into yarn, them weaving it into cloth, and afterward manufacturing it into garments - all of her own hands. She was, moreover, a most exemplary Christian woman, and lives in the love and veneration of her children and a large circle of devoted friends. Benjamin W. Thompson was raised on his father's farm and received his preliminary education at the Farmer's Hall Academy, Orange county, then under Nathaniel Webb and James Mc Master, the latter being now the editor of the "Freeman's Journal," New York. Here he studied the usual English branches, the higher mathematics, and the Latin Language. At an early age he conceived a desire to become a physician, but his father demurred, preferring that his son should follow in his footsteps. Finding however, that the youth was bent on a profession, the latter's agreeing to defray the expenses of his education, he yielded his consent. Accordingly at the age of twenty years, he entered the office of Dr. James Horton, (now of Muscatine), at Goshen as a student, where he remained until 1844. Meantime he attended the usual courses of lectures at the medical department of the University of New York, being under the special direction of Dr. John H. Whitaker, then demonstrator of the anatomy in the University, being himself a graduate of the Edinburgh, Scotland, Medical College. The other members of the faculty at that time Mott, professor of surgery and clinical surgery; John H. Revere, professor of theory, and practice of medicine and clinical medicine; Granville S. Patterson (also a graduate of Edinburgh Medical College), professor of anatomy; Martin Pain, professor of materia medica and institution of medicine, etc; G. S. Bedford, professor of obstetrics, etc. From this institution our subject was graduated in 1844,and immediately commenced the practice of his profession in his own home, being the some twelve-hundred dollars in debt for his education. He soon after purchased the office and practice of his preceptor, Dr. Horton retaining him the latter in the partnership for one year, at the end of which time Dr. Horton removed to Muscatine, Iowa. Dr. Thompson at once took charge of the large practice of his predecessor, which extended over a radius of twelve from the village, employing four horses in the discharge of his duties. This he continued for ten years without intermission. In 1854 he sold his practice to his cousin, Dr. John H. Hudson, who had studied in his office, and followed his old friend Dr. Horton to Muscatine, Iowa, where he has since resided being now one of the oldest practicing physicians in the city. His contemporaries in the practice some twenty-three years ago were Drs. Reeder, Schok, Waters and Johnson - the two former since deceased- Dr Horton having relinquished the practice on moving to the west. Dr. Thompson soon built up a large an lucrative practice, established himself in the confidence and esteem of the people, and was always prompt in responding to the calls of duty, whether the patient was able to pay for professional services or not; being anxious only to relieve suffering.; hence he was called "the poor man's doctor" a title that speaks more in his behalf of fulsome adulation could do. His specialty, if he has any, is the practice of surgery, at which from the incipiency he devoted a remarkable talent, his preceptor Dr. Horton, being accustomed to hand him the knife and look on while his pupil performed some of the most critical operations with a dexterity rarely surpassed by the most experienced surgeons. In politics the doctor always adhered to the Jefferson school, but has meddled little in political affairs. nor held office, except that of Alderman of the city of Muscatine. During the years 1856, 1857, and 1858 he held the position of surgeon to the Orange Co. poor-house, small-pox, cholera and fever hospitals, and lunatic asylum. He was raised in the communion of the Presbyterian Church, and attended Sunday school until the age of twenty, but never united with the church. On the 29th of October 1846 he married Miss Elizabeth daughter of the Hon. Stephen St. John, of Port Jervis, New York, one of the best and noblest of her sex, an exemplary member of the Episcopal church and a promoter of every good and excellent work within the sphere of her influence. She died quite unexpectedly on the 12th of September, 1877, in the fifty-fourth year of her age. They have two children, sons. The eldest Stephen St. John, is a captain of a river steamboat, and the youngest Robert Edwin, has adopted the profession of his father, and is a graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, of New York city, and is a gentleman of considerable promise, Especially in the line of surgery, in which he rivals his father. They have had no daughters, but raised an orphan girl named Annie Mautche, whose parents died of cholera in the year 1857, and educated her as their own daughter. She is now the wife of Clarke Sheckelford Esq., of Des Moines, Iowa.


Ozias Phelps "O. P." Waters was born March 23, 1830.

The 1841 U. K. Census shows Joseph Chapman (age 40) is a Timber Merchant living on the Square in Sheepwash, Devonshire, England. Living with him is Rosamond Chapman (age 35); Mary Chapman (age 15); Joseph Chapman (age 12); Alfred Chapman (age 5); George Chapman (age 3); and Lydia Chapman (age 1). Elizabeth Sutton (age 15) and William Chapman (age 20) also live there. All were born in the same county.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 28, 1850, shows Edw. Kline (age 44) born in New York is a Clerk and is living in the 4th Ward, City of Saint Louis, Saint Louis Co., MO. Living with him is Caroline Kline (age 50) born in Georgia, with real estate of $3,000 and personal estate of $300. Also living there are: Mary A. Kline (age 20) born in Georgia; Edward Kline (age 18) born in Georgia, a Clerk; Ellen Kline (age 16) born in Georgia; Eugene Kline (age 11) born in Missouri; and Mary Daly (age 21) born in Ireland.

The 1851 U. K. Census shows Joseph Chapman (age 52) born in Black Torrington, Devonshire, England is a widowed Farmer and Timber Merchant Lumber living in the Village, Sheepwash, Devonshire, England. Living with him are his unmarried children: Elizabeth Chapman (age 24); Alfred Chapman (age 14); Lydia Chapman (age 11); and Herbert Chapman (age 9). Also living there is his unmarried niece, Ann Dufty (age 24). Two servants also live in the household.

Francis Williams "Fanny" Waters was born July 28, 1855, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.

The 1856 Iowa State Census taken 1856 shows R. W. Thompson (age 36) Born in New York is a married Physician and is living in Bloomington Twp., Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him are: Elizabeth Thompson (age 24) born in New York, a married female; Stephen Thompson (age 7) born in New York; and Robert Thompson (age 6) born in New York.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 9, 1860, shows J. E. Fletcher (age 53) born in Vermont with real estate of $55,500 and personal estate of $1,420 is a Farmer and is living in Bloomfield Twp., Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him are: Frances L. Fletcher (age 40) born in Vermont; Frank E. Fletcher (age 19) born in Iowa, a Farmer; Eve Fletcher (age 10) born in Minnesota; Samuel E. Fletcher (age 8) born in Minnesota; Glenn R. Fletcher (age 6) born in Minnesota; Ella G. Fletcher (age 4) born in Minnesota; Augustus Borett (age 23) born in Wisconsin, a Farm Laborer; Richard Pickett (age 24) born in Ireland, a Farm Laborer; and Mary Cronian (age 19) born in England, a House Servant.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 23, 1860, shows B. W. Thompson (age 40) Born in New York with real estate of $3,000 and personal estate of $300 is a M. D. Physician and is living in the City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him are: Elizabeth Thompson (age 35) born in New York; Stephen Thompson (age 12) born in New York; Edward Thompson (age 11) born in New York; and Ann Mautche (age 12) born in Germany.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 25, 1860, shows O. P. Waters (age 30) born in New York with personal estate of $250 is a Clerk and is living in the 1st Ward, City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him are: Ellen Waters (age 26) born in Georgia; Fanny Waters (age 5) born in Iowa; Bub. Waters (age 7/12) born in Iowa; and Jane Huntchon (age 20) born in Ireland.

Willoughby Joseph Chapman was born December 22, 1860, in Sheepwash, Devonshire, England.

The 1861 U. K. Census shows Alfred Chapman (age 24) born in Sheepwash, Devonshire, England is a Lumber Merchant employing two men and living in Sheepwash, Devonshire, England. Living with him is his wife, Bessie Chapman (age 23) born in Winkleigh, Devonshire, England. Also living there is his son, Willoughby Jos. Chapman (age 3 mos.) born in Sheepwash, Devonshire, England.

Ellen E. (Klein) Waters died January 20, 1866, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.


Joseph G. Gordon, Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.


The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 15, 1870, shows J. G. Gordon (age 53) born in Maryland with real estate of $20,000 and personal estate of $10,000 is a Merchant and is living in the 1st Ward, City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him is M. A. Gordon (age 37) born in Georgia, who is Keeping House. Living next door included: O. P. Waters (age 39) born in New York; Fannie Waters (age 15) born in Iowa; and Nelli Waters (age 5) born in Iowa. Leigh Larson note: In 1869 and 1874, John G. Gordon owned a hardware and dry goods store. John is not living in 1879. In 1877, Eugene Klein was manager of the Estate of J. G. Gordon, living at Cherry Street.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on July 28, 1870, shows J. E. Fletcher (age 64) born in Vermont with real estate of $26,500 and personal estate of $15,000 is a Farmer and is living in the 1st Ward, City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him are: F. L. Fletcher (age 52) born in Vermont, who is Keeping House; S. E. Fletcher (age 18) born in Iowa, a Farmer; Glenn D. Fletcher (age 16) born in Minnesota; Wm. K. Fletcher (age 8) born in Iowa; Lyle Fletcher (age 6) born in Iowa; E. G. Fletcher (age 13) born in Minnesota; and Grace Fletcher (age 11) born in Massachusetts.

