Bruce Dean Larson


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Bruce Dean Larson




 

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Bruce Larson (on statue) and Denny McFarland at Union Park, Watertown, Jefferson Co., WI, Summer, 1954.


 


William Raue

June 16, 1903:  

At about 9 o'clock last Saturday evening as Wm. C. Raue was returning to this city from the country where he had been looking over a painting job some of his men were doing, his horse became frightened about three miles east of here at something in the road, shied suddenly and ran into a fence, throwing Mr. Raue out, and in the fall his right foot caught in the buggy wheel and he sustained a compound fracture of the ankle, the bone being broken in a number of places. After he was thrown out the horse continued its flight and threw a young man who was in the buggy out also, but he escaped injury. The buggy was badly smashed. A farmer evidently near the scene of the accident hitched up and brought Mr. Raue and his companion in town. He was taken to his home in 4th street where he is at present getting along nicely, but his injuries will confine him to his home for several weeks.


William C. Raue died at 9:30 AM Sunday, February 3,1929, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ben Gritzmacher, Kenosha, Kenosha Co., WI, at age 76. Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Watertown, Jefferson Co., WI.


The Watertown Gazette, Watertown, Jefferson Co., WI, February 7, 1929

DEATH OF WILLIAM RAUE

One of Watertown’s Most Prominent and Enterprising Citizens

William C. Raue, one of Watertown’s most prominent and enterprising citizens, died at 9:30 o’clock last Sunday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ben Gritzmacher, Kenosha, Wis., where he had been visiting several weeks. January 24th he was taken ill with paralysis, and though he received the best of medical attendance and care, the hand of death could not be stayed. Mr. Raue was born in Mittenwaldes province of Brandenberg, Germany, on October 16, 1852, and in April, 1856, he came to Watertown with his parents and made this city his home ever since. After he left school he secured a position with the firm of Straw & Murphy, who for many years were engaged in the decorating and painting business in West Main Street.  He remained in their employ for 17 years, and on Feb. 5, 1885, formed a co-partnership with an employee of the same firm, in the same line of business, Theodore Dobbratz, now of Milwaukee. In 1887 Mr. Raue purchased his partner’s interest in the firm, and continued the business on his own account at 309 Main Street. In 1901 he purchased of the late William Volkmann the store building at 202 Main and continued the business therein till the present time, where his sons, Baldwin S. and Joseph J. Raue, have been associated with him as partners for a number of years past, the firm being incorporated in 1903 under the name of Wm. C. Raue & Sons Co., with William C. Raue as president, Baldwin S. Raue as Vice-president, and Joseph J. Raue as secretary and treasurer. His wife, formerly Louise Sanders, Buffalo, New York, died in 1904.  Two sons, Baldwin and Joseph Raue, and one daughter, Mrs. Ben. Gritzmacher of Kenosha, survive him. One daughter died in infancy.  Five grandchildren also survive him:  William, Edward and Philip and Joseph, Jr., and Eunice Raue.  One brother, Fred, is a resident of Nebraska, and three sisters, Mrs. Emily Frey, Mrs. Emma Voigt and Louise Richards of Milwaukee also survive him.  His brother, also a former Watertown resident in the same line of business as the deceased, died a short time ago in Milwaukee. Mr. Raue was a member of the German M. E. church, of Lincoln Lodge No. 20, Knights of Pythias, a member of the K. P. Calantha club and of the Plattdeutscher Verein.  His funeral was private from his late home, 302 Fourth Street, Rev. G. W. Schmidt, pastor of the German M. E. church officiating, and his remains were interred in Oak Hill Cemetery. In the death of Mr. Raue Watertown has lost one of its most well-to-do, enterprising and honorable business men, and an artist in the painting line that had few equals. The editor of The Gazette has been an intimate friend of his since boyhood, and during our long acquaintance has known him to be one of Watertown’s most honorable men.  He was greatly interested in all civic affairs and has done his full share toward the upbuilding and prosperity of our city. He served two terms in the city council. With the many other friends of his bereaved family, the editor extends his sincere sympathy to them.


 


Watertown City Directory, 1945

Raue & Sons Inc (Inc 1903, Cap $10,000). Baldwin S Raue Pres, Evelyn Rau V-Pres, Edward S Raue Sec-Treas, Paints, Oils and Varnish Dealers and Painting Contractors, 110 N 3d, Tel 172


 