The 1871 U. K. Census shows Samuel Dufty (age 36) born in Winkleigh, Devonshire, England is a Farmer of 400 Acres employing 8 men and a boy and living in Winkleigh, Devonshire, England. Living with him is his wife, his mother-in-law, and his nephew: Willoughby J. Chapman (age 10) a Scholar, born in Sheepwash, Devonshire, England. Several servants also live in the household.

Alfred Chapman (age 34), a Farmer, immigrated from England to Boston in 1870.

Bessie Chapman (age 53), a Wife, and her children emigrated from England, departing Liverpool, England aboard the S. S. City of London, arriving in the Port of New York on April 25, 1871. Children are: Wm. Chapman (age 8), Rosy Chapman (age 7), Alfred Chapman (age 6), Herbert Chapman (age 5), Annie Chapman (age 4), and Nelly Chapman age 1, Infant).

Robert Edwin Thompson (age 24) and Francis Williams "Fanny" Watters (age 18) were married October 15, 1873, at Trinity Episcopal Church, Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 7, 1880, shows Robt. E. Thompson (age 30) born in New York to New York-born parents is a Physician and Surgeon and is living on Cedar Street, 2nd Ward, City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him are: his wife, Fanny Thompson (age 24) born in Iowa to New York and Georgia-born parents, who is Keeping House; his son, George Thompson (age 2) born in Iowa to New York and Iowa-born parents; Mary Johnson (age 18) born in Iowa to English-born parents, an unmarried Domestic Servant; and Benj. W. Thompson (age 60) born in New York, a Physician and Surgeon.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 21, 1880, shows Frances L. Fletcher (age 62) born in Vermont is a widowed Head of Household and and is living in the 1st Ward, City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with her are her unmarried children: Samuel E. Fletcher (age 27) born in Iowa, a Salesman in a Lumber Yard; Glenn D. Fletcher (age 25) born in Minnesota, who Works in Railroad Depot; Grace Fletcher (age 21) born in Massachusetts; Wm. K. Fletcher (age 18) born in Iowa; Lyle Fletcher (age 6) born in Iowa; and Eve Fletcher (age 30) born in Minnesota, who is Disabled.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 15, 1880, shows Willouby Chapman (age 19) born in England to English-born parents is an unmarried Tinner and is boarding in Parson Creek Twp., Linn Co., MO.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 14, 1880, shows Mary A. Gordon (age 46) born in Georgia to New York and Georgia-born parents is a widow who is Keeping House and is living in the 1st Ward, City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with her is her son: Alexander G. Gordon (age 14) born in Iowa. In 1883, M. A. Gordon was a widow living at 715 W. 4th Street in Muscatine.

Gen. John G. Gordon was born February 16, 1810, in Baltimore, MD. Married September 25, 1856, in Muscatine, IA, to Mary Ann (Klein) Dougherty.


REGISTER OF OLD SETTLERS , BOOK One, pages 72 & 73

PASSED AWAY.

Gen. John G. Gordon no More - A Brief Sketch of an Honorable and Useful Life.

For several days the community has been expecting, with painful and anxious hearts, the dread news of the death of Gen. John G. Gordon. At 2 o’clock this morning the end came, and the spirit of the beloved husband, and father, the honored citizen and esteemed friend, crossed the dark flood, to mingle with the celestial band on the other shore. Surrounded by weeping wife and children, sweetly, peacefully, like a child hushed to gentle slumber, and unconscious of the physical pain too often inflicted by the arrows of Death, he sank to rest, only the still pulse and marble-like features indicating the great transition from time to eternity.

“So fades the summer cloud away,
So sinks the gale when storms are o’er,
So gently shuts the eye of day,
So dies the wave upon the shore.”

Thus passed away one of Muscatine’s oldest and most esteemed citizens one whose form and face and pleasant voice and kind greeting were familiar to the young and old of the city. It will be remembered that the cause of his death was a paralytic affection. Until this sudden and unexpected attack he had been remarkably free from disease, never before having, in his recollection, been ill a day, and never, practically speaking, having taken medicine. The attack which loosed “the silver chord” of life came on Saturday evening, Dec. 16, two weeks ago last Saturday. It was about 7 o’clock, and Mr. Gordon was in the store standing by the counter, listening to the reading of the evening paper by his associate, Eugene Klein, when he experienced a singularly painful sensation, and, on the impulse of the moment, started towards the door. It was noticed by Eugene that one leg seemed to drag heavily, and that it seemed to be a painful effort to walk. On reaching a point about half way between the stove and the front door, the General stopped and leaned over the counter, evidently in distress. In reply to the tender inquiries of Eugene he remarked that he felt very strangely. Eugene and Mr. Hunt, the head clerk, at once assisted him home. He then left the store, never to return. For a day or two he was able to move about the house, and hopes of his recovery were entertained, but his strength gradually failed and he, was soon compelled to keep his bed. During the last week or ten days of his illness the General was only conscious at intervals, the trouble having, it seemed, most seriously affected the brain. It is believed that the attack was superinduced by a severe fall received on the steps of his house last spring.

We can give here only a brief sketch of the eventful life of this well-known and loved citizen. He was born in Baltimore, Md., February 16, 1810, his age being nearly 67 years. At an early age he was sent to York, Pa., to serve an apprenticeship for the mercantile business. When a young man he removed to Louisville, Ky., and there embarked in business for himself. After a short but very successful career here, he transferred his headquarters to Pittsburg, Pa., and such was the popularity he had gained at Louisville that he carried with him in his new home a large part of his old custom. In the spring of 1844, following the tide of emigration and the course of the empire, he came west and located in Muscatine, commencing business as a general merchant. His first stand was an old frame standing on the site of the brick now occupied by McQuesten and Sawyer; his next a similar structure standing where Mr. Gerndt has his meat market, next to Dougherty’s drug store. He occupied this stand till 1851, when he completed and moved into the handsome brick block which is so well known as the store of J. G. Gordon & Co. During all those busy years his has been the controlling spirit in the store. For eight years - from 1866 to 1871 - O. P. Waters, Esq., was a partner, and for several years before and ever since Eugene Klein, his brother-in-law, was associated with him in the business, but the General has ever taken a pride in giving his personal attention to its supervision, and the customer who entered the store without being greeted by the General himself with a hearty salutation, a cheery word, a bright smile and a cordial hand-shake would have felt as if something was wrong.

In his business relations, the General ranks with the pioneers of the city and the best-known and most prominent and influential in the State. In earlier times, when dry goods, groceries, hardware and queensware were combined, his trade commanded a sweep of country taking in a radius of from 100 to 140 miles, and his large establishment was known as one of the finest and most extensive in the west. His popularity as a merchant was commensurate with the extent of his trade. Every one liked to deal with one who was at once so courteous, obliging and straightforward in his commerce with all.

General Gordon was twice married first at Louisville, to Miss Sarah Reinard, who bore him six children (five daughters and one son) and second, in 1856, in Muscatine, to the widow of James M. Dougherty, and daughter of Edward Klein, by whom he had one son and one daughter. All his children are living save the daughter by his second marriage. His surviving daughters are Ella, wife of Wm. R. Stone, and Mary, wife of Col. J. B. Culver, both of Duluth, Minn.; Susan, wife of W. S. Humphreys, of St Louis; Maria, Wife of M. W. Griffin, of Muscatine, and Miss Annie, at home. Gardner, the elder son, has been in St Louis the past few years, and Glenn, the younger, is at home.

The distinguished title of “General” was bestowed on Mr. Gordon in 1847 by Governor Ansel Briggs, of Iowa. The commission, the original of which we were shown, was dated at Iowa City June 27, and appointed the General to the command of “the second division of Iowa militia.” We do not hear that he ever performed any active service, but the appointment was a deserved recognition of the worth and talents of a prominent and esteemed citizen.

Though at home no man stood higher in the confidence and affections of the people than Mr. Gordon, we believe that during his long residence here he held but one public office, and that was the humble municipal trust of alderman. Not that he was not urged to serve the public with his clear judgment and fine abilities, but that it was a part of the philosophy of his life to abstain from active participation in politics, preferring rather the quiet and pleasures of home and the honors of a successful business to the turmoil and strife of the political arena. As a Mason, however, he was one of the oldest and most esteemed members of the order.

General Gordon will be missed in every walk and circle of Muscatine life and society. Prominent and active in business; liberal and zealous in forwarding public enterprises; denial, intelligent and communicative in society, with a rich store of anecdote and reminiscence to entertain friends, his death will leave a void hard to fill and bring a pang to every heart. Who that was not familiar with his fine figure and handsome presence as he made his regular diurnal trips between the store and house? Time, with his magic wand, had touched him but lightly; yea, so gently that in his more than thirty years of reputable citizenship he seemed but little changed, either as to the cheerful and intellectual face or the lively and sympathetic spirit animating him, and he glided almost imperceptibly into the ripeness of old age. At heart, he was kindness itself. Talmage told us that a single flash would sometimes reveal all the secret springs in a man’s life, and so a simple incident will serve to illustrate Gen. Gordon’s character. On the bitterly cold Friday just before his illness, a well-known professional beggar, a woman, came into the store to solicit charity. She stood near the door some little time without receiving attention, when the General chanced to observe her for the first time. Hastening forward he placed a piece of money in her hand and politely bowed her out, remarking on his return that he “couldn’t turn a dog away without something on such a day.”

But we cannot speak further of those admirable traits of character which so endeared him to his relatives and immediate friends and made him personally so popular. His long life of usefulness and activity will be an enduring monument that speaks more eloquently than words and will keep his memory green. The General was a regular attendant at Trinity church, and was one of its most zealous and liberal supporters.

The bereaved widow and children of deceased have the deepest sympathy of the community in their sore affliction.

The funeral will take place from the family residence on Second street, on Saturday, at 10 ½ o’clock a. m. The pall-bearers selected are: H. W. Moore, G. A. Garrettson, P. Jackson, F. H. Stone, J. Carskaddan, A. Jackson, John Lemp, J. J. Hoopes and J. P. Ament.


Dr. R. E. Thompson was living in an asylum on December 13, 1883, when his father died, according to his father's obituary. On the death of his mother, his father surrendered himself to a depression of spirits, which became almost a settled melancholia on Dr. R. E. Thompson, being adjudged insane was removed to the Mount Pleasant asylum.

Robert Edwin Thompson died June 2, 1884, at the Mount Pleasant Insane Asylum, Mount Pleasant, Henry Co., IA, at age 34. Buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Muscatine, Bloomington Twp., Muscatine Co., IA. The asylum is known by many names, some of which include: the Mount Pleasant Insane Asylum, the Mount Pleasant Hospital for the Insane, and the Mount Pleasant Mental Health Institute.

Glen Deshler Fletcher (age 29) and Francis Williams "Fannie" (Waters) Thompson (age 28) were married June 15, 1884, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.


The Burlington Weekly Hawk-Eye, Burlington, Des Moines Co., IA, Tuesday, June 17, 1884

CITY BRIEFS.

Mrs. Fannie Waters Thompson was married to Mr. Glenn Fletcher, of Muscatine, on Sunday morning.


The 1885 Iowa State Census shows Glen Fletcher (age 30) born in Massachusetts is a married ??? and is living at 203 East 2nd Street, Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with him is a married female, Fanny Fletcher (age 28) born in Muscatine, IA, who is Keeping House.

The 1885 Iowa State Census shows Mary A. Gordon (age 50) born in Georgia is a widow who Keeps House and is living at 702 W. 3rd Street, Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA. Living with her is Glenn A. Gordon (age 19) born in Muscatine Co., IA, an unmarried Clerk in a Bank. Also living there is a widow: Caroline Klein (age 74) born in Georgia, who Keeps House. Also living there is Nellie E. Waters (age 18) born in Muscatine Co., IA, who is unmarried.

Dora Agnes Bickett was born August 22, 1888, in Xenia Twp., Greene Co., OH.


The Newton Daily Republican, Newton, Harvey Co., KS, Sunday, December 11, 1887

PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

G. D. Fletcher, of St. Louis, made a business call in our city yesterday.


The Newton Daily Republican, Newton, Harvey Co., KS, Thursday, January 5, 1888

PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

Mrs. G. D. Fletcher has moved from East Ninth street and taken up her abode at the hotel Clark.


The Newton Daily Republican, Newton, Harvey Co., KS, Wednesday, April 4, 1888

Instruction in Painting.

Mrs. G. D. Fletcher desires a number of pupils for instruction in oil and water color painting, pastel and crayon work. Also in sketching in still life and nature. Further information as to terms etc., can be learned at Miss Coult's book store, where specimens of work are on exhibition.


The Newton Daily Republican, Newton, Harvey Co., KS, Friday, June 29, 1888

PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

Mrs. G. D. Fletcher left last evening for Burlington, Iowa, in answer to a telegram announcing the dangerous illness of her father.


Ozias Phelps "O. P." Waters died June 28, 1888, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA, at age 58.


The Burlington Weekly Hawk-Eye, Burlington, Des Moines Co., IA, Thursday, July 5, 1888

GONE FROM EARTH

Death of Mr. O. P. Waters, a Prominent Citizen and Mason.

A few minutes before twelve o'clock Wednesday night Mr. O. P. Waters died at his home on South Gunnison street. He had been suffering for some time from an ailment of the liver which finally resulted in an ailment of the heart. Upon several occasions of late it had been made manifest that that organ was badly affected and that serious trouble was to be expected. About twelve days ago he became quite ill and Monday his case assumed a critical aspect, nothing less than a serious stroke of apoplexy appearing, complicated with paralysis of the left side. This became so bad that he was unable to receive any food and, although he slightly rallied late Wednesday afternoon, his death occurred at the time named. His last moments were calm, a quiet cessation of life's forces. Ozias Phelps Waters was born in Franklin, Delaware county, New York, March 23, 1830. In 1848 he came to the west, settled at Muscatine and engaged in the business of merchandising. In 1876 he came to this city and organized the Centennial Mutual Life association, of which he was president and manager and which was highly successful in his hands. He left the company about three years ago and since then has been connected with the life and general insurance business here and elsewhere, remaining so engaged until the time of his death. He was a good insurance man and commanded respect in all his dealings with his fellows in that business. In 1883 he was elected alderman of the fourth ward and served a full term of two years in a highly creditable manner, good sense and good business ideas making him one of the best aldermen our city ever had. Mr. Waters was a prominent Mason, an active worker in the order and thoroughly schooled in all the mysteries of the craft. He was initiated into symbolic Masonry in Hawkeye Lodge No. 30, September 23, 1853. He was made a Royal Arch Mason in August, 1865, elected Excellent King June 29, 1866, and High Priest in 1870 and re-elected in 1871. In Cryptic Masonry he passed the circle December 13, 1866; was elected Right Illustrious Master October, 1868, and Captain of the Guard, October, 1870. In the Commandery he was crested a Knight Templar October 12, 1865, DeMolay Commandery, No. 1; chosen Captain General in 1866, and Eminent Commander in 1868; which office he ably filled by re-election for several years. In the grand lodge he first appeared at the annual communication in 1863, held in Iowa City, and afterward at the sessions of 1867, 1868, 1869 and a870. In the latter year he was appointed Deputy Grand Master, and was elected by very flattering majorities to the office of Grand Master in the years of 1871 and 1872 and in the Grand Commandery he was chosen Grand Captain General in 1867, Grand Senior Warden in 1870 and 1871, Deputy Grand Commander in 1872, and Grand Commander in 1875. He remained a zealous member of the order until the day of his death.

Mr. Waters was married in 1853 to Miss Ellen E. Klein of Muscatine, who died thirteen years later. In 1866 he was again married to Mrs. Emma Campbell of Mt. Pleasant, who survives him. Three children were born of the first marriage: Mrs. Fannie Fletcher of Newton, Kansas, and Mrs. Nellie Mc Murphy of Osborn, Idaho, both living. The other child, a son of more than ordinary promise, was drowned in 1869 and his death was a severe blow to his father, by whom he was most tenderly cherished. In addition to these members of his own family he leaves one brother, Dr. Charles O. Waters, of Chicago, and two sisters, Mrs. E. Fitch of Avoca, Iowa, and Mrs. Dr. King, wife of the famed Methodist minister of New York. These relatives have all been notified, together with his old and intimate friend, Gov. Buren R. Sherman. Arrangements for the funeral depend upon the word that comes from them.

Mr. Waters was a man of the coolest, calmest judgment, composed and unruffled under all circumstances, and like all such men, was clear headed; had original and positive ideas and knew how to speak them and to defend his position. He was capable of using the keenest and most cutting sarcasm, but had a host of warm friends here and was generally respected as a man of honor and a gentleman. He will be greatly missed.


The Newton Daily Republican, Newton, Harvey Co., KS, Thursday, August 30, 1888

Miss Hermione Schreiver has been appointed one of the military aides and Mrs. G. D. Fletcher, general aide, by managers of the Kirmess. Miss Scheiveley will act as bugler in the battle scene of the Sepoy Rebellion.


The Newton Daily Republican, Newton, Harvey Co., KS, Wednesday, July 23, 1890

PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

G. D. Fletcher, formerly a Newton resident but now of Galveston, is in the city to-day.


The Newton Daily Republican, Newton, Harvey Co., KS, Tuesday, September 21, 1897

PERSONAL MENTION.

G. D. Fletcher, the well-known traveling man was in the city a short time yesterday afternoon and called on a number of merchants.


Omaha, NE, Directories, 1889 Record shows Willoughby J. Chapman: r 2205 Farnam; W F and American Ex Co; cashier; Omaha, NE


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Thursday, October 31, 1890

Appointed General Manager

Mr. W. J. Chapman, who for several years past has served as agent of the Wells-Fargo Express company in this city, has been elected general manager of the Galveston Packing company. The stockholders of this company have displayed wisdom in this selection, as Mr. Chapman is a thorough business man and has proven successful in what he has heretofore undertaken. It is by no means likely this new move on his part will prove an exception.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Monday, November 10, 1890

A Change of Agents.

Mr. A. D. Chapman arrived in the city and assumed the position of agent of the Wells Fargo Express company last Saturday. He was formerly in charge of the company's office at Gainesville. Mr. Chapman succeeds his brother, W. J. Chapman, who resigned to accept the management of the Galveston Packing company.