Watertown Daily Times, April 22, 2006

GOLF COURSE MEMORIES

Our old friend Joe Pinkie stopped into our office earlier this week to visit for a while. We haven't see Joe all that much in recent months and that's primarily because he is no longer fond of the cold weather we deal with in the winter months. But, with temperatures creeping up into the 70s and some sunshine warming everything Joe thought it was time to pay us a visit. It was really enjoyable talking with him. Joe said, “Spring is a very special time of the year and my walks to downtown are filled with delightful things to see. We have tulips and many other early spring flowers blooming over the place, the trees are getting buds, and best of all, the grass is a vibrant green.” We couldn't agree with Joe more. Then, he said one of his old friends called and asked if he'd like to take a ride around town to see how spring was breaking out all over. Joe agreed and the next thing you know he was talking about how lush and beautiful the fairways are at the two golf courses in Watertown. Joe said, “I never was a big golfer but did play a few holes back when Watertown Country Club only had nine holes. And, I've enjoyed watching the development over at Windwood although I never played there. Still, the most fun I had was over at Ed Raue's house when we had some informal matches, complete with some cold beer. Now, that was fun.”  Well, that little conversation turned into a pretty lengthy one and brought back some memories for us as well. While we never played on Ed's private course we remember it well. Now, if you're memory doesn't go back as far as the late 1960s or possibly 1970, you are not likely to remember the course we're talking about. Yes, Joe is right - sort of! Ed Raue had a unique golf course on his property on the east side of town and it was highly visible from Highway 16. As usual, the conversation ended rather abruptly when Joe said he was late for a meeting with a couple of old friends and a mug or two of the golden brew. Well, that conversation got us thinking about Ed Raue's golf course and we ended up taking a ride out to the site at N3082 East Gate Drive. This is the house on the hill between East Gate Drive and Highway 16 where it splits into the bypass a few hundred feet to the west. There's a short north-south road connecting the highway with East Gate Drive that forms the west boundary of the property. As we looked at the property, you can tell where at least one of the greens was located but today it's pretty hard because over the years the grass was allowed to grow and now it looks more like a meadow. Years ago the course was located on the east side of the house and buildings and was quite visible for people traveling west on Highway 16. We needed to know a little more so we called Jim Raue, Ed's son, who is now living in Winter Park, Fla. Jim remembered the course well. He told us, “Yes, that was quite a place! Back in about 1957 the state was in the process of constructing the Highway 16 bypass and the new Highway 16 and that split the parcel of property, with some on the south side of the new road and some on the north side.” “The owner of the property had died and dad, seeing the potential, made a deal with the family to first lease and then later buy the property,” he added. Ed all along saw the potential for a mini golf course there which could be the focal point of social and business entertaining. So, he had two PGA regulation greens developed and then installed nine tees which were scattered down at the lower or eastern level of the property. Harold Hell, a well-known Watertown resident was hired to keep the course well manicured. Many of our longtime readers will remember Harold as a full-time fireman but given his schedule there was time to handle some of the course maintenance. So, there's just enough information to whet your appetite and we've run out of space. We'll continue with this story next week when we bring along some memories from Jim as well as a little more information. Stay tuned.

TLS


Bruce Larson

Professor of Economics

152 Karpen Hall, CPO 2110

828.251.6562

blarson@unca.edu

Dr. Larson joined the faculty of UNC Asheville in fall 1983 upon receiving his Ph.D. in economics from UNC-Chapel Hill. A microeconomist and historian of economic thought by education, he has taught a broad array of courses in economics and Humanities 124, 214, 324, and 414. He has a special affection for the principles of microeconomics, where additional perspectives emerge with each new group of students. Dr. Larson distributes a weekly email—The Invisible Forces—that summarizes and comments upon selected articles on economics with a broader perspective. You can learn more about it at: https://sites.google.com/site/brucedeanlarson/the-invisible-forces. Please let him know if you would like to receive it.

Along with his teaching activities, Dr. Larson has served in a variety of administrative roles. From fall 1996 through spring 2004, he chaired the Department of Economics, and from fall 2004 through spring 2010, he directed the Center for Teaching and Learning. From spring 2010 to spring 2012, he chaired the SACSCOC Executive Committee, which guided the successful reaffirmation of accreditation of UNC Asheville. In this last year before his retirement, he is serving as the Coordinator of Academic Quality and Accountability and SACSCOC liaison for the University.

Faculty governance activities have been an important part of Dr. Larson’s academic career, having been a member of the UNC Asheville Faculty Senate for five three-year terms.  Beyond the university Dr. Larson has focused his activity on the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, where he has served in many capacities, including two years as the President of its Board of Trustees, six years on its Committee on Ministries, and three years on its Nominating Committee. He has been the convener of its monthly Peacemaking Potluck since March 2007.

Dr. Larson shares his life with his wife Jean Larson, who is a gardener, lover of animals, and an environmental activist with an MSN from UNC-Chapel Hill. They have two, California-based children: Hope Larson, who is the author of graphic novels, most recently the adaptation and illustration of A Wrinkle in Time, and Will Larson, who is a managing engineer for Uber. Their animal friends include a bird, two cats, a dog, a llama, and a mule. He is looking forward to his retirement on June 30, 2015.

Education

B.A., Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Ph.D., Economics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Courses Taught 

  1. ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics

  2. ECON 302 Intermediate Microeconomics

  3. ECON 306 Managerial Finance

  4. ECON 360 Mathematical Economics

Professional Interests

Dialogue and small-group practices in higher education, including polarity management

Strength-based approaches to personal and organizational development, including appreciative inquiry positive psychology

Traditions of economic thinking