Willoughby Joseph Chapman (age 29) and Fannie Williams (Waters) Fletcher (age 35) were married December 17, 1890, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Grover, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Leigh Larson notes: Marriage License issued December 16, 1890, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. George Washington Grover was born about November 19, 1819, in Sacketts Harbor, NY. His wife, Eliza Ann (Crane) Grover, was born March 19, 1834, in St. Marks, FL.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Thursday, December 18, 1890

The Nuptial Knot.

Yesterday evening, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Grover, were celebrated the nuptials of their cousin, Fannie W. Fletcher, and Willoughby J. Chapman. The wedding was a quiet one, only the immediate relatives and most intimate friends of the contracting parties being present. Though quiet, it was none the less brilliant, and the participating will long remember the festive occasion. The bride has endeared herself to her many friends in Galveston and Mr. Chapman is well known in town as the agent of Wells Fargo's Express company for the past three years, and more recently as the general manager of the Galveston Packing company.


The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 14, 1900, shows George M. Bickett (age 48) born September 1851 in Ohio to Ohio-born parents is a plumber married for 24 years living in his own home in Xenia, Xenia Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is his wife Ruth E. Bickett (age 47) born in Ohio to New York-born parents, with 5 of her 6 children still alive. Also living at home are all five of the living children, all unmarried and born in Ohio: Arnold R. Bickett (age 23) born August 1876, not employed and can not read or write; Maud F. Bickett (age 22) born February 1878 and not employed; Leroy Mc Bickett (age 18) born May 1882 and is a blacksmith; Manley E. Bickett (age 14) born September 1885; and Dora A. Bickett (age 11) born August 1888.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 4, 1900, shows Willoughby Chatman (age 38) born December 1861 in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1871 and a Naturalized citizen is a Fish Company Manager owning his own home with a mortgage and is living at 1807 Rosenberg Avenue, 8th Ward, City of Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Living with him is his wife of 9 years, Fannie Chatman (age 38) born July 1861 in Iowa to New York and Georgia-born parents, with none of the two children born to her still alive.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 1, 1900, shows Alfred Chapman (age 64) born May 1836 in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1870 and a Naturalized citizen is a Bank Clerk owning his own mortgaged home and living in the 1st Ward, City of Trenton, Trenton Twp., Grundy Co., MO. Living with him is his wife of 39 years, Bessie M. Chapman (age 62) born June 1837 in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1871. Also living there is his unmarried daughter, Rosamond Chapman (age 37) born July 1862 in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1871, who is a Dress Maker.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 5, 1900, shows Mary Gordon (age 67) born July, 1832, in Florida to New York and Georgia-born parents with none of the 4 children born to her still alive is a widow who owns her own home free of a mortgage and is living at 807 Fourth Street, 1st Ward, City of Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 5, 1900, shows Glen D. Fletcher (age 45) born June 1854 in Minnesota to Vermont and Massachusetts-born parents and having been married for 8 years is a married Lodger and is living in the Henry Reichert household, 663 South Street, 6th Ward, City of Oakland, Alameda Co., CA.

Dorothy Virginia Chapman was born about 1902 in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX.


Historical Review of South-east Texas and the Founders, Leaders and Representative Men of Its Commerce, Industry and Civic Affairs, Volume 2, Dermot H. Hardy and Ingham S. Roberts, Brookhaven Press, 1910

WILLOUGHBY J. CHAPMAN was born in Devonshire, England, December 23, 1860. His father, Alfred Chapman, came from Devonshire to the United States in 1879, and was a merchant in Missouri until his death in 1900. The mother, whose maiden name was Bessie M. Dufty, of Devonshire, is now living in Ohio. After an education in the boarding schools of England and the public schools of Missouri, W. J. Chapman began working for Wells, Fargo & Company, and was employed at different places in the West from 1883 to 1897. While in the employ of the express company he located at Galveston, in 1888, and has been a resident of the city since that time. He resigned his work with the express company in 1897 and became manager of the Gulf Fisheries Company. In January, 1905, he established the Bettison Fishing Pier Company. The pier was destroyed in the storm of July 21, 1909. Mr. Chapman is president of the W. J. Chapman Company, dealers in fish and oysters. This is a wholesale business, and was founded in 1905. The principal localities supplied by this company are in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Arkansas. Mr. Chapman is a member of the Galveston Business League. His politics is Republican, and he is a member of the Episcopal church. He is a trustee of the Galveston Lodge, no. 126, B. P. O. E. His marriage to Miss Fannie Waters, daughter of Co. O. P. Waters, of Burlington, Iowa, occurred in 1891. They have one child, Dorothy Virginia.


The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 25, 1910, shown Willoughby J. Chapman (age 49) born in England to English parents and emigrating in 1871 is a dealer in fish and oysters living at 3504 Avenue O, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Living with him is his wife of 14 years, Francis Chapman (age 44) born in Iowa to New York and Georgia-born parents, who has one child of the three born to her still living. Also there is his daughter, Dorothy V. Chapman (age 7) born in Texas to England and Iowa-born parents.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 19, 1910, shows Ella Fletcher (age 53) born in Minnesota is a childless and widowed Head of Household and is living at 314 Bunker Hill Street, City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA. Living with her are her two unmarried and unemployed siblings, both born in Minnesota to Vermont-born parents: Eve Fletcher (age 59); and Glenn D. Fletcher (age 55).

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on May 4, 1910, shows Charles L. Warfield (age 58) born in Iowa to Maryland and Ohio-born parents and in his second marriage is a Broker of Realty and Mines who owns his home with a mortgage and is living at 1030 15th Street, 4th Ward, City of San Diego, San Diego Co., CA. Living with him are: his wife of 23 years, Grace Warfield (age 51) born in Massachusetts to Vermont-born parents who is in her first marriage with1 of the 2 children born to her still alive; and his unmarried son, Carlton K. Warfield (age 18) born in Iowa to Iowa and Massachusetts-born parents, a Machinist at a Automobile Company. Also living there: his unmarried sister-n-law, Eve Fletcher (age 60) born in Minnesota to Vermont-born parents, who has her Own Income; and his divorced and unemployed brother-in-law, Glenn D. Fletcher (age 56) born in Iowa to Vermont-born parents,

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 16, 1910, shows Geo. M. Bickett (age 57) born in Ohio to Ohio-born parents is a plumber in a shop married for 35 years living in his own home at 242 South Chestnut Street, Xenia, Xenia Twp., Greene Co., OH. Living with him is his wife Ruth E. Bickett (age 56) born in Ohio to New York-born parents, with 5 of her 6 children still alive. Also living at home are all five of the living children, all unmarried and born in Ohio: Arnold R. Bickett (age 34) and not employed and can not read or write; Maud F. Bickett (age 32) and not employed; LeRoy M. Bickett (age 26) is a employed in tire repairing in a shop; Earl M. Bickett (age 24) and not employed; and Agnes Bickett (age 21) who is a school teacher in a public school.

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 25, 1910, shows Samuel Coolway (age 65) born in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1869 and a Naturalized citizen is a Carpenter Contractor renting his home at 99 West Locust Street, 2nd Ward, City of Newark, Newark Twp., Licking Co., OH. Living with him is his second wife, of four years, Rose Chapman (age 47) born in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1871, and is her first marriage. Also living there is his widowed mother-in-law, Bessie M. Chapman (age 73) born in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1871, with 5 of the 8 children born to her still living; his widowed sister-in-law, Anna D. Burch (age 42) born in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1871, with 2 of the 3 children born to her still living, who is a Books Sales Lady; his niece, Bernice D. Burch (age 9) born in Montana to United States and English-born parents; his widowed sister-in-law, Bessie M. Carothers (age 35) born in Missouri to English-born parents, with both of the children born to her still alive; and his niece, Francis H. Carothers (age 8) born in Illinois to Missouri-born parents.

Mary Ann (Kline) Gordon died July 31, 1911, in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA, at age 81.


The Muscatine Journal, Muscatine, IA, Tuesday, August 1, 1911

AGED RESIDENT IS CALLED IN DEATH

MRS. MARY ANN GORDON DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS.

Widow of General Gordon and Resident of Muscatine for Sixty Years Is Dead.

A resident of this city for more than half a century, Mrs. Mary Ann Gordon, widow of General J. G. Gordon, succumbed at the home of J. Linn Hoopes, on West Third street, late yesterday afternoon, attaining the age of 81 years. General Gordon at one time was a resident of this city, having been one of its most successful dry goods merchants. Mrs. Gordon had been in ill health for the last several years. She was born in Magnolia, Fla., in 1830, her father, E. Kline, once being mayor of Muscatine. From Magnolia she removed to St. Louis with her parents, making her home there until 1851, when she came to this city, residing here continuously for the past sixty years.


In 1869, General John Gardner Gordon owned a hardware and dry goods store.


The Daily Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Tuesday, February 11, 1913

Miss Agnes Bickett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Bickett, of Chestnut street, has taken a position as traveling representative of George E. Dum and Company, selling a Practical reference Library, and started on her new work Tuesday morning. She went first to New Philadelphia, where she joined a party of young women with whom she will be associated in the work. She expects to travel over a number of States and Canada.


Francis Williams "Fannie" (Waters) (Thompson) (Fletcher) Chapman died September 23, 1917, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, at age 62. Buried in Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX.


Francis Williams "Fannie" (Waters) (Thompson) (Fletcher) Chapman Death Record.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Tuesday, September 25, 1917

Mortuary Record

WOMAN CIVIC WORKER IS DEAD

Mrs. Fannie W. Chapman Was Prominent in Social Life.

The funeral of Mrs. Fannie W. Chapman, wife of Willoughby J. Chapman, who died at 11 o'clock Sunday night at the family residence, 1718 Avenue G, was held yesterday afternoon at the home. Mrs. Chapman was a descendant of the old Everett family of Georgia, but was born in Muscatine, Iowa. Mrs. Chapman came to Galveston in 1889, and the following year married W. J. Chapman, a business man of this city. She was prominently connected with the social life of this city, having taken an active part in the work of the Women's Health Protective Association, and was a devout worker in the Episcopal Church as a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church here. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the residence, Rev. George B. Norton, formerly pastor of St. Mark's Episcopal Church of Beaumont, officiating. George M. Murray, Bonneau Murray, W. E. Grover, E. J. Pettibone, V. L. Bautard and H. T. Adriance were pallbearers. Interment was in the Episcopal Cemetery.


Willoughby Joseph Chapman and Dora Agnes Bickett were married July 15, 1918, at the home of the officiating clergyman, the Rev. D. D. Dodds, on East Market street, Xenia, Greene Co., OH.


Marriage License - Willoughby  J. Chapman, 45, Galveston, Texas, a merchant, and D. Agness Bickett, 30, bookkeeper. Rev. D. D. Dodds.


The Evening Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Tuesday, July 16, 1918

Local Items

Marriage License - Willoughby  J. Chapman, 45, Galveston, Texas, a merchant, and D. Agness Bickett, 30, bookkeeper. Rev. D. D. Dodds.


The Evening Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Tuesday, July 16, 1918

MISS AGNES BICKETT WEDS A TEXAS MAN

Miss D. Agnes Bickett, daughter of Mrs. George Bickett of Yellow Springs, became the bride of Willoughby J. Chapman of Galveston, Texas, Monday, the quiet service taking place at the home of the officiating clergyman, the Rev. D. D. Dodds, on East Market street. The bridal pair was unattended. The bride wore a tailored suit in taupe. Following the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Chapman started for Cleveland, and they will visit Mr. Chapman's mother and sisters in that city and Akron. They expect to be in Yellow Springs for a short visit before going to their home in Galveston. Mr. Chapman, who is an Englishman by birth, is a wholesale grocer and dealer in ship supplies at Galveston. Mrs. Chapman has been in Milwaukee for the past year, having been engaged there as bookkeeper for The Petley Rubber Manufacturing Company. She came home two weeks ago to prepare for her marriage.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Tuesday, June 17, 1919

Social News

Mrs. Ruth Bickett who has been visiting  her daughter, Mrs. Willoughby Chapman, 1718 Avenue G, will return today to her home at Yellow Springs, Ohio. Mrs. Chapman, Miss Dorothy Chapman, and little Miss Jean Elizabeth Chapman will accompany her and will spend the summer at Yellow Springs and Akron, Ohio, where they will visit Mr. Chapman's sisters, Mr. Chapman will join them later to accompany them home.


The Xenia Evening Gazette, Xenia, Greene Co., OH, Tuesday, September 2, 1919

YELLOW SPRINGS

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Chapman and daughters, Dorothy and Jean Elizabeth, left Thursday for their home in Galvaston, Texas, after spending the summer with Mrs. Chapman's mother, Mrs. George Bickett.


The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 7, 1920, shows W. J. Chapman (age 59) born in England to English-born parents and a Naturalized citizen is the Manager of Gulf Fishering living in the City of Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Living with him is his wife, Agnes Chapman (age 32) born in Ohio to Ohio-born parents.  Also living there is W. J. Chapman's unmarried daughter, Dorothy Chapman (age 17) born in Texas to England and Ohio-born parents. Also living there is W. J. Chapman's daughter, Jean Chapman (age 9/12) born in Texas to Texas and Ohio-born parents. There is also a servant living in the household.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 2, 1920, shows Grace F. Warfield (age 60) born in Massachusetts to Vermont-born parents is a widow who owns her home with a mortgage and is living at 1030 15th Street, City of San Diego, San Diego Twp., San Diego Co., CA. Living with her are: her unmarried son, Carlton K. Warfield (age 28) born in Iowa to Iowa and Massachusetts-born parents, an Automobile Mechanic;  unmarried sister, Eve Fletcher (age 69) born in Minnesota to Vermont-born parents; her divorced and unmarried brother, Glenn D. Fletcher (age 65) born in Iowa to Vermont-born parents; her divorced and unmarried brother, William K. Fletcher (age 59) born in Iowa to Vermont-born parents; and a widowed Boarder, Hannah H. Hockman (age 78) born in Ohio to Maine and Ohio-born parents.

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 14, 1920, shows Rose Woolway (age 57) born in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1870 and Naturalized in 1875 is a widowed head of household living on Sharon Center Route 2, Sharon Twp., Medina Co., OH. Living with her is her widowed mother, Bessie M. Chapman (age 83) born in England to English-born parents and having emigrated in 1870 and Naturalized in 1875. Also living there is her unmarried niece, Bernice D. Meek (age 19) born in Montana to English and Illinois-born parents.

Glen Deshler Fletcher died May 22, 1920, at 1030 Fifteenth Street, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA, at age 65. Buried in Greenwood Memorial Park and Mortuary, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA.


The San Diego Union, San Diego, San Diego Co., CA, Sunday, May 23, 1920

DEATHS

FLETCHER - At 1030 Fifteenth street, this city, May 22, 1920, Glen Deshler Fletcher: a native of Minnesota, aged 65 years. Strictly private funeral services will be held at the chapel of Johnson-Saum company tomorrow (Monday), Rev. Charles L. Barnes officiating. Interment at Greenwood cemetery. Please omit flowers.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Friday, July 2, 1920

Social News

Mr. and Mrs. Willoughby J. Chapman and Baby Jean Elizabeth left yesterday for Yellow Springs, Ohio, to visit Mrs. Chapman's mother and sisters at Akron, Ohio. Mrs. Chapman and baby will spend the summer months with Mrs. Bickett at Yellow Springs, Mr. Chapman returning home the latter part of July after attending to some business matters.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Sunday, September 25, 1921

CHAPMAN BUYS BUILDING USED AS SHIP CHANDLERY

W. J. Chapman has purchased from T. L. Cross the three-story building at 2014-16 Strand, occupied by Mr. Chapman's ship chandlery business, it was announced yesterday. The consideration was $12,000. The building, known as the Hendley building, has been used as a ship chandler's store continuously for the past thirty-seven years. Mr. Chapman has been in business there for five years.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Thursday, November 2, 1922

Social News

Willoughby J. Chapman returned yesterday from an extended trip to New York, Akron, Springfield and Yellow Springs. Mrs. Chapman and children, Jean Elizabeth and Robert Alfred, will remain for a longer visit with Mr. Chapman's mother in Yellow Springs.


Willoughby Joseph Chapman died January 28, 1926, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, at age 65. Buried in Galveston Memorial Park, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX.


Willoughby Joseph Chapman Death Record. Cause of Death: Chronic Myocarditis of 8 months.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Friday, January 29, 1926

Chandler Dies

WILLOUGHBY J. CHAPMAN, ship chandler, died yesterday evening at 6 o'clock at his home, 2124 Avenue N. Death came suddenly and was attributed to heart failure. Mr. Chapman was prominent in shipping circles and was conducting a ship chandlery and manufacturer's agent business at the time of his death. He was also owner of Bettison's fishing pier. He was 66 years old and had resided in this city for the greater part of his life. Born in Devonshire, England, Mr. Chapman came to America as a youth and resided for some time in Missouri. He came to Galveston more than fifty-three years ago. When the Wells Fargo Express Company opened its first office here in 1888, Mr. Chapman was appointed agent. Until recently he was receiver of the Gulf Fisheries. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Agnes B. Chapmen; two small children, Jean and Bobby; one brother, A. D. Chapman of Ridgefield Park, N. J., and three sisters, Mrs. Rose Woolwny, Mrs. D. M. Carothers and Mrs. Anna Meek, all of Akron, Ohio. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Wednesday, February 3, 1926

SHIP CHANDLERY BUSINESS AND FISHING PIER WILL BE CONTINUED AS HERETOFORE

The business of W. J. Chapman, ship chandler, who died last week, will be continued as in the past, according to information given out yesterday by Mrs. Chapman. As the business demands additional lines and help will be added to the force, she said. Bettison's fishing pier will also be continued as formerly, with all concessions being handled by the one company, Mrs. Chapman said. Old Black Joe, who has been at the pier for a number of years, will continue to hold down his same position.


The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 9, 1930, shows Agnes B. Chapman (age 50) born in Ohio to Ohio-born parents is a widow owning her own home valued at $6,000 is the Operating Manager of a Fishing Pier and is living at 1314 24th Street, City of Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Living with her are her two children, both born in Texas to England and Ohio-born parents: Jean E. Chapman (age 10); and Robert A. Chapman (age 7). Also living there is Agnes Bickett's unmarried and unemployed brother; Earl Bickett (age 44) born in Ohio to Ohio-born parents.


Dora Agnes (Bickett) Chapman

Robert A. Chapman, Dora Agnes (Bickett) Chapman, Jean E. Chapman, taken for an article in The Galveston Daily News, Friday, March 17, 1939.

Rear: Unknown, Dora Agnes (Bickett) Chapman, Unknown; Front: Bobby Chapman, Jean Chapman

Rear: Unknown, Unknown, Unknown, Dora Agnes (Bickett) Chapman, Unknown; Front: Unknown, Jean Chapman, Bobby Chapman. Picture probably taken at Galveston Beach, TX, about 1930?


Galveston Coastal News, Friday, June 25, 1937: To the right are a group of visitors from Wisconsin, who have been spending the week here as the guests of Mrs. W. J. Chapman and daughter, Miss Jean Chapman. Miss Ruth Bickett, standing, and Miss Helen Bickett, seated on the top step, are the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Bickett of Watertown, Wis., and the nieces of Mrs. Chapman. They were accompanied by Miss Doris Kaddatz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Kaddatz, of Watertown, who is seated on the lowest step. Miss Chapman who is pictured with the group will accompany them when they leave. They will spend a few days in New Orleans before returning home.


The 1940 U. S. Census taken on April 23, 1940, shows Agnes B. Chapman (age 51) born in Ohio, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 2 years of College, is a widowed Owner and Operator of a Fishing Pier who owns her home worth $6,000 and is living at 1314 24th Street, 9th Ward, City of Galveston, Galveston Co., TX. Living with her are: her unmarried daughter, Jean Chapman (age 20) born in Texas, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 4 years of High School; her unmarried son, Robert Chapman (age 17) born in Texas, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 4 years of High School; and her unmarried brother, Earl Bickett (age 54) born in Ohio, and 5 years ago was living in the Same House, and with 5 years of School.

Dora Agnes (Bickett) Chapman died May 15, 1954, in Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, at age 65. Buried in Galveston Memorial Park, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX.


Dora Agnes (Bickett) Chapman Death Record. Primary Cause of Death: Cerebral Vascular (Stroke) due to an Accident of 3 days and also due to Essential Hypertension of Unknown Duration.


The Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Galveston Co., TX, Monday, May 17, 1954

Rites Set Today For Mrs. Chapman

Services for Mrs. Agnes B. Chapman, 65, who died at Schneider's Nursing Home at 1103 29th street early Saturday, are scheduled at 4 p. m. Monday at Malloy & Sons funeral home. The Rev. Garnet House, Central Methodist Church pastor, will officiate. Mrs. Chapman, widow of the late Willoby J. Chapman, was for many years owner and operator of the Bettison fishing pier. She was a Galveston resident 36 years. Surviving are: a daughter and son, Mrs. Harvey Bashor and Robert A. Chapman, Galveston; brother, L. M. Bickett of Watertown, Wisc., six grandchildren and other relatives. Burial will be in Galveston Memorial Park. Pallbearers: A. J. Bisaillon, W. H. White, Jeff Huddleston, W.. E. Greer, Harry Melcer and W. M. Smith.


Robert Chapman and Unknown (possibly Edwin Zubke). Picture taken at the Le-Ki-Re Ranch in 1953/1954.

The Le-Ki-Re Ranch Feed Mill truck when it was new. Left to Right: Tobe Bashor, John Chapman, Mickey Bashor and Paul Chapman. Picture taken in Watertown, WI.

John Chapman, 1953, Watertown, WI

Anne Chapman and Robert Chapman, 1954, Watertown, WI

The house as it looked when the Chapmans and the Bashors rented it from 1953 to 1954, located at 749 N. Church St., Watertown, Dodge Co., WI. 

The house as it looked during demolition in December, 2006, located at 749 N. Church St., Watertown, Dodge Co., WI. 

The original Schurz home was built by Carl Schurz in the 1850s on a hill overlooking the Rock River. It was located off of North Church Street on the property of the recently-sold Karlshuegel Bed and Breakfast, 749 N. Church St. The hill on which Schurz built his home was known as Karlshuegel which was German for Carl's Hill. That's why the bed and breakfast, when owned by Cy and Judy Quam, used that name. 

The original home was an elaborate mansion with a great deal of fretwork around the porch roof which spanned the front and side of the house. It gave the home a distinctive, lacy look. Schurz used his home for many social gatherings and it remained standing until 1915 when it was destroyed by fire. The property on which the home was located was bordered by an old spur line of the old Chicago and North Western tracks (now Union Pacific) which crossed Silver Creek skating pond and then traveled south nearly to Cady Street.

Watertown's Most Famous Couple 

Although Carl and Margarethe Schurz lived in Watertown for only a brief time, they are considered one of that city's more famous couples. "Carl Schurz of Wisconsin" soon became a nationally known liberal statesman, publicist and journalist. 

The Schurz's immigrated from Germany during the political upheaval there and arrived in New York in 1852. In order to begin in­creasing the state population, the Wisconsin Legislature sent a "Com­missioner of Emigration" to New York to get the "foreigners" in­terested in settling in the newly created State of Wisconsin. Carl Schurz was among those Germans interested in looking over the land. His first trip to Watertown was in the fall of 1854. He was soon writing back to Margarethe to see how she felt about moving west. He soon bought some property outside of Watertown (Schurz foresaw that Watertown would one day be a potential rail center and would thus greatly increase the city's population) which he named Karlshuegel or "Carl's Hill". The Schurzes finally settled in Watertown during the summer of 1856. Shortly after their arrival, Margarethe, who was a trained Kindergarten teacher, founded the first such school in America. Today this little one-story frame building has been faithfully restored and rests on the Octagon House grounds and serves as a fitting memorial to her efforts. Margarethe died in 1876 at the age of 43. She was survived by her husband; two daughters Agatha and Marianna; and two sons, Carl and Herbert. 

Carl Schurz, always an energetic, ambitious and politically active man, served as U. S. Minister to Spain (1861); served in the Civil War until the end; was elected to the U. S. Senate from his adopted State of Missouri (1869 to 1875); and was Secretary of the Interior (1877 to 1881) under President Hayes. He died in New York City in 1906. 

Plans in 1991 by Cy and Judy Quam to turn the Sweeney home at 749 N. Church St. into a bed and breakfast lodging operation brought back memories of the history of that property for local history buffs. That home is located on the land where Carl Schurz built his home back over a century ago. Schurz was one of the most distinguished of all Watertown 48ers. He came to a booming Watertown in 1853 and saw a grand future for the city.

He bought a farm of 89 acres on the northwest side of the city and built a huge German villa-type house, complete with gingerbread trim. His plans were to pay off the $8,500 mortgage by selling lots as the rapidly growing city expanded. Unfortunately, the depression of 1857 put an end to his hopes and it took him years to repay the debts.

It was back in 1915 that the home, at the time occupied by the Donahue family, burned to the ground. Jerome Donahue was a youngster back in 1915 when it burned.

His recollections were that the fire started about midnight when he and his whole family were sleeping. No one was hurt in the fire, but the home was completely destroyed. He said the family members had only the clothes on their backs when they found shelter from nearby neighbors. He said, "I can remember it was cold out, that we all had nightshirts on. That's what we wore in them days."

Jerome said he could remember the fire department had to pump water from a hydrant at the Fifth Ward Tavern. That was the closest one. He said, "My dad's brother (Jim Donahue) was there that night. There was a stove in the living room and my mother started a fire so there would be heat in that room. That's where he slept." In the house that night, in addition to Jerome and Jim were Jerome's brother Jim and his sisters, Constance, Loretta, Frances and Catherine. The family rented the house, and Jerome believes they lived there about six years before the fire. The family received many donations from friends in the community and relocated to a home on North Washington Street, later owned by Bill and Abby Potter.

After the new house was built, it was eventually known as the Pratt residence in the early 1950s, although they did not live there year round. Eventually it became the Baum residence, the Sweeney residence, the Coughlin residence, and the Quam residence. It became the Walsh residence, and was then purchased by a developer in December 2006 and the house demolished.


Watertown Daily Times, Watertown, WI, Thursday, December 7, 2006

Historic property will get new use

A long-standing home on Carl Schurz Hill is razed Wednesday to make room for a planned condominium development on the site off North Church Street. Built around 1920 by the Pratt family, the building rests on the original foundation of a home constructed by German statesman Carl Schurz. The Schurz home, which was destroyed by fire in 1912, was also the site where Margarethe Schurz began the first kindergarten iin America before relocating to a downtown building. The Sweeney family raised their large family in the home for 38 years before the property was converted to a bed and breakfast business, The Karlshuegel Inn, in 1992. Developer Mike Martin plans to build 16 custom-built condominium dupleses on the 7 1/2 acres of land which overlook a back bay  of the Rock River.


Unidentified relatives; picture supplied by Anne (Chapman) Merillat


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dorothy Anne Conn

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dorothy Anne Conn was born on April 20, 1931, in Beaumont, Texas, to Dorothy Francis Chapman Stafford and Olander Edward Stafford. The Stafford family later moved to Waxahachie, the hometown of her mother, growing up surrounded by her numerous Chapman cousins, aunts, and uncles. Dorothy Anne attended Southern Methodist University. In 1951, she married her childhood friend, Carroll Wayne C.W. Conn, Jr. C.W. and Dorothy Anne made their life in Beaumont, building and expanding Conn Appliances, and raising their three beloved daughters, Carolyn, Susan, and Elizabeth. Travel, education, and the arts all played major roles in the lives of Dorothy Anne and C.W. Dorothy Anne was a true artist and creative spirit. She worked in sculpture, printmaking, drawing, painting, and any medium she found interesting. Her great inspiration was at the beach, and her daughters fondly remember her working with plaster in bas relief with shells, sketching driftwood in pen and ink, among many other projects. When the girls were older, the happy couple really began to travel extensively. Dorothy Anne's special memories of this time include many trips with their family and friends, visiting numerous countries. She will also be remembered as gardener, gourmet cook, seamstress/ costume designer, bridge player, voracious reader and community theater enthusiast. Dorothy Anne had a great sense of humor, a sharp wit, and was blessed to have a diverse circle of dear and talented close friends. Her heart's delight and what she considered her greatest achievement was her family. She was a dedicated and supportive wife, and served as the best friend and source of strength for her husband, C.W. Throughout the years, while her husband was pursuing various business interests, Dorothy Anne served as his touchstone and true north, and he readily acknowledged that his many accomplishments would not have been possible without his partner, Dorothy Anne. She was a loving mother, nurturing and supporting her three girls throughout their lives. For each girl, Dorothy Anne was a source of strength and inspiration, serving as their biggest fan. Her grandchildren were her greatest joy and she loved every moment she had watching them grow and encouraging them to experience all that life has to offer. Dorothy Anne was a member of the Magnolia Garden Club, The Junior League of Beaumont, Lamar Friends of the Arts. Along with other talented ladies, she lovingly needle pointed the altar kneelers at Trinity United Methodist Church, where she was a longtime member. She was appointed as a board member to the Texas Commission on the Arts by Governor Ann Richards in 1992, and also served as the president of the board of trustees at the Art Museum of Southeast Texas. Dorothy Anne was also appointed to the Kennedy Center for the Arts. In later years, she was instrumental in starting a program for early stage Alzheimer's/Dementia patients and their caregivers called the Morning Out Club at Trinity United Methodist Church. The family is most grateful to her most loyal and loving caregivers, Dorothy Achan, Linda Patterson, Doris Martin, and Edna Morris, who are our heroes and friends. She is preceded in death by her parents, Dorothy and Olander Stafford; and her husband of fifty-three years, Carroll Wayne Conn, Jr. Survivors include her daughters, Carolyn Fertitta and her husband, Mark; Susan McCurry and her husband, Roger; and Elizabeth Waddill and her husband, Russ; grandchildren, Katy and Michael Fertitta, Steven and Camille Clark, and Thomas and Sarah Waddill. A gathering of Mrs. Conn's family and friends will be from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m., Friday, July 6, 2012, at Broussard's, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont. Her funeral service will be 11:00 a.m., Saturday, July 7, 2012, at Trinity United Methodist Church, 3430 Harrison Avenue, followed by a private family committal. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in her honor to Trinity United Methodist Church, 3430 Harrison Avenue, Beaumont, Texas 77706; Some Other Place, P.O. Box 843, Beaumont, Texas 77704; or The Art Museum of Southeast Texas, P.O. Box 3703, Beaumont, Texas 77704. Complete and updated information may be found at: broussards1889.com.

 


Published in The Beaumont Enterprise on July 6, 2012

 

 

http://www.ftfmagazine.lewcock.net/index.php/volume-one-new/january-2008/340-alfred-chapman-escapes

 

 

Alfred Chapman escapes

Working my way back through my husband’s family I reached his maternal great grandfather, John Chapman. He had lived in Black Torrington in North Devon, amongst a cluster of other Chapmans and had died before the 1841 census. There was no distinguishing middle name – nothing to single him out in the IGI records. It was clear that I was wasting my time trying to get anywhere with his records. I set him aside as an impenetrable 'brick wall' and turned my attention to other parts of the family who looked more promising.
 
By the time she died, just before Christmas of 2005, my mother-in-law had long since ceased to be able to share her family history with us, but there were bits and pieces I had noted in the past, when the topic of conversation had wandered into family tree territory. When the time came to start the house clearing process, various nuggets turned up – some a real delight, even when they didn’t contribute much to the tree. There were wedding and funeral orders of service, invitations and birth announcements, a probate copy of a will from 1869, an original wedding certificate from 1883 and original baptism certificates from the years just after, along with Band of Hope and Women’s Temperance Movement certificates and a family bible, as well as some old letters
 
It was correspondence dating from the very beginning of the 20th century which provided the means to break down the brick wall.
 
Two pairs of letters – two inbound and two copies of the replies – between Arthur Willoughby Chapman of Plymouth (grandson of that John Chapman) and Willoughby J. Chapman of Galveston, Texas.
 
At that time, Arthur was only about 18 years old – a very junior member of the family shipping company in Plymouth, but in an era of when people did not use first names, his name had appeared in full on a document (perhaps a letter of credit?) which had landed on the desk of a clerk in a real estate agents in Galveston.
 
Furthermore, in that era when everyone was Mr this and Mrs that, that clerk happened to know that the 'W. J.' of 'Mr W. J. Chapman, manager, Gulf Fisheries Inc.' stood for 'Willoughby J., and he also knew that Mr Chapman‘s family came from Devon, whence also came the document on his desk. He had been intrigued enough to put the two men in touch with each other. The correspondence was packed full of the detail you’d have to exchange to work out how you were related, and they were indeed related.
 
It was fascinating and it gave me lots of extra detail about the family, including names and anecdotes. It gave me a brief, but first hand account of the great storm of Galveston, in which W. J. Chapman and his wife had lost everything but their lives and counted themselves very lucky for surviving. It also gave an account of the rebuilding of Galveston and the new sea wall to protect it. I was reading these letters shortly after the inundation of New Orleans in August 2005, so that had quite a resonance. 
 
Although this didn’t really get me much further on with John Chapman himself.
 
It occurred to me that someone in the USA called 'Willoughby J. Chapman' was likely to be researched by someone else, because it was that sort of a name. So I did some googling. A couple of e-addresses turned up in the process and I tried e-mailing them, explaining what we’d found. One recipient turned out to be a granddaughter of Willoughby J. Chapman, just as my husband is a grandson of Arthur Willoughby Chapman. She has been enormously generous with her family tree resources. 
 
Perhaps because they were emigrés, her ancestors had made and kept wonderful family tree records. Her great grandfather had written an essay which commenced -
 
"It may perhaps be interesting to learn something of the history and genealogy of our family. I will begin with my grandfather Joseph Chapman of Black Torrington, Devon, England".
 
It went on to encompass enough information to take me three generations further back and several branches sideways. My brick wall was comprehensively demolished!
 
Rather more important than that demolition, is that I have gained an e-friend. In response to a set of images of that set of letters, she posted me a fat A4 envelope of copy records and e-mailed me transcripts and images.
 
Amongst the bundles of information was a copy of W. J. Chapman’s father, Alfred’s diary. It covered the dates from 1 January 1869, as a tenant farmer in North Devon, through his emigration journey, to 4 May 1871, by which time his family had joined him via New York. It records the weather conditions every day and tells of his day-to-day experiences. It mentions the doctor calling to vaccinate two of his daughters (one only two months old) in 1869, when vaccination was pretty much cutting edge medicine; it talks of his difficulties with his landlord; it describes his journey from North Devon to Bristol and his crossing to Boston; it describes his experiences travelling through the US, looking for somewhere to settle – to live and to work and to which he could bring out his family.
 
There are cameo experiences such as glimpsing someone whom he believes to be the president, travelling incognito with his wife; there’s the false hope that he’s bought a goldmine; remarks about the similarities and differences of the countryside, the people, the animals, the crops, even the churches, as well as passing remarks which show most graphically just how much travel has changed such as "Good work, 20 miles in 2 1/2 hours”.
 
One 1871 entry in the diary grabbed my attention in a different way, Bessie being his wife -
 
“February 25th Saturday - J.S. went to P.Office. Posted letter to Bessie, No.13, & received newspaper Western Times with 2 letters from me to Bessie. I am much hurt at their being published without my consent as there are some things ought not to be published and others are misprinted & misrepresented.”
 
I thought to myself, I don’t live that far from the British Newspaper Library at Colindale so I could go and see if I could find the copy of that newspaper in which Alfred’s letters were published. It took me a while to get organised, but I did establish using their online catalogue, that they had the copies covering the relevant time span; 4 October 1870, when he’d landed in Boston and 25 February 1871, when he’d collected the infamous papers from the post office, allowing for a margin of time for letters to have been written and to travel to and fro. Eventually I got myself to Colindale, armed with a spare morning in which to enjoy myself investigating.
 
I called for the first volumes of papers and realised that it was probably going to take a little while. The newspapers were made up of a couple of folded sheets about A1 in size – so about A2 to deal with. It was a daily weekday paper, so there would be quite a lot to wade through.
 
I started browsing: looking for the correspondence pages, for the local news columns and skim-reading for references to Chapman. I began to realise that I would be getting copies of pages from more than just the one paper, when I did find them. Alfred Chapman had been a cause célèbre in this (Liberal) newspaper. The descriptions of his difficulties with the landlord clearly understated his problems. He’d ended up going to court to protect his position as tenant farmer, having had his tenancy terminated rather abruptly (almost certainly because his political views and non-conformist churchmanship conflicted with his landlord’s opinions). He was always going to find it difficult because his landlord was Lord High Sheriff of Devon, a practising barrister, an MP and the son of the Archdeacon of Exeter.
 
Alfred himself, referred to “the position he occupies as a magistrate, as a Captain in the Yeomanry, as a practical farmer, and as a so-called leader (being chairman of the committee) of the Conservative Party in North Devon”.
 
Due to the landlord reneging on an unwritten agreement, he found that winning his original case was no advantage because his landlord won another which meant Alfred was down by a couple of hundred pounds, which was a lot of money in those days.
 
The newspaper championed his cause as a tenant farmer trying to protect the interests of all tenant farmers.
 
There were several leader articles, some other letters from Alfred, some directly to the paper and records of the efforts to raise money to send with his wife, when the rest of the family followed after him. * see Related Articles below *
 
My 'spare morning' lasted most of the day! However it was so interesting and was very satisfying to feel that I could send my e-friend something which I knew would bring her so much pleasure.
 

Christine from Herts

 

 

Birth:  Feb. 16, 1810
Baltimore City
Maryland, USA
Death:  Jan. 4, 1877
Muscatine
Muscatine County
Iowa, USA

He married (1) Sarah Reinhard in 1836 Ky and (2) Mary Ann Klein. John was the son of John Gordon from Carlisle Pa - who died in Md 1818 and wife Maria Gardner. He was orphaned at the age of 8 years.

Also, from a book entitled "Our Gordon Family", by Spencer Gordon, 1941, General Gordon's second
wife was Elizabeth Dougherty, nee Klein. His children by Sarah Reinhard were Ella Blake, Susan Baker, Mary Edwards, Maria, John Gardner 11, and Annie. By his second marriage with Elizabeth Dougherty, he had a son named Glenn.


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Obituary--
General John G Gordon no More - A Brief Sketch of an Honorable and Useful Life

For several days the community has been expecting, with painful and anxious hears, the dread news of the death of John G Gordon. At 2 O'clock this morning the end came, and the spirit of the beloved husband and father, the honored citizen and esteemed friend, crossed the dark flood, to mingle with the Celestial band on the other shore. Surrounded by weeping wife and children, sweetly, peacefully, like a child hushed to gentle slumber, and unconscious of the physical pain too often inflicted by the arrows of Death, he sank to rest, only the still pulse and marble like features indicating the great transition from time to eternity.
"So fades the summer cloud away, so sinks the gale when storms ale o'er, So gently shuts the eye of day, So dies the wave upon the shore"
Thus passed away on of Muscatine's oldest and most esteemed citizens - one whose form and face and pleasant voice and kind greeting were familiar to the youg and old of the city. It will be remembered that the cause of his death was a paralytic affection. Until this sudden and unexpected attack he had been remarkably free from disease, never before having in his recollection, been ill a day , ad never, particularly speaking, having taken medicine. The attack which loosed "the silver chord" of life came on Saturday evening, December 16, two weeks ago last Saturday. It was about 7 o'clock and Mr Gordon was in the store, standing by the counter, listening to the reading of the evening paper by his associate, Eugene Klein, when he experienced a singularly painful sensation, and on the impulse of the moment, started towards the door. It was noticed by Eugene that one leg seemed to drag heavily, and that it seemed to be a painful effort to walk. On reading a point about half way between the stove and the front door, the General Stopped and leaned over the counter, evidently in distress. In reply to the tender inquiries of Eugene he remarked that he felt very strangely. Eugene and Mr Hunt, the head clerk, at once assisted him home. He then left the store, never to return. For a day or two he was able to move about the house, and hopes of his recovery were entertained, but his strength gradually failed and he was soon compelled to keep his bed. During the last week or ten days of his illness, the General was only conscious at intervals, the trouble having, it seemed more seriously affected the brain. It is believed that the attack was superinduced by a severe fall received on the steps of his house last spring. We can give here only a brief sketch of the eventful life of this well know and loved citizen. He was born in Baltimore MD, February 16, 1810, his age being nearly 67 years. At an early age he was sent to York, Pa, to serve an apprenticing for the mercantile business. When a young man he removed to Louisville, Ky and there embarked in business for himself. After a short but very successful career here, he transferred his headquarters to Pittsburgh, Pa and such was the popularity he had gained at Louisville that he carried with him in his new house a large part of his old custom. In the spring of 1844, following the tide of emigration and the course of the empire, he came west and located in Muscatine, commencing business as a general merchant. His first stand was an old frame standing on the site of the brick now occupied by McQuesten and Sawyer, his next a similar structure standing where Mr Gerndt has his meat market, next to Daugherty's drug store. He occupied this land till 1851, when he completed and moved into handsome brick block which is so well know as the store of J G Gordon & Co. During all those busy years his has been controlling spirit in the store. For eight years from 1866-1874 O P Waters, Esq, was a partner, and for several years before and ever since Eugene Klein, his brother in law, was associated with him in the business, but the General has ever taken a pride in giving his personal attention to its super vision, and the customer who entered the store without being greeted by the General himself with a hearty salutation, a cheery word, a bright smile and a cordial hand shake would have felt as if something was wrong. In his business relations, the General ranks with hie pioneers of the city and the best know and most prominent and influent ion in the State. In earlier times, when dry good, groceries, hardware and greenware were combined, his trade commanded sweep of country taking in radius of from 100 to 140 miles and his large establishment was known as one of the finest and most extensive in the west. His popularity as a merchant was commensurate with the extent of his trade. Every one liked to deal with one who was at once so courteous obliging and straightforward in his commerce with all. General Gordon was twice married - first at Louisville to miss Sarah Beinard, who bore him six children (five daughters and one son) and second in 1856, in Muscatine, to the widow of James M Daugherty, and daughter of Edward Klein, by whom he had one son and one daughter. All his children are living, ? the daughter by his second marriage. His surviving daughters are Ella, wife of Wm R Stone, and Mary, wife of Col J F Culver, both of Duluth, Minn; Susan, wife of W S Humphreys, of St. Louis; Maria, wife of M W Griffin,of Muscatine, and Miss Annie, at home; Gardner, the elder son has been in St Louis the past few years and Glenn, the younger is at home. The distinguished title of General was bestowed on Mrs. Gordon in 1847 by the Governor Ansel Briggs of Iowa, the commission, the original of which we were shown, was dated at Iowa City June 27, and appointed the General the command of "the second division of Iowa militia" We do not hear that he ever performed any active service, but the appointment was a deserved recognition of worth of a prominent esteemed citizen.
Though at home no man stood higher in the confidence and affection of the people than Mr. Gordon we believe that during his long residence here he held but one public office, and that was the humble municipal trust of alderman. Not that he was urged to serve the public with his clear judgement and fine abilities, but that he was a part of the philosophy of his life to abstain from active participation in politics, preferring rather the quiet and pleasures of home and the honors of a successful business to the turmoil and strife of the political arena. As a Mason, however, he was one of the oldest and most esteemed members of the order. General Gordon will be missed in every walk and circle of Muscatine life and society. Prominent and active in business; liberal and zealous in forwarding public enterprises; genial intelligent and communicative in society with a rich store of anecdote and reminiscence to entertain friends, his death will leave a void hard to fill and bring a pang to every heart. Who that was not familiar with his fine figure and handsome pre sense as he made his regular diurnal trips between the store and house? Time, with his magic wand, had touched him but lightly; yes so gently that in his more than thirty years of reputable citizenship he seemed but little changed, either as to the cheerful and intellectual face or the lively and sympathetic spirit antimating him, and he glided almost imperceptibly into the ripeness of old age. At heart he was kindness itself. Talmage told us that a single flash would sometimes reveal all the secret springs in a mans life, and so a simple incident will serve to illustrate Gen Gordon's character. On the bitterly cold Friday just before his illness, a well known professional begger, a woman, came into the store to solicit charity. She stood near the door some little time without receiving attention, when the General chanced to observe her for the first time. Hastening forward he placed a piece of money in her hand and politely bowed her out remarking on his return that he "couldn't turn a dong away without something on such a day". But we cannot speak further of this admirable traits of character which so endeared him to this relatives and immediate friends and made him personally so popular. His long life of usefulness and activity will be an enduring monument that speaks more eloquently than words and will keep his memory green. The General was a regular attendant at Trinity church, and was one of its most zealous an liberal supporters. The bereaved widow and children of deceased have the deepest sympathy of the community in their sore affliction. The funeral will take place from the family residence on Second Street, on Saturday, at 10 o'clock a.m. The paul bearers selected are: H W Moore, G A Garrettson, P. Jackson, F H Stone, J Carskaddan, A Jackson, John Lemp, J J Hoopes, and J P Ament. , direct ancestor of John G Gordon holds in safe keeping the above mentioned "commission" dated June 27 1847